Spindle wear

Brento

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So my new 1942 Derbyshire Elect lathe has been taken apart. I dont know anything about spindle wear so i am curious what condition the spindle is in. I think it looks pretty good but i want advice. And now that i have it apart im curious to know if i should try to pursue and get the Hyspin E5 spindle oil from Mobil. If not i have on hand #10 that i can use. I am wondering if i should use #6 instead?

3C863615-9C66-4C3E-8B31-3DF9B3F5F69E.jpeg F1004D25-896F-4782-93CF-BA15E39DB3D5.jpeg
 

karlmansson

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There is some striping in there but it's hard to tell as it is pretty Dirty in the Pictures. That rear bearing though, is that bronze? I use Lorch 6mm lathes for my Watch work and they use hardened steel bearings in the spindle and cast iron in the headstock I Think. If not memory fails and there are pressed in steel liners in the headstock as well. I've never come across bronze in any case.

Hyspin is probably a good choice! I use Velocite No.6 in my lathes as I use that for my Aciera F1 spindle as well and have it on hand. I had been using both sewing machine oil and light motor oil Before that. The MOST important thing is to keep the bearings lubricated. Then you can worry about what to use to do it, but also bear in mind that cleanliness (keeping away from abrasives etc.) and reasonable loading play an important part for the bearing Health as well. Although, apparently Hyspin would allow you to apply heavier loads without losing lubricity. These spindles are for pretty low load applications after all so it's not the end of the World if you don't find a source for Hyspin E5.

Regards
Karl
 

Brento

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karlmansson yes i believe it is a bronze bushing. You are also correct that there are 2 hardened journals pressed inside the casting of the headstock. The bronze bushing takes most of the wear on the back end bc it is keyed and spins with the spindle. The bushing and the spindle on that end both i thought looked fantastic. The business end of the spindle i agree that there were some black darker lines on it. I can get another picture tonight after i wipe it off. I didnt want to leave it un oiled in my basement. The journal that the front spindle rides on also looked great so im not sure why just the lines on the spindle. I can get a source of Hyspin on ebay but a quart i think is like 30$ or something crazy shipping included. I can buy a 5 gallon bucket but id never use 5 gallons so im like up $h1ts creek without a paddle as they say lol. If i use velocite #10 or 6 should i clean the spindle if i happen to get the Hyspin after.
 

karlmansson

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I would recommend cleaning the spindle regularly, period :). If you don't use it too often, and keep it covered between uses, I think every 6 months would be plenty. The lubrication of theses spindles is a total loss system, meaning that the oil runs out from the bearing surfaces. So the oil has a cleaning action as well as it washes out debris. But yeah, mixing lubricants can get a bit hairy. Hard to tell how they will behave when combined. One might be a solvent to the other in a detrimental way.
 

Brento

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Well im think i might end up going with #6 hyspin is 13$ a quart plus 22$ shipping on ebay
 

wefalck

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I don't think the watchmakers of old really bothered too much with such 'high-tech' oils - they didn't have them anyway. The pre-war handbooks seem to talk of 'sewing-machine oil' or similar light oils. That's what I have been using for the past three decades without obvious detriment to the spindles and I was not the first one to use the lathes ;)
 

Brento

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Very true i ended up ordering a quart from amazon and ill have #6 on tuesday or wednesday just in time to try and play.
 

Betzel

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i believe it is a bronze bushing
I have seen many (and owned one) headstock with a pair of "soft" (bronze) outer bearings, or bushings, but they all had steel inner spindles, or cones. Does anyone know if Derbyshire actually made this rear cone? Or, was it a (pretty well done, if it's tight) repair?

I believe the soft bearings tolerate contamination better, and there may be other benefits, but I don't ever remember seeing only one. Just curious!
 

Betzel

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Always something new here. That's what makes it fun, eh?

