Standard Electric Standard Electric Time Co. Thick Plate Movement

Discussion in 'Electric Horology' started by eskmill, Aug 19, 2015.

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  1. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User
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    Aug 24, 2000
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    The attached photo of a 120 beat Standard Electric Time Co. looks like an ordinary production movement. But there are differences in this example.

    1. The plates are a full 0.125 inch thick unlike the 0.075 thick regular production movements.
    2. Wheels and pinions are thicker, wider and more robust.
    3. Pawl springs are Berillium-Copper leaf type instead of bent spring wire.
    4. Electromagnets are 25 Ohm

    Other than its massive construction, the movement is simply a Standard Electric 120 beat minute wind battery movement.

    I have no knowledge of its provenance. Simply an eBay offering for two SET movements, the other a regular type SET 120 beat but clearly stamped BLOGETT CLOCK CO. BOSTON.

    One has to wonder why SET made this extra strong movement. :confused:
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Dave T

    Dave T Registered User
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    Dec 8, 2011
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    Sure would like to know what case housed this movement.
     
  3. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User
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    The best answer is that it may not have been used although it was badly soiled from ordinary storage. I detected evidence of limited use with minor pivot wear.

    According to Jeffrey Wood's comments I found in "Standard Electric Time Collector's Gallery," less than a hundred of these "beefy" movements were produced as salesmen's samples to compare with movements produced by competition which makes sense but not a purposeful reason. The increase in pivot hole length increases the aggregate friction making the movement slightly lower in efficiency and consequent shorter service life.
     
  4. Dave T

    Dave T Registered User
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    Dec 8, 2011
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    Interesting. On one hand you'd think that if it were a sample they would be misrepresenting their product!

    And the increased friction due to more surface wear isn't something I've considered. I always figured beefier parts would translate to longer life!
     
  5. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
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    Nov 4, 2002
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    I wonder if it would have/need a stronger spring than the thinner plate movements.
     
  6. Tinker Dwight

    Tinker Dwight Registered User

    Oct 11, 2010
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    Most clocks try to balance friction and wear by changing
    the diameter of the pivots.
    They are not always successful.
    Misrepresenting their product was not as big an issue in
    the time period these were made.
    Tinker Dwight
     

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