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Sunday Hunting

musicguy

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I'm cheating for the Sunday Hunting thread, here is a "sidewinder" that I have had for a very long time.
It is a hunting case movement so it should be fine, and it's one of my older favorites when I first
bought it. The dial has some cracks, and the case is very well worn, and I'm cool with that.
It was used by someone for a very long time. Circa 1881 Elgin Grade 4, Model 3, 16 size, 15 jewels, 3/4 plate,
adjusted and could have been used for RR use at the time

It has a very simple looking movement from circa 1881 but
there is something about it that I really liked when I originally bought it, and I still do.
I do like the balance cock (yea maybe I'm strange)
it has a cool depth to it when you look closely at the movement (not sure how to explain it)
but this movement really has a 3d look. The nickel plates accentuate this nicely.
The simple straight line dial signature I like as well.

It's now in my pocket.

Enjoy your Sunday!

1645966406576.png 1645966669216.jpeg 1645966902282.png
Rob

1645966274565.png
 
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Clint Geller

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On this date, February 27, in the year 1860, a former Illinois congressman and unsuccessful Senate candidate named Abraham Lincoln delivered a powerful speech in the Great Hall of the newly founded Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science & Art in New York City, my alma mater. Lincoln's "Cooper Union Address," also known as his "Right Makes Might" speech, systematically analyzed the attitudes of all the signers of the US Constitution on the question of the expansion of slavery. With a magnetic mixture of cogent analysis and folksy humor, on that day this gangly, somewhat uncouth looking frontier lawyer succeeded in convincing a skeptical eastern intelligentsia that he was serious presidential timber. "No man ever made such an impression on his first appearance to a New York audience," the New York Tribune concluded. The CU Great Hall, which still exists, was then the largest secular meeting hall in New York City. Since 1860, the Cooper Union Great Hall has hosted the birth of the American women's suffrage movement, and the founding of the NAACP and of the Red Cross. A somewhat less momentous event, my graduating class's commencement exercise, took place in that same room in 1975.

In honor of Lincoln's historic address and my alma mater, which gifted me with an entirely free quality college education (I majored in physics and math), I took out one of my Civil War provenance watches today: a Waltham Appleton, Tracy & Co. grade Model 1859, SN 31,928, finished in May of 1860, the same year as Lincoln's speech. The movement was purchased in a silver "A.T. & Co." hunting case by a young Harvard student, John Hodges Jr. of Salem Massachusetts, who had his name and the town of his birth engraved on the dust cover. When the Civil War erupted in April of the following year, Hodges left his studies to become one of our nation's First Defenders, the men who answered then President Lincoln's initial call for 75,000 troops to defend the Union. From the start of his military career as a private in the Salem Zouaves, which subsequently was consolidated into the 8th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry as Company I, Hodges continued his service as a first lieutenant in the 19th MA Infantry, and then as a major in the 50th MA Infantry, which saw fighting around White Bayou and Port Hudson in Louisiana in 1863. (Pvt. Hodges of the Salem Zouaves is shown in the group picture below, seated on the ground at lower left. The next image is of Hodges likely when he was a major.) Then in early 1864, Hodges was commissioned as the Lieutenant Colonel of the 59th MA Infantry.

The 59th MA started out in April of 1864 with 950 men on its roster, when they went with newly promoted Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant into Virginia on his blood-soaked Overland Campaign as part of the Union's Army of the Potomac. The 59th MA saw hard fighting at the Wilderness, and under Hodges's command, at Spotsylvania, North Anna, and Cold Harbor, four of the most sanguinary and terrifying battles of the war. By the time the 59th MA reached Petersburg VA in June of 1864, they were down to 250 men. Lt. Col. Hodges had been in command of the regiment for nearly the entire campaign. Then on July 30, 1864, the 59th MA's brigade led the Union advance during the disastrous Battle of the Crater. The Union plan was to penetrate the Confederate defenses around the crucial rail junction of Petersburg by detonating a large explosion in a tunnel that was dug beneath the rebel works by Pennsylvania coal miners at a place now known as Elliott's Salient. If it had been properly organized and equipped, the assault might have achieved a breakthrough and ended the war nine months earlier. Alas, the Battle of the Crater was a poorly organized and ill-equipped debacle, and Lt. Col. Hodges was one of 3,728 Union casualties that day.

As John Hodges was nursing a fresh wound while leaning against the side of the steep-sided crater blasted by the explosion, he was killed instantly by shrapnel from a confederate shell. One of Hodges' surviving compatriots retrieved his watch from his pocket and enclosed it along with a letter to John's older brother, Captain Thorndike Deland Hodges of the 35th US Colored Troops (a.k.a., the First North Carolina Colored Volunteers). These events, and the fact that John's watch was in his pocket when he was killed in action on July 30, 1864, are documented in the Harvard Memorial Biographies Volume II, to which Thorndike Hodges contributed five pages about his brother. Thus ended the life and military career of 22 year old John Hodges Jr., but not necessarily the war time service of his watch. For it is very possible that Thorndike carried his brother's watch when he commanded his company of black troops of the 35th USCT, nearly all of whom were newly emancipated slaves, at the Battle of Honey Hill, in Jasper County, SC, on November 30, 1864. At Honey Hill, the 35th USCT fought alongside the more storied 54th Massachusetts Infantry, whose courageous assault on the rebel Fort Wagner was portrayed in the Hollywood movie, Glory. Both units fought valiantly at Honey Hill, sustaining heavy losses. The last picture shown here is a post-war image of Thorndike Hodges, who served one term in the Massachusetts State Assembly, in which he is sporting a watch chain on his vest. One would like to imagine that John's watch was on the other end of that chain.

