Starcam removel, Hamberg American

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by disciple_dan, Mar 14, 2019.

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  1. disciple_dan

    disciple_dan Registered User
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    Mar 10, 2016
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    Well, while I wait on parts for Sessions Tambour I'm starting this clock that has been identified as a possible Hamberg American.
    I have it stipped down and ready for cleaning except for the star cam. This movement has a unique design where the steel minute arbor is only 2.2 mm in diameter. It has an elongated star camshaft. The minute arbor passes through this shaft and protrudes at the tip. The elongated star camshaft has the square end to receive the minute hand and the hour canon fits over this and exposes the square tip of the cams shaft.
    I want to take this off and inspect it and clean the bearing.
    Are there any special precautions to take? This looks like a hard piece to repair or replace if damaged.
    Do I take this off in the normal way?
    20190314_142350_Film1HAC.jpg 20190314_142406_Film1HAC.jpg
    These are the makings that may identify it as a Hamberg
    20190314_090851.jpg
     
  2. shutterbug

    shutterbug Super Moderator
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    You have a couple of issues to deal with. If the minute hand does not have a hand bushing, then you have to get that star back on in an exact manner. Not easy. Personally, I don't take those parts off unless they need to be bushed. They can be pried off with a little heat.
     
  3. disciple_dan

    disciple_dan Registered User
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    Ok, the steel arbor does turn inside of the star camshaft in order to set the time I assume. So what markings do I make to get back to good? If it turns inside the shaft it will always be different. Is it not supposed to turn in there?
     
  4. David S

    David S Registered User
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    I thought when I took one of those apart, it just lifts off. The cut out part of the cannon tube is a friction fit on the minute arbour. May take a bit but from memory it pulls off.

    David
     
  5. disciple_dan

    disciple_dan Registered User
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    Hey David, I'm pretty sure it will pry off fairly easy, It just makes me nervous. It doesn't seem to need to be bushed. One guy taught to always remove it and clean out the bearing and polish the pivot. What do you guys do? Do I really need to do that?
     
  6. disciple_dan

    disciple_dan Registered User
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    I think I see what you mean now sutterbug. It does have a bushing is the hand.
     
  7. disciple_dan

    disciple_dan Registered User
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    Ok, I got the springs out. I don't like the way they look.
    The first pic is the chime spring which looks pretty good. It seems to have the punched hole from the manufacturer.
    The time and strick springs look like the hole was cut or drilled and they look like they have been heated up to soften them for that purpose. Maybe he heated them again to harden them. Is that something you would normally do to keep from buying a new spring? Is that acceptable?
    If the hole as just ripped and you only shortened it a couple of inches??
    20190314_170005Hamberg.jpg 20190314_165914Hamberg.jpg 20190314_165835Hamberg.jpg
     
  8. wow

    wow Registered User
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    I have done the re-holeing thing many times. You are right about heating the end to anneal it. But, you do not want to re-heat it and harden it. It needs to be softer there so it will bend slightly when it is wound tight. The inner hole where it connects to the arbor is also annealed. Concerning the star cam, it is removable, but, like Shutt said, I seldom remove that type. There is little wear on that arbor, so it usually not necessary.
     
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  9. Kevin W.

    Kevin W. Registered User
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    I seldom remove those as well too.And i agree with Wow on what said about main springs too.
     
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  10. D.th.munroe

    D.th.munroe Registered User
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    That type of star cam looks like it should actually come off fairly easily, it appears to be the "cannon pinion" style that rotates on the arbor when you set the time and shouldn't be like too tight.
     
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  11. disciple_dan

    disciple_dan Registered User
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    I got the springs taken care of. I think they're fine.
    I'm getting ready to bush the bad bearings and I've noticed that this clock has been bushed in the past. Not a bad looking job too.
    Many of the bushings in the lower end are worn out. They need to be replaced.
    Can I just tap them out and put a like bushing in its place or will it be too loose a fit? Do I have to go to the next larger diameter?
    20190315_150149Hamberg.jpg
     
  12. wow

    wow Registered User
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    It usually works to just punch them out and use a new one with the proper ID for the pivot. If it’s loose I stake and tighten it up a bit. Some use loctite to secure the new bushing when necessary.
     
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  13. disciple_dan

    disciple_dan Registered User
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    When I hit the like button on you guys comments, does that let you know I have read it? Well, it means Thank you and I appreciate Your input.
     
  14. shutterbug

    shutterbug Super Moderator
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    The likes are nice, Dan :)
     
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  15. Uhralt

    Uhralt Registered User
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    Yes, we get notified. And you are welcome!

    Uhralt
     
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