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Staking Properly

Vint

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Oct 14, 2020
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I am now at the point in my clock repair hobby that I need to understand how to effectively stake. Here is a pic of a strike main wheel that I had to disassemble to file & clean up the ratchet teeth. When I put it back together the washer is loose and I see previous staking marks. Any advice is certainly welcome as to how I should go about staking the arbor. Thank you.

DB722ED3-4190-4E0D-A693-7A6FB31D1881.jpeg
 

Thomas Sanguigni

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Aug 22, 2018
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Before you reassemble that, smooth up that arbor end. It might grab the plate. The teeth need cleaned up too. Use a soft brass brush. What does the other side look like? You will need to rest it on something when staking. Staking will simply swell the brass to lock the pieces together.
 

Vint

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Before you reassemble that, smooth up that arbor end. It might grab the plate. The teeth need cleaned up too. Use a soft brass brush. What does the other side look like? You will need to rest it on something when staking. Staking will simply swell the brass to lock the pieces together.
Okay. How is staking performed exactly. Is there a tool I need? I’ve looked at staking kits online but before I go any further I need to know what I’m doing first,lol. I’ll go back and do a more thorough job of polishing the arbor ends.
 

shutterbug

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Staking tools come in a variety of designs. Some are pointed, some are more chisel like in appearance. You'll need a crows foot or some type of a solid riveting anvil that the arbor can pass through and still remain solidly anchored. A bench vise could be used to hold things. You'll have a collar that passes through the wheel, and that collar is then spread out with a staking tool of the proper size to displace the brass. As it spreads, the wheel is seated so it can't move.
When the wheel is removed, care has to be taken to not upset the collar more than is needed. Otherwise it could become unusable again.
 

Vint

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Staking tools come in a variety of designs. Some are pointed, some are more chisel like in appearance. You'll need a crows foot or some type of a solid riveting anvil that the arbor can pass through and still remain solidly anchored. A bench vise could be used to hold things. You'll have a collar that passes through the wheel, and that collar is then spread out with a staking tool of the proper size to displace the brass. As it spreads, the wheel is seated so it can't move.
When the wheel is removed, care has to be taken to not upset the collar more than is needed. Otherwise it could become unusable again.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Vint

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This helps me and gives me a good idea of what is involved. I will keep an eye on the collar as I stake. I appreciate your assistance Shutter.
 

shutterbug

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You're welcome! I edited your post to remove the double quote ;)
 

POWERSTROKE

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How do they stake these wheels at the factory where they seem to be better fastened?
 

shutterbug

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They probably have specialized equipment just for that task.
 

Nicko

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Are these the punches that you use to stake the collar (collet) to the arbour? Does the rounded end spread out brass of the collar?

DSCN0570.JPG DSCN0571.JPG
 

Nicko

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While we are talking punches What are these for? There is a heavy duty center punch and the other two have spring loaded centres

DSCN0573.JPG
 

Altashot

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The heavy duty centre punch is just that, a centre punch. It can also have other questionable uses.

The other 2 are hole closing punches. The spring loaded pin allows you to centre them on a hole while the outer ring, when the punch is struck, is supposed to upset metal back to towards the centre, thus, closing the hole, or at least, shrink it.

Their use is questionable too.

M.
 

shutterbug

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You'll need to look into a set of staking tools. What you have are hollow punches an hole closing punches. They are useful for many tasks in the shop, but not for staking. You might be able to make a few punches that will reach in and upset the brass where it needs it.
 

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