Standard Electric Time Co of (?)

eskmill

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How many variations of Standard Electric Time Company clock dials exist? Interestingly, there's one on eBay (225 990 9749) from a master clock, "Standard Electric Time Co. Waterbury CT."

It is noted that there were SETCO branches in Chicago, New York, Boston and San Francisco as well as Springfield Massachusetts.

Here's one for the books: SETCO of Berkeley CA
 

eskmill

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Aug 24, 2000
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How many variations of Standard Electric Time Company clock dials exist? Interestingly, there's one on eBay (225 990 9749) from a master clock, "Standard Electric Time Co. Waterbury CT."

It is noted that there were SETCO branches in Chicago, New York, Boston and San Francisco as well as Springfield Massachusetts.

Here's one for the books: SETCO of Berkeley CA
 

BILL KAPP

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Feb 19, 2002
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Les,
I don't know Std's history, but I can tell from the Eco Magneto Clock co's order books that from 1888 to 1904, they were ordering watchman devices for their clocks from Waterbury Conn, One order a little later that came from Boston and by 1913 they were ordering from Springfield.

If anyone runs across a Std Elec with the eco watchman's device, I sure would appreciate hearing about it.

Happy hunting,
Bill
 

H.Weiland

Deceased
Deceased
Feb 4, 2002
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www.execpc.com
Perhaps this dosen't directly apply, but I have a Hahl Pneumatic Clock Company catalog from the 1920's or so with S.E.T. master clocks which are indicated as having the "Hahl" name on them. My point is that evidently S.E.T. may have made sales to other companies which were labled for that firm. Is it possible that the "Berkeley" firm was not directly owned but a francise operation?? The ownership might not have been actually S.E.T.

I know that the branch office years ago here in Milwaukee was owned and operated directly by S.E.T.

Henry Weiland
 

eskmill

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Thanks Henry for your observation that SETCO may have entered into marketing agreements with other master clock makers.

I believe this is the case with the Pacific Electric Clock Company. Their master and slave clocks share close similarity to the SETCO in principle and design as well as use of identical parts. The oldest PE master clocks though have a movement with different shaped plates but many were replaced with SETCO movements as a maintenance procedure. The screw holes in the dial had to be repositioned to accomodate the SETCO "A frame" movement.

My question asked how many variations of SETCO dials exist today among collectors. Odd and old ones such as the SETCO Waterbury CT do surface occasionally.
 

Jeffrey R. Wood

Old Timer
Aug 27, 2000
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www.clockhistory.com
The Standard Electric Time Company started out in
Ansonia, CT, but there are no known "Ansonia" dials by
this firm. The earliest secondary dials are imprinted:
ELECTRIC TIME "Warner System", with no city name
given. Here is what's believed to be a complete list
of city names appearing on Standard Electric dials:

New Haven, CT, ca. 1890
Waterbury, CT, 1892-1911
Boston/New York/San Francisco, 1910-1912
Springfield Mass. (no comma), 1912-1920
Springfield, Mass., 1912-1940
California (only, NO city name)
Montreal, Canada (Branch factory opened 1926)
Berkeley, Calif., 1923-1929

Many dials, especially in the less common sizes, were
used beyond the dates given here-- that is, until the
supply ran out. The company was in Springfield until
1981, but did not print the city name on dials during
the later years. Before the move to Springfield,
manufacturing was done briefly in Foxboro, MA, with
office in Boston. The Boston/New York/San Francisco
dials originated at this time, but it is virtually
certain that they were not made in more than a very
few sizes. The painted Waterbury dials were done on
zinc by Seth Thomas and like many other Seth Thomas
dials, were extremely prone to flaking and often
replaced with Springfield dials later on. The New
Haven Clock Co. made some paper secondary clock dials
for Standard, which were glued to zinc dial pans.
These would absorb moisture, causing the adhesive to
react with the zinc and creating a lumpy surface. Many
slave clocks made circa 1900-1917 still have these
paper dials, while others have replacements, possibly
being of much later vintage than the clock.
Most of the paper dial clocks have labels inside,
indicating when and where they were made.
 

Joe Gensheimer

Registered User
Oct 9, 2000
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As I pointed out in my article in Bulletin 303, page 474, and in Bulletin 332, page 339, Standard Electric made clocks for Dey that were almost identical to those made for itself. Dey would have the dials printed with arabic numerals while Standard used Roman numerals.
 

SuzanneK

New Member
Sep 20, 2006
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Originally posted by Jeffrey R. Wood:
The Standard Electric Time Company started out in
Ansonia, CT, but there are no known "Ansonia" dials by
this firm. The earliest secondary dials are imprinted:
ELECTRIC TIME "Warner System", with no city name
given. Here is what's believed to be a complete list
of city names appearing on Standard Electric dials:

New Haven, CT, ca. 1890
Waterbury, CT, 1892-1911
Boston/New York/San Francisco, 1910-1912
Springfield Mass. (no comma), 1912-1920
Springfield, Mass., 1912-1940
California (only, NO city name)
Montreal, Canada (Branch factory opened 1926)
Berkeley, Calif., 1923-1929

Hi Jeffrey,
I have a clock that is Springfield Mass. but is stamped July 1941 on the back. It looks just like the one you have on your "my collection" webpage with the weird 2 but the case is painted brown. I'm not sure if it came that way or if someone painted it.
 

Jeffrey R. Wood

Old Timer
Aug 27, 2000
266
2
0
www.clockhistory.com
Brown was one of the stock colors at that time. Others were "library green", black and hospital white. Most school clocks acquired at least a little wall paint around the back edge of the case and/or specks of it here and there. Often when the walls were then painted a different color, the old wall paint was covered up by painting the entire case! Non-original paint may be a different shade and often has telltale dribbles, bumps and brush marks. It seems that the sloppiest painters were the ones hired to paint school classrooms, where most of these clocks were originally used.
 

Frank Lindauer

Registered User
Feb 15, 2005
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This will probably only confirm what you already know, but my SETCO slave clock above ourcomputer has a 12" roman dial marked "The Standard Electric Time Co. Springfield, Mass."

I had to install a universal motor; this clock has no second hand, but I don't know if that is correct. The oak case has an arched top.

Frank Lindauer
 

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