Staking set cleanup

1

107WestStreet

Just cleaned up a K&D staking set. Had to buff off some rust and debrey. Will the newly cleaned areas rust after buffing with steel wool. I would hate to add any oil that could infect parts, but what do you reccommend.
 

Roger Huegel

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Aug 24, 2000
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I just cleaned up two staking sets myself and then I sprayed them with WD40 and wiped off the excess with a cloth.
 

Andy Dervan

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Hello,

Typically coating items with a light film of oil after use is the traditional method to keep tools from rusting. Remember fingerprints actually leave a residue that is corrosive to metal.

WD-40 is a cleaner rather than a lubricant and is designed to eliminate water.

Andy Dervan
 

Roger Huegel

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Aug 24, 2000
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Andy
Reading from the back of the WD-40 can (condensed):
Lubricates
Moving parts...
Cleans
Most surfaces...
Protects
Against rust and corrosion...
Penetrates
To free stuck parts...
Displaces Moisture.
To restore wet parts...

One of the things that I enjoy doing is restoring old machinery and tools. WD-40 is great for cleaning and coating metal to protect it from rusting.

I've always said that you can fix most everything with a hammer, duct tape and WD-40 :)
 

burnz

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Jan 24, 2006
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WD-40 does all those things primarily due to its water displacing properties. If it can displace moisture than it can help keep away rust. It also contains "some" lubricating properties.

WD-40 stands for=== water displacement-trial number 40. That's how it got it's name. On the 40th. trial--they were satisfied with their product---hence the name---WD-40.
 

bobswatch

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Sep 3, 2004
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Hi Burnz:
Am I correct in saying that NASA wanted a product made to displace moisture on space ship parts ? As you state the water displacement 40th try ended the development process and the product made its way to the commercial market after they no longer used it.
Just my two cents on the subject.
Bob
 

burnz

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Don't know for sure about NASA etc. I do know that I read (can't remember where) along time ago the way that WD-40 arrived at it's name.
I actually was thinking it was a private venture.
 

burnz

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True--but we are not speaking of WD-40 on clock movements here. Only tools,equipment,machinery etc.
 

Timm

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I'm not absolutely sure, but I think I saw on the History Channel that WD-40 was developed near the end of WWII.
 

doc_fields

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WD-40 also makes a great fireball when thrown in the burn barrel. :biggrin: Everytime some idiot sprays their cuckoo clock with it, I'd like to take it from them and toss it there.
 
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BobC

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Jan 3, 2006
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The displace moisture concept is exactly correct. I had an old Dodge (many decades ago) that every time it rained it wouldn't start. If I'd pop the distributer cap and give it a quick squirt of WD-40, pop the cap back on it would start every time. WD-40 has also been used as a replacement for Ether to fire up an engine that would kick in cold weather. Non of this of course has anything to do with clocks or clock tools, just personal uses in years gone by.
 

Bill_NY

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May 23, 2005
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David-
It is called Cratex here. At least I believe that it is probably the same as your Garyflex.

Bill
 

SSWood

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Sep 27, 2004
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David, I had the same problem with rust,in my workshop .. well heavy condensation when the weather turned chilly, not the famous North Sea mist. Solved it by 'borrowing' the heater from my greenhouse .. has much lower thermostatic settings than a domestic one, .. right down to frost free .. so it was pretty economical to keep the temperature just above the dew point. Worth all of the few pounds ( under £20.00 I think ) from B&Q. May be worth a try.
Steve
 

technitype

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Feb 19, 2012
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107WestStreet;15606 said:
Just cleaned up a K&D staking set. Had to buff off some rust and debrey. Will the newly cleaned areas rust after buffing with steel wool. I would hate to add any oil that could infect parts, but what do you reccommend.
I use small foam strips called "rust blockers". These are self-stick strips that I place inside my staking tool box.

They are very effective at preventing rust.

The brand name is "Bullfrog".
 

technitype

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Andy Dervan;15608 said:
Hello,

Typically coating items with a light film of oil after use is the traditional method to keep tools from rusting. Remember fingerprints actually leave a residue that is corrosive to metal.

WD-40 is a cleaner rather than a lubricant and is designed to eliminate water.

Andy Dervan
WD-40 is no good for long-term prevention of rust, since it eventually evaporates off.
 

Kevin W.

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A better product that we use in the machine shop on metal surfaces is T9, Boeshield.
WD 40 is a very poor rust inhibitor.
Developed by Boeing.
 

technitype

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107WestStreet;15606 said:
Just cleaned up a K&D staking set. Had to buff off some rust and debrey. Will the newly cleaned areas rust after buffing with steel wool. I would hate to add any oil that could infect parts, but what do you reccommend.
Heck- getting oil on the watch parts would be the LEAST of my worries...getting oil off watch parts is EASY; getting rust off of watch parts is a B#TCH!!!
 

skippp66

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Confucious say:
If is moves.....duct tape it; if it doesn't move...WD40 it!
Skip, that Hamilton Nut
 

Firegriff

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I use a product from Berchwood Casey called "Barricade" it is made for rust prevention on long storage of Guns also works well on any tool comes in spray or drip can.
 

technitype

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Firegriff;955586 said:
WD-40 was good at keeping Nuclear warheads aluminum outer shell shinny.
...except, we are not talking about "keeping nuclear warheads shiney"- we are talking about preventing RUST on a staking tool set.:whistle:
 

LarFure

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BobC;15616 said:
The displace moisture concept is exactly correct. I had an old Dodge (many decades ago) that every time it rained it wouldn't start. If I'd pop the distributer cap and give it a quick squirt of WD-40, pop the cap back on it would start every time. WD-40 has also been used as a replacement for Ether to fire up an engine that would kick in cold weather. Non of this of course has anything to do with clocks or clock tools, just personal uses in years gone by.
The formula for WD-40 has been changed so it doesn't burn. I used to use it for starting diesel engines in cold weather, but now when you spray it in a engine it's like dumping water in the cylinders.

As far as protecting any watchmakers tools from rust, I found that soaking a rag with any light oil and using that to wipe off the tools will keep them from rusting. I do this to my staking set and lathe collets every other year. I've never had any trouble with rust since I started doing this.
 

BigAl

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Aug 24, 2011
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How about keeping the staking set in a plastic storage box and include a few packets of of silica gel?



BigAl
 

technitype

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You need to remember that staking sets are housed in wooden cases- and wood absorbs and holds moisture...

I have been using "Bullfrog rust-blockers" for several years, and I have not had any trouble with rust

BigAl;957249 said:
How about keeping the staking set in a plastic storage box and include a few packets of of silica gel?




BigAl
 

BigAl

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Each to their own technitype. If it works for you that is great.


Packets of silica gel come in a huge variety of sizes so it is easy to select one, or several, that will fit around whatever you want to protect while it is in its box, no matter what the box is made of. I suggested a plastic box merely as a suggestion. Any container with a lid is satisfactory.


If they get too damp the packets do not need much heat to dry them out ready for re-use. On top of a central heating radiator for a couple of hours is fine.


BigAl
 

Lassen Forge

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May 15, 2016
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I have a K&D set I just picked up and about 1/3 of the stakes are rusty - I decided to try Simichrome polish and a soft rag... while I do NOT recommend it for the longevity of the rags, with sufficient elbow grease they are once again smooth, shiny, and non-rusty. Of course the holes take some careful work with wood and a pic, but so far no blems.
 

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