Is there any chance it's cobalt/HSS and the oil is just making it look dark? Or is it really heavy and soft, so surely some sort of brass/bronze alloy?
 

wefalck

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Not sure about the American made ones, but the German made ones (Lorch, Schmidt & Co, Wolf & Jahn & Co., Boley incl. the ones they made for Paulson, and Leinen) all had what was called 'glass-hard' spindles and cones. I believe the cone were ground in situ, so removing them, would normally require to regrind them.

The problem with bronze bearings is that grit can become imbedded into them which then puts scars into the steel bearings. The prinziple as when you are charging a bell-metal polishing wheel with diamond powder.
 

Brento

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No it is definitely a bronze/brass sleeve. It is keyed to slide onto the spindle one way as well
 

Betzel

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OK, I've never seen just one, or a soft bearing used for a spindle/center, but who has seen it all? Surely a Derbyshire connoisseur around here will know and weigh in...

what was called 'glass-hard' spindles
Absolutely! I would never want to drop one. I have been careful and/or lucky :)

Though all of mine are German, and I'm not an expert, I believe the bronze is supposed to "eat" smaller contaminants to prevent the damage that would surely occur between two glass-hard bearings. I should have kept the generic American one I had for sawing, grinding and sharpening carbide, etc. but I let it go...toxic and destructive carbide dust, uggh.
 

Brento

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Once i found out this lathe dates back to 1942 i am cautious to even use it lol its like history is in my basement and idk what it had been through lol. Idk if they ever used lathes like these in the wars at all?
 

Betzel

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I think during the war, anything and everything got used by someone and somehow. Not much different today.

Most of these are built to last, several lifetimes, if well maintained. This one looks OK, even if odd to me. If it still spins true, oil it up and "learn to turn" :)
 

Brento

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The bed has seen some wear so jve got some #2 on it and ill oil it up every use.
 
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Slowmojoe

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Hey guys,

Sorry to resurrect an old thread- has anyone tried Archie perkins’ method of lapping cone bearings with valve lapping compound, with soft bronze bearings? Would it work the same?

Jon
 

Betzel

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I think we have dozens of threads on this one, as well as the oils to use in a lathe. If I can ask, what is the specific issue you are having that drives you to consider this?

I don't have his book handy, but would not recommend valve lapping compound under any circumstances. It is way too coarse and far too rapidly destructive. I would think particles would embed in the bronze then gouge the steel components to a rapid death. Good on '57 Chevy's though.

Most people will call me chicken (or worse), which is 100% fine, but the precision needed to lap any conical bearing set within a few microns such that spindle oil in a film unimaginably thin is the only suspension between them, is not likely attainable without laser guided, coolant spraying, self dressing grinding jigs that are probably only in use wherever Bergeon lathes are made. I wonder about those Vectors from China, but have never seen one. And it has been said (I think correctly) you can't finely "finish" lap mating parts to each other very well, it will groove both sides. And, with some, intentional grooves are cut in the female cones to channel the oil. Lapping these can thin or eliminate those channels.

Here's how they did it 70 years ago: Boley headstock bearings
 
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Slowmojoe

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I think we have dozens of threads on this one, as well as the oils to use in a lathe. If I can ask, what is the specific issue you are having that drives you to consider this?

I don't have his book handy, but would not recommend valve lapping compound under any circumstances. It is way too coarse and far too rapidly destructive. I would think particles would embed in the bronze then gouge the steel components to a rapid death. Good on '57 Chevy's though.

Most people will call me chicken (or worse), which is 100% fine, but the precision needed to lap any conical bearing set within a few microns such that spindle oil in a film unimaginably thin is the only suspension between them, is not likely attainable without laser guided, coolant spraying, self dressing grinding jigs that are probably only in use wherever Bergeon lathes are made. I wonder about those Vectors from China, but have never seen one. And it has been said (I think correctly) you can't finely "finish" lap mating parts to each other very well, it will groove both sides. And, with some, intentional grooves are cut in the female cones to channel the oil. Lapping these can thin or eliminate those channels.

