Switch to clocks

Discussion in 'Clock Construction' started by Jon Hanson, Jun 11, 2009.

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  1. Jon Hanson

    Jon Hanson Registered User
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    Aug 24, 2000
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    An old friend of mine Bob Schmidt, the auctioneer, recently gave a nice talk at a Boston Watch and Clock meeting in Watertown, Ma.

    Included in his nice talk, including books on the subject, he spoke of skeleton clocks and kits for same.

    Now, I am not a clock collector, but I DO LIKE CLOCKS.:)

    One interesting aspect recently discussed on the pocket watch board was the discussion of FAKE dials used to profiteer and supposedly use to replace hairlined originals.

    I now have the answer--COLLECT SKELETON CLOCKS--less dial problems!:myhappy:

    Maybe I can get some of the watch folks to SWITCH to clocks!
     
  2. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User
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    #2 eskmill, Jun 12, 2009
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2009
    Jon.

    Lots and lots of skeleton clocks were and are made using the wheelwork taken from old English dial clocks.

    Even today, NAWCC advocates making a skeleton clock using Hermle parts in homemade plates.

    Go figure again. :p

    Les
     
  3. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
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    Jon, why not make "skeleton watches" out of your dialless ones? Use brightly coloured hands, and paint numbers on the lens?
     
  4. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    I'd paint a portrait in the center of the lens, surrounded by the numbers. Hey (i), with the right attachments, we could use them as fancy pendulum bobs, similar to the Gilbert portrait pendulums, with the exception that our bobs would also tell time.:D
     
  5. Jon Hanson

    Jon Hanson Registered User
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    No way, I collect original, ANTIQUE watches.

    Old skeleton clocks are wonderful for several reasons. Until Bob's talk I was not aware of skeleton clock kits. While I would NOT want a modern creation, these probably serve a purpose for GUYS WHO LIKE TO CONSTRUCT things. For me I would want the original.

    Question: how good are the modern buildable skeletons? Easy to recognize?
     
  6. Kim St.Dennis Sr.

    Kim St.Dennis Sr. Registered User
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    Mar 20, 2003
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    There is the following link to a new Skeleton Clock Kit web sit:

    http://www.classicclockkits.com/

    I seen these at local Regionals in varying states of disrepair. I bought two of them last year as basket cases.

    I saw two completed single train versions at this years National and going for real money, listed as made in the 1850's. Also there were 2 more completed ones being sold as completed kit clocks. There was also several of the 2 train version offered as antique clocks or completed kit clocks. Lots of confusion.

    I think that the reason for this confusion is the kits are made very well and from the movements of old English Fusee Railroad or Post Clocks. English Post clock are not particularly good looking, but the movements are fantastic! The fusee movements are made with thick brass plates and with a 9 to 10 inch pendulum drop. They make great skeleton clock movements. 10's of thousands of these clocks were made for every railroad station, post office and shop in England in the late 1800's.

    The English magazine "Clocks" just completed an article regarding the restoration of one of the single train model kits and the author identified it as dating from 1850's.

    These kits look like they would be a fun project and make a great looking skeleton clocks at a somewhat decent price.
     

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