Spindle Issues - Have I Messed Up Again??

howardindevon

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Jan 14, 2021
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Spindle Issues - Have I Messed Up Again??

I stripped a Cuckoo Clock Mechanism recently and was left with the Birdstock and the Spindle still attached to the back plate. See picture 1. I had partially removed the Spindle, before being advised by a Member, that it was not really necessary.

So then, having cleaned everything, I want now to reassemble. The first thing, obviously, is to reposition the Spindle back to where it was. Problem is - where exactly was it?? I used a couple of sections of thin tube, to support the Gear side and the other over the Spindle, to tap down onto the brass Bush.

The inevitable happened! One tap was too little and the whole Spindle was still very loose. Two taps was the same, three taps and it was still slack. Four taps, (you guessed it) now more or less solid. It took a further 15 minutes with various impliments to get the Spindle moving again. The evidence is there, in the form of scratchs on the plate and a circular score mark. Picture 2 and 3.

My questions are thus. What is the best way to manipulate this component in future? How do we know exactly what clearance is required? If I can now turn the Spindle by hand with no great friction will it be OK? Should I put a dot of clock Oil at the junction?

Please advise. Thank you, Howard


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Uhralt

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Sep 4, 2008
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The arbor/pinion combination should move without resistance or the clock will have power problems. In order to avoid getting it too close to the plate, causing binding, you can slip something very thin underneath the pinion before you drive it down. I use a thin blade of feeler gauge for that purpose. These are available at auto parts stores. Something like 0.3 mm might be fine.

Uhralt
 

dickstorer

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Oct 19, 2010
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Howard, you will find that there are many ways to get the job done. What you are calling the spindle is the center wheel arbor and its pinion. Lots of repairers do not remove the canon pinion saying its not necessary, well it isn't, but in my opinion it makes the repair go forth better if you do remove it. It is easy to remove the canon pinion and you need not worry about its position, it goes on any where. Support the plate with center wheel on your crows foot, apply a little heat, tap it with your wooden mallet an it will almost drop off. Putting it back is just the reverse. It will not go on to far and cause it not to have any endshake. The center wheel arbor has a small shoulder to prevent the pinion from going on to far. Putting the minute hand on in the right position should not be a problem. There will be a lot of different opinions and most will disagree with my way but it has worked for me many years.
 

Kevin W.

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Apr 11, 2002
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I think many times its what works for you. Not a one size fits all. dont remove the cannon pinion, and thats just me, my way of doing things. Learning clock parts terminology is a good thing, makes things easier to understand.
 

howardindevon

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Jan 14, 2021
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Dawlish, Devon, UK
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The arbor/pinion combination should move without resistance or the clock will have power problems. In order to avoid getting it too close to the plate, causing binding, you can slip something very thin underneath the pinion before you drive it down. I use a thin blade of feeler gauge for that purpose. These are