Here's how they did it 70 years ago: Boley headstock bearings
Hi Betzel,

Thanks for your response. Yes I am aware of the various threads on this but my question is much more targeted - just to lapping soft cone bearings, which requires a different approach as compared to matching glass hard spindles and bearings.

I was looking at timesavers lapping compound, which is a type of non-charging abrasive that breaks down when used. Because of its physical properties it also has the reverse effect of lapping the softer material instead of the harder one.

The reason why I am asking these matters is because I have a lathe with scoring on its soft cone bearings, which in the current cleaning and teardown, I thought could use a refresh. Of course subject to whether it is even possible to achieve good results by hand - Perkins advocates for doing such lapping when bearings are worn.

Jon
 

karlmansson

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Here's how they did it 70 years ago: Boley headstock bearings
I've been looking at that entry on lathes.co.uk but I can't wrap my head around it. Certainly, that setup would work well for a rotating spindle but for grinding the fixed bearings in the headstock? That would call for a rotating jig that holds the grinding stone and follows the taper of the spindle.

As for the valve lapping compound, I think there are some around that are designed to break down and specifically not be embedded. I know that Robin Renzetti (who leaves close to nothing to chance) uses such an abrasive for final mating of two scraped surfaces after he's done scraping them. And that's usually cast iron he's using it on so certainly not glass hard. I'm sure such lapping compounds can be found in various grits. I used Autosol (Simichrome in certain countries) in the headstock of my 6mm Lorch that had some banding in the headstock bearings. Didn't get it all out but it improved the finish. You can dilute pastes with paraffin or kerosene to get a thinner film for lapping too. Just be sure to make the surfaces chemically clean before reassembling, oiling and running the lathe.

Best of luck!
Karl
 

Betzel

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OK, Joe. Fair enough ;-)

Old-school valve grinding compound is frightening. And, soft bronze bearings in watchmakers lathes are fairly rare. I wish I'd kept mine.

A clean lathe is always happy, especially if it has been dry for years, and if during your breakdown/inspection you saw drip lubrication holes, and no signs of abuse you should be fine. Such as: a clean spindle, minor lines (only in the bronze) that won't stop an axially sliding fingernail, no burn marks (like, from being run dry) or worn bearing surfaces from too much play. When re-assembled, adjusted and properly lubricated, if the spindle feels smooth, well aligned, not leaking (excessively, it is a total loss system that does weep) and has no mechanical issues like lateral or axial play, runout, noise, vibration, or running warm/hot to the touch, you have a fine machine. If you agree, you might consider just letting slow, natural surface wear "heal" the softer surfaces to fine-conformance to the hard spindle. It's an amazing thing. You may need to tighten it up occasionally, but it will take time for the oil to wash out microscopic self-lapping residue. I don't know which spindle oil is right for soft bearings, but lighter seems to be the consensus if it has good lubricity. If it weeps out the sludge and everything stays cool, you should be fine. Very high speed heat will be delayed; by the time you detect it, overheating may occur. Go slow, don't let go?

But, if the grooves in bronze are deep, or the steel is scored, then contaminants were hard, did not break down, or did not embed correctly, etc. If you can feel the particles, you may be able to get them back out (?) Negative holes are better than positives, and the damage may still heal. I would scrape lightly in an axial direction and then try self healing and see, rather than compound. If you still want to use compound, less is probably better. Clean the holes and grooves with mineral spirits, etc. The cones and split-nut will travel inward only so far.

Karl, I have looked at that jig a few times and thought the exact same thing. It had to rotate to grind cones fixed to the bed. Looking at it should stop us from trying this at home, but most do not see the jig until afterwards, like me ;-)

[Also, I don't know what happens when one lapped side is bronze. Robrenz (I am also a fan) is doing steel on steel, or iron on iron. Love that 3 plate self-referencing surface plate video...]
 