Hodges Watch Movement.JPG DSC_0063 cropped.jpg Hodges Watch Front Lid.JPG Lt Col J Hodges Jr M59 Int Case Front - 2.JPG Cuvette Inscription.JPG New Zoaves image.jpg Photo of Major John Hodges.jpg Figure 104 - TD Hodges JPG.jpg
 
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Rick Hufnagel

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The Elgin grade 4 is a quality movement, no doubt. I've been running this one in for a while now after a new mainspring and a gold clean and oil. It's lived in a couple cases since being purchased as a bare movement but since the 11 jewel that came in this case was completely shot out.... This nickel Fahys is now it's forever home and I'm happy to tote it around.

20220227_104313.jpg 20220227_104339.jpg

I'm not carrying this, and probably never will, but it is wound up and keeping time very well. It is the Lady Elgin in a J. Boss case. The case has a small pin sized ding in the back, and the movement has a plate jewel replaced (which bothers me more than the case ding) but I still can't believe it found its way here. Beautiful.
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musicguy

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Fantastic lady Elgin in a fantastic case

And the grade four is Great too
 
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Rick Hufnagel

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That second hand!!
Aww yeah!
Total transparency... The watch came with three different hands on it. I love the lady Elgin and have a handful of loose movements. This hand set came from another that was pretty close in serial number. They are plumb colored and needed some straightening... But man are they pretty!
 
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DwayneR

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For today, I was winding and setting my model 92 crescent street with the fleur-dis-lis hands. It is not in its original case. Unfortunately, shortly after winding, the balance wheel stopped, and won't swing at all. So...back on the shelf it goes, until I can learn how to disassemble it without breaking it to figure out what's wrong. Fun while it ticked though!

Waltham Crescent St Face.jpg Waltham Crescent St movement.jpg
 

musicguy

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Dave Coatsworth

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If you gently rotate the watch back and forth, does it spin at all?
Yes, perhaps it overbanked. If so, the balance wheel will move in one direction but not the other.
 

DwayneR

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If you gently rotate the watch back and forth, does it spin at all?

Rob
Unfortunately, no. It DID, but then after setting and winding, it just stopped. I can gently turn the balance, nudging it with a piece of peg, but it doesn't spring back. With little else to go on, I think it might have overbanked (is that the right word)? I won't mess with it until I gain some experience on some other non-working movements I have. At least it still looks pretty, but will like to get it going again one day for sure. I was all set to carry this around for a bit to see how well it kept time. However, I must admit I acquired it from that "place" and have no idea of its true condition under the plate.
 

DwayneR

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Yes, perhaps it overbanked. If so, the balance wheel will move in one direction but not the other.
It doesn't move in either direction if gently rotated. Before I touched it, it did. The wheel is not bound, but it doesn't spring. I'll have to take an other look at it, maybe the spring came out of the stud or something.
 

musicguy

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It doesn't move in either direction if gently rotated. Before I touched it, it did. The wheel is not bound, but it doesn't spring. I'll have to take an other look at it, maybe the spring came out of the stud or something.
Said in a nice respectful way :) :) I wouldn't touch it anymore for a while
or have a competent watchmaker look at it. If it's a jewel, hairspring, or
balance staff which all take a decent amount of knowledge and specialty tools
to repair. Obviously, I do not know what knowledge you have it's
just friendly advice.


Rob
 
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DwayneR

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Said in a nice respectful way :) :) I wouldn't touch it anymore for a while
or have a competent watchmaker look at it. If it's a jewel, hairspring, or
balance staff which all take a decent amount of knowledge and specialty tools
to repair. Obviously, I do not know what knowledge you have it's
just friendly advice.


Rob
Friendly advice well received. I agree. I have only cursory knowledge of these machines. I could definitely do more harm than good if I started poking in there on my own. Thank you.
 
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Jerry Treiman

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Circa 1881 Elgin Grade 4, Model 3, 16 size, 15 jewels, 3/4 plate,
That was in post #201, above, and Rick showed us his in post #204. My own grade 4 (ca.1882) is somewhere in between the two. I see that mine and Rick's have micrometer regulators but Rob's early example does not, so it appears it was a feature added to the production shortly after Rob's. (I have always liked this watch and shared it in one of my Favorite Elgin posts).
1399088m1.jpg
 

Dave Coatsworth

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I'll share my grade 4 even though I'm not really wearing it today since I'm working outside. It is later than Rob's but earlier than Jerry's and has a simple regulator.

