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Sweep second hand wheel remover

RJSoftware

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Apr 15, 2005
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Hello all.

Working on a Omega yesterday it has a sweep second hand wheel. Lucky for me I took it off with a pair of tweezers and didn't bust the arbor.

It had to come off so I could install a new mainspring.

Anyway, went looking for a sweep second hand wheel puller and found a few on the bay. Expensive suckers.

So the thing that has me a bit confused is the push legs (the nylon ends) they just don't make any sense.

I understand the gap the one puller tong has and that is to reach on both sides of the sweep second hand's wheel's spoke. While the other one without the gap goes in-between two spokes.

At least that is what I imagine the arrangement is. I see the sweep second hand wheel has 5 spokes so there is no way to avoid a spoke being in the middle. Because if you pick a spot for the non gap between two spokes, the opposite side will have one near in the middle.

So in examining the tool I see that the nylons are just the normal pushers like the Presto hand pullers. This adds to the confusion.

So the question is how does the thing work if the grip has to saddle both sides of one spoke, but the pusher don't...?

I would certainly hope that it is not expected to simply grab and lift. One could certainly accidentally pull up at an angle and still break the arbor.

But it doesn't make sense as even Bergeon makes same thing. Why is there not a gap on the pushing foot/nylon like there is on the one tong?

I also have been considering grinding a gap in one of my normal Presto hand pullers. Anyone try it?

RJ
 

Samantha

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Jun 28, 2009
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Hi RJ,
There are two types of wheel pullers, one for 5 spoke wheels and one for 6 spoke wheels. The pullers are designed to lift up on the underside of the hub while the nylon legs rest on the train bridge, which allows the hub to be lifted up. Pullers are the correct way to remove the wheels, as they lift equally and minimize the potential to damage/bend the pinion.
Samantha
 

RJSoftware

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Apr 15, 2005
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Hey thanks Samantha. Much appreciated. (Hope your doing well!)
Any chance you could show me a pic of them?
RJ
 

NC Plumber

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Jan 15, 2011
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I've got a Presto for the 5 spoke wheels, one arm is notched to fit over a spoke and under the wheel, the other arm reaches up under the wheel thru the opening between the spokes. Daves watch parts has a pair or 2 available at a very reasonable price.
http://daveswatchparts.com/Handpullers.html
 
Last edited:

Al J

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Jul 21, 2009
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I use this tool daily pretty much, as I service a lot of chronographs where the drive wheel has to be removed, like so:

Presto1_zpsfuvqjp4b.jpg

And here it is with the wheel removed:

Presto2_zpswrhdmqpx.jpg

The operation is pretty self evident really...

Cheers, Al
 

karlmansson

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Apr 20, 2013
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Mine is not so different after all. The biggest difference is that the "pushers" aren't nylon but aluminium. I put it in quotes because the are not really pushers, just supports for
the actual pushers that protrude just as the jaws do. So on pusher straddles a spoke and the other goes between two. This is the five spoke version and it's pretty old. Hope it helps!

304337.jpg 304338.jpg 304339.jpg
 

Attachments

Colditz

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Jun 9, 2020
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w1850_pic1ab_cmyk.jpg Here's a pic from Cousins web site. You can clearly see the brass outer legs will go down onto the base plate and the black metal turned legs will grip the underside of the 5 spoke wheel when the silver coloured spring steel sides are pressed. The nylon carries the brass legs which are secured and run down a slot in the black spring steel legs Good tool just bought one.
 

Allepunta

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Jul 31, 2020
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Not a big fan of those tools. Most of the time you can get away with a drop of oil in the pivot, locking the wheeltrain with the pallet in place and turning the wheel in its pivot using a pegwood or similar. As you keep turning it will come up.
for assembly I will always oil the jewell and push the wheel with the horia tool and a made anvil for the stone at the bottom. I do this before the escapment is assembled so
I can spin the wheeltrain and control the flatness of the wheel. If it wobbels, the pivot is not straight.
 

DeweyC

NAWCC Member
Feb 5, 2007
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Not a big fan of those tools. Most of the time you can get away with a drop of oil in the pivot, locking the wheeltrain with the pallet in place and turning the wheel in its pivot using a pegwood or similar. As you keep turning it will come up.
for assembly I will always oil the jewell and push the wheel with the horia tool and a made anvil for the stone at the bottom. I do this before the escapment is assembled so
I can spin the wheeltrain and control the flatness of the wheel. If it wobbels, the pivot is not straight.
I agree w/ Allepunta. I gave all my Prestos away (gratis, free, get them outahere!) at a Mart w/ my cautions.

I use Boley D's for all second hands and on things like 861s. Use a piece of sandwich bag to cover the hand and protect the dial. Grip the pipe and pull. And therein lies the reason. Hand pullers pull the hand off the pipe if the hand is set tight on the arbor.

I also remove driving wheels w/o a puller. As I was taught, I start by rotating the wheel CCW with bronze tweezers. When looser, I remove w. the D tweezers via the top hub.

CAUTION: In my exam two year kids prepared our watches. For one 2892 one student had to completely rebuild the movement in the alloted 3 hours. The driving wheel on my 861 was driven on way too tight. When I asked for a soldering iron (to expand the brass) they all were all too busy laughing at the way Americans properly pronounce solder. I relented and did as taught to my regret. Not only did I get charged for the drving wheel and 4th wheel, I snapped a leaf off the 3rd pinion! Still came out in the middle of the pack; but I was happy I was not there to get a high score for a job.

This occurs often on A/C clocks like the 37500, which frequently have cracked 4th jewels because the workman closed his eyes after using a puler to remove the driving wheel and broke the jewel with the arbor shoulder.

If this is the case and heat does not help, I disassemble the piece with the driving wheel still installed on the 4th. Then I lever the arbor off the driving wheel from inside the plate. The driving wheel hub pulls on the plate and not the jewel.

This is the same situation with 17 jewel pocket watches with hollow ctr pinions. If the fit is tight, there is a REAL good chance the upper ctr jewel will be damaged. Very poor design but these often are important watches.

I recently had to make a ctr jewel for one such watch. Was not hard, glad I learned it but most people would throw up the hands and close their eyes because they are not even equipped with a lathe.
 

Allepunta

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Jul 31, 2020
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to me is a feeling of no control. The wheel is tight and suddenly it isn't. the same with hands, always the feel that I am gonna bend a hand that I want to re-use the moment the hands snap free. you also need to be carefull with levers and prepare and polish them for hands but at at least you can feel the hand coming out gradually, you are in control...
 

Al J

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Jul 21, 2009
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to me is a feeling of no control. The wheel is tight and suddenly it isn't. the same with hands, always the feel that I am gonna bend a hand that I want to re-use the moment the hands snap free. you also need to be carefull with levers and prepare and polish them for hands but at at least you can feel the hand coming out gradually, you are in control...
Thanks for the reply.

I agree completely on hands - I only use levers on hands as hands are much more fragile, and often worth a lot more money, than a train wheel or movement parts is (at least on some of the watches I work on where one central chronograph hand can be a $10k hand).

I've never damaged a drive wheel or pivot using the Presto style, so yes the wheel comes off "without warning" if you will, but no damage is done. I certainly use the "unwinding" technique if someone has pressed a wheel on too far and it's too tight, but that is an uncommon thing in my experience.

Cheers, Al
 

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