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Betzel

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When I saw this thing on eBay, it reminded me of this thread, though I think the cone above looks very well made.

Now, I really can no longer say I've never seen a brass cone in a hard bearing lathe before. Lightning strikes again. Note the spindle on this is also, uh, reversed to make it a "righty," as all handles (should always?) face away from an operator. Bucket o' woe for some buyer.

If I ever refurbished an old watchmakers lathe, I would make new gravity-fed hollow bearings from bronze, channel them, then true up the spindle by grinding between centers, and microlap. Too old, not going to happen...

BrassCone.jpg
 

wefalck

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For some reason German watchmakers seem(ed) to prefer to have the headstock on the right. Perhaps because in the old days they were run off a hand-crank and they found cranking with the right hand easier. Too me cranking with one hand and using a graver with other seems quite like a juggler's act - as I have such crank I should give it a try one day.

To account for that, the German manufacturers all seem to offered left-hand and right-hand headstocks and matching lever- or screw-tailstocks for D-bed lathes (the simple tailstock can be used on either side, of course). And as a result most of the second-hand D-bed lathes that pop up on the German market are right-handed. People today turn them around and work on them with the flat to to front. Of course, all lever then face the 'wrong' way around.
 

Betzel

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I've always admired the range of accommodations they made, and I think you are correct about the crank (both being for a right handed person to operate, thus needing the left to cut or operate a slide, and the whole thing being a juggling act). The American sewing machine treadle did not have the fine speed control of the hand crank, but was maybe easier for an average to use? Not easy to be a Jedi Master.

I think the one in the photo was born a righty. Then, it was flipped around to become a lefty, with the handles (and bed flat) 'wrongly' facing in. OK, but then someone changed the hand-finished spindle into the headstock (backwards) to make it into a righty again. Ahrgh! Who knows...
 

wefalck

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If there was no electricity, I would go for a sewing machine stand - in fact treadle lathes were very common until he 1930s, when small electric motors became more common. The treadle wouldn't drive the lathe directly, but a transmission mounted to the rear of the stand.

Old Lorch, Schmidt & Co. or Wolf, Jahn & Co. catalogues up to the 1940s offer for their bench lathes and milling machines stands that had either a treadle or an electric motor.
 

karlmansson

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I've switched over my Lorch Geneva lathe to a handwheel drive. Mostly because I never to any large (everything is relative) work on it anymore since I got my bench lathe. It's dead quiet now and cranking and turning at the same time isn't as hard as you might think at first. I do crank with my left hand though, and I'm right handed. I have a LOT more use of my increased control than the slightly higher strength in my dominant hand.

Regards
Karl
 

wefalck

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You are musician, aren't you ? You guys are used to do different things at different rythms with both hands - I would find cranking with one hand at a certain speed and turning the crank on the slide-rest at a different speed difficult.

It's quite strange, how old practices persist in some trades, even generations after they have become quite obsolete. Already catalogues of the 1920s recommend to get an electric drive, if you have any electricity at all. For the others they still offered the hand-cranks.
 

karlmansson

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You are musician, aren't you ? You guys are used to do different things at different rythms with both hands - I would find cranking with one hand at a certain speed and turning the crank on the slide-rest at a different speed difficult.

It's quite strange, how old practices persist in some trades, even generations after they have become quite obsolete. Already catalogues of the 1920s recommend to get an electric drive, if you have any electricity at all. For the others they still offered the hand-cranks.
Oh, I didn't think to mention that. I don't use the hand crank together with a compound, only with a graver. I use my fixed faceplate with handcrank though. It's been a while since I did it though, and I may have lost my touch. Then again, I don't practice on my saxophone as much either. That's probably why. :)
 

Dells

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It’s surprising how many people still use the hand crank, I have to hold the graver in both hands as I have gout in both hands, so my lathe is run by a Multifix motor they are able to run in both directions and speed can be very easily changed with a leaver.
 