Elgin1171171Dial.jpg Elgin1171171Mvmt.jpg
 

Ethan Lipsig

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Out today is a pretty 6-size Model 1890 Waltham Riverside Maximus. These are fairly uncommon; only 500 were made, all hunters. This watch had been recased in YGF Keystone J. Boss case before I acquired it, so I had no reticence recasing it in its present multi-color solid 14k gold case, with diamond decorations. This case had housed a lesser grade Model 1890. The case is stamped M.F. & Co. That might mean Marshall Field & Co. or it could be the markings of an case maker unknown to me. If you can identify M.F. & Co., I'd be grateful.

IMG_2976.JPG DSC01033.JPG DSC01015.JPG DSC01016.JPG DSC01017.JPG DSC01019.JPG DSC01022.JPG DSC01023.JPG DSC01025.JPG DSC01026.JPG DSC01030.JPG DSC01031.JPG scan0077.jpg
 

Clint Geller

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Out today is a pretty 6-size Model 1890 Waltham Riverside Maximus. These are fairly uncommon; only 500 were made, all hunters. This watch had been recased in YGF Keystone J. Boss case before I acquired it, so I had no reticence recasing it in its present multi-color solid 14k gold case, with diamond decorations. This case had housed a lesser grade Model 1890. The case is stamped M.F. & Co. That might mean Marshall Field & Co. or it could be the markings of an case maker unknown to me. If you can identify M.F. & Co., I'd be grateful.

View attachment 698961 View attachment 698960 View attachment 698950 View attachment 698951 View attachment 698952 View attachment 698953 View attachment 698954 View attachment 698955 View attachment 698956 View attachment 698957 View attachment 698958 View attachment 698959 View attachment 698962
Another fabulous Ethan Lipsig case. And a gorgeous movement to match.
 

Jerry Treiman

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The case is stamped M.F. & Co. That might mean Marshall Field & Co. or it could be the markings of an case maker unknown to me. If you can identify M.F. & Co., I'd be grateful.
I would feel pretty comfortable in attributing the M.F.& Co. marking to Marshall Field & Company. I have a reprint of their 1898 catalog which devotes an entire page to "6-size, 14K extra heavy, diamond decorated cases". The illustrations in this 1898 catalog are all labeled "WESTERN", presumably the Western Watch Case Manufacturing Co., but they may have used other case makers in other years to fill this niche. The crown mark in your case seems to be that of "Roy & Co." but I do not know if this evolved into the Roy Watch Case Co. or if it was a similarly-named company that did not survive. A 1904 trademark index shows both companies, noting that Roy & Co was out of business at this point.
Roy TM.jpg
 

Ethan Lipsig

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The ad copy I posted in #221 for the Model 1890 Riverside Maximus movement states that it has 21 jewels, but the movement depicted, and my Model 1890, both are inscribed "19 Jewels". Which is correct, the ad copy or the inscription?
 

Jerry Treiman

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The ad copy I posted in #221 for the Model 1890 Riverside Maximus movement states that it has 21 jewels, but the movement depicted, and my Model 1890, both are inscribed "19 Jewels". Which is correct, the ad copy or the inscription?
The ad copy is definitely incorrect. It looks like they may have inadvertantly taken the text from their 12-size Maximus description. Here are descriptions from an 1899 catalog -
Maximus_99Bogle.jpg
 

musicguy

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It's Sunday, what hunting case are you wearing today. :)

I am wearing this boat anchor today, wound, set and in my pocket.

4oz Newport Coin silver Hunting case with hinged hunting bezel
National Watch Company H. Z. Culver #2971 circa 1867
With period key.

IMG_8145s.jpg

IMG_8148.jpg
IMG_8151n.jpg




Rob
 

musicguy

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musicguy

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I agree that really is a substantial case.


Rob
 

musicguy

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Sunday Hunting....
Wearing this Sears Roebuck & Co. watch today. At one time it was one of the Greatest
Stores in the United States.

20221120_091158.jpg
20221120_091257.jpg

Illinois Watch Co. Grade: 164 circa 1904



Rob
 
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Bostonjoe

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This old Waltham keywind is the watch I am wearing today. I particularly like the coin silver case, it is very nicely decorated. The movement is a Model 57, SN 292986. Both the case and the movement needed help when I acquired it, thanks to Bill E. and Rob C. for their help in repairing it. It is a great timekeeper.

IMG_7071 2.JPG IMG_7072 2.JPG IMG_7073 2.JPG
 

Thyme4Clocks

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For Sunday Worship at my Church) Hampden “New Railway” 18s 17j.

“Three-ply” chain not included in purchase of watch originally but purchased later at watch shop. Yes, know the minute hand is bent, but I rather like it, think it adds some “character!” :emoji_tophat: Runs well for its age and am quite happy with it.

This is my first (and probably only for a while at least) pw..
Lol · ·
:emoji_clock:


Hampden_Mosaic.png
 

musicguy

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I have had 4 watches running all weekend and have been enjoying them. One
of them is a Hunter that is in my pocket today for Sunday Hunting.
It's one of my favorites.

Just took these photos and put it in the pocket.

Amn. Watch Co. Model 1873-6 circa 1886 16j

20221218_074144.jpg
20221218_074256.jpg



Rob
 

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