D.th.munroe

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I like experimenting with the old ways, like handwheel and I still use a turns with a bow.
Back to bronze bearings for a second I thought they were, after a bit of messing around wasting time grinding when making them, they ended up just cutting them close and hammering them in to the bearings for a final finish/forming.
Dan
 

dave-b

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I like experimenting with the old ways, like handwheel and I still use a turns with a bow.
Back to bronze bearings for a second I thought they were, after a bit of messing around wasting time grinding when making them, they ended up just cutting them close and hammering them in to the bearings for a final finish/forming.
Dan
I cannot remember where I read it, but hammering in the bronze bearings did occur at least once.One of the workshop fitters surprised the other workers by coming back after lunch and doing just that. Whether it was frustration or experimentation I don't know , but I bet it showed where adjustment was needed.(it probably helped)
 

wefalck

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Hammering seems to be a rather brutal and uncontrolle approach. I would rather think that the bearings were pressed in to ensure concentricity. They would then have been ground to close to the final fit in a jig, to ensure alignment with the lathe axis. The finaly fitting would have been done by lapping together the spindle with its bearings. The tailstock(s) would have been fitted in the same set-up.

However, on D-bed lathes much of this was done on rigid jigs, so that the parts were interchangeable for most practical requirements - hence, they are rarely, if ever, numbered in batches, unlike for the WW-bed lathes.
 

dave-b

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Hammering seems to be a rather brutal and uncontrolle approach. I would rather think that the bearings were pressed in to ensure concentricity. They would then have been ground to close to the final fit in a jig, to ensure alignment with the lathe axis. The finaly fitting would have been done by lapping together the spindle with its bearings. The tailstock(s) would have been fitted in the same set-up.

However, on D-bed lathes much of this was done on rigid jigs, so that the parts were interchangeable for most practical requirements - hence, they are rarely, if ever, numbered in batches, unlike for the WW-bed lathes.
Wefalck, I meant it would help at least with his frustration! There must have been some lathes where after all the factory processes were carried out, it still failed final inspection. Hammering on the bearing/spindle may not help with that lathe, but would help for the next one if it showed up the fault.
 

Betzel

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However, on D-bed lathes much of this was done on rigid jigs, so that the parts were interchangeable for most practical requirements - hence, they are rarely, if ever, numbered in batches, unlike for the WW-bed lathes.
Huh. Maybe I'm misunderstanding. I figured they used jigs, but thought the Geneva's were "all" made up in matched pairs? The Wolf Jahn I really love is put away stateside, but it has assembly/finish numbered headstock, tailstock, and bed with two digits. The headstock is identically numbered internally as well, so I thought maybe one man made the whole thing? Though the plating isn't perfect, the bearings are, so I felt lucky to find it. The ones I have here (not as nice) are W-J style, not trademarked, and hit with a punch (three dots, three slashes, etc.) to match the head and tail. Numbering any well-made bed was just for fun, I think? I thought these "generics" I have were older, or did not pass cosmetic inspection, so they were not trademarked or numbered, but they were still matched. Maybe they sold them on the side? Not all common tailstocks I have will hold a blade flat, so there are variations. I thought this was why they were all originally matched?

On the WW's, I only have Leinen and one Boley hammertone (1950's? --I like the nickel better). I know the Leinens were intentionally interchangeable and not numbered, even the older ones with the brass oil cups and dust rings. Were the older WW's (from the US?) numbered to match components as a set?

Dells, the hand crank with a motor is a great idea, as the wheel acts like a flywheel to provide a lot of balanced torque (relatively) even with a small motor turning slowly once it's moving, kind of like a gyroscope. Takes up space though...

The "feel" of bronze bearing is also very nice. Smooth. Seems to have a damping effect, but that may just be psychological :)
 

measuretwice

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Hammering seems to be a rather brutal and uncontrolle approach. I would rather think that the bearings were pressed in to ensure concentricity. They would then have been ground to close to the final fit in a jig, to ensure alignment with the lathe axis. The finally fitting would have been done by lapping together the spindle with its bearings. The tailstock(s) would have been fitted in the same set-up.
I agree with you on the hammering, but not on how tapers are finished in their manufacture. Applying abrasive between two parts is shade tree stuff, if something is to be lapped its done with a lap which is a cutting tool.

There are two main approaches to lapping, loose abrasive or using a charged lap. The loose abrasive way works with cylindrical items because the lap and work get abraded and a combination of the axial movement between the lap and work and the nature of the geometry produces roundness to a very high tolerance. For example I can lap bores (and done so many times) to a high level of accuracy because the lap is axially relative to the work. I just did a Schaublin 70 tailstock and its a marvel how well it works - on my micron dial bore gauge I don't see 1 micron variation in dia along the bore.

You don't use loose abrasive other types of lapping I'm familiar with (working metal that is, optics are outside of my purview). In every other case (other than cylindrical) you make lap to a very accurate bit of geometry - grinding, scraping etc. You then charge the lap and use it as a cutting tool. The lap itself is never worn away or even touched - the work touchs embedded abrasive not the laps parent material.

In either case of course the lap is always softer than the work so material embeds in it and not the work

Lapping tapers won't work like a cylinder as there is no axial movement between the work and lap. The loose abrasive approach would make a mess of it - remember loose abrasive abrades both work and lap and MUST have the averaging that axail movement provides (and is impossible with a taper) to work.

There is no easy way out of pooched biconical lathe bearings. getting the two different tapers in the same piece to mate perfectly is about the trickiest machining task I can imagine. I've not tried this yet, but the best I've come up with is to grind seperate sets of laps for the 3 and 45 degree tapers out of some cast iron, charge them, and then lap the bearing tapers with lots of iterative test fitting with the shaft. Even this would require a lot of too avoid rings and unevenness, would be slow work and need several laps for the progression of grit sizes. Ugh, the sane among us would just prowl ebay for one in better shape
 

dave-b

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On another site, this problem of grinding 2 tapers together causing rings etc. was discussed. It was observed that grinding car engine valves or glass bottle stoppers was done with loose abrasive and is perfecly suitable. I know a watchmakers lathe is to a different standard, but the principle seems sound.
 
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D.th.munroe

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I should say I wasn't suggesting using a hammer, just was a historical tidbit I read somewhere, if even anecdotal.
 

Betzel

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I think the old timers used fine oilstone paste on two mating steel surfaces for a final 1-1 fit, but only a few turns by hand to "grey" so it would roll smoothly. After break-in, they cut the register on the spindle nose, then sent it to the next guy for inspection?

Pooched is a totally different story from freshly precision ground out of a jig. Sane is right. With reduction in ID and increase in the OD, the cones would drop in too far for the rear cone's keyway, or come too close. Not to mention the lost oil grooves.

If you were insane, scrap the steel outers, make yourself some bronze under-bored sleeves to replace, and press them (or hammer them carefully!) in. A reduced diameter spindle might just fit with room to grow? When all the good oldies are gone, someone could offer this as a tool restoration service for all the pooched machines out there.

Or, listen to Jerry, get a modern lathe and go do some good work? ;-)
 

measuretwice

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On another site, this problem of grinding 2 tapers together causing rings etc. was discussed. It was observed that grinding car engine valves or glass bottle stoppers was done with loose abrasive and is perfectly suitable.
It is suitable for those applications, its call matched piece lapping. However I don't think is sound or relevant to watch lathe bearings. Bottle stops and valves don't rotate and aren't hydrodynamic bearings. Think of how a hydrodynamic bearings works - hows that going to work if when viewd as a cross section, the tapers aren't straight lines?

I bet these bearings were done with rotating abrasives, probably cylindrical laps for the finish treatment in a fixture where the lap and the bearing both rotated and the lap moved in and out. Much like internal cylindrical grinding. Said fixture/machine would have two axis for the two angles. Because the laps would move in their axis, you get the averaging and a straight sided cone. I would like to know more about how the factory did this work, it seems something not well (or at all) documented.
 
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dave-b

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That bearing does not look "pooched" to me. Bottle stoppers etc. show no sign of rings on their surface from heavy grinding. The bearing in question is hardly likely to have any measurable difference in size afer a few hand turns with a fine non-embedding abrasive, nor are the straight sides of the cones lilely to be affected.
 
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D.th.munroe

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I would like to know more about how the factory did this work, it seems something not well (or at all) documented.
I would as well, I've read alot of the books but don't remember the details of that operation being discussed.

A machinist told me he personally used stone wheels, I guess on a toolpost grinder because of the loose abrasive arguments. Whether the bearings were good or the lathe was accurate after I have no idea.
 

wefalck

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No pictures from the Lorch, Schmidt & Co. and Wolf, Jahn, & Co. factories in Frankfurt seem to have survided and their archives seem to been lost, when they folded in in the early 1960s. The Lorch factory building still exists - by chance I once found myself standing in front of it.

As Levin and Boley are still in business, they probably would know, but I am not sure they would tell, how the fitting was/is done.

I should actually browse my machine tool books from the 1930s to see, whether anything is mentioned in them.
 

dave-b

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I found the reference to hammering bronze bearings. Google- "adjusting bearings on a watchmakers lathe" - the antique time site. Sorry I don't know how to link.
 

wefalck

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It's this link: https://www.tapatalk.com/groups/horologist/adjusting-bearings-on-a-watchmakers-lathe-t899.html, but it refers to an old BHI page I think.

... and the guy didn't hammer the bearings into the headstock, but he drove a spindle into the bearings set already in the tail-stock. This is something rather different. I just explained the reason a few minutes ago in another thread here on Lorch lathe dissassembly. It would align and harden the bronze bearing - if done in a controlled way.
 
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Betzel

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AFAIK, this is the only surviving image Boley headstock bearings

If there are other stories or images from other manufacturers, my curiosity continues?

We are not talking pyramids here, but how did they get things so effing perfect in those old days?
 
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measuretwice

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AFAIK, this is the only surviving image Boley headstock bearings
thats a great image....of all the seemingly 100's of manufactures of these things and all the people that worked there its a shame there isn't more of a record.

Its close what I proposed and how they were done except they do the clever bit of a single lap/grinding point. Note how for each taper the lap is angled and moved on its axis vs taper on taper.

Its topical for me as I have a wreck of a Schaublin 70 I'm reconditioning and some ham fisted lout let it run without oil ruining the bearing. I'd thought I would scrape in a new bronze bearing, but the diagram you posted as got me thinking....
 
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D.th.munroe

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Its topical for me as I have a wreck of a Schaublin 70 I'm reconditionng and some ham fisted lout let it run without oil ruining the bearing.
For me as well, I have a wrecked Rivett and a Moseley lathe here that need help.
The moseley, same as your shaublin, ran without oil, but chrome and pully still look new.
And the rivett someone hammered it together with the key in the wrong spot, oddly the spindle nose isn't hard and is now pretty dented.
 

dave-b

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It's this link: https://www.tapatalk.com/groups/horologist/adjusting-bearings-on-a-watchmakers-lathe-t899.html, but it refers to an old BHI page I think.

... and the guy didn't hammer the bearings into the headstock, but he drove a spindle into the bearings set already in the tail-stock. This is something rather different. I just explained the reason a few minutes ago in another thread here on Lorch lathe dissassembly. It would align and harden the bronze bearing - if done in a controlled way.
Who suggested hammering bearings into the headstock?
 

D.th.munroe

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I did say "them into the bearings" instead of "spindle into the bearings" in my original post, thinking maybe a bronze bearing hammered into a steel bearing then cut to fit the spindle would be similar.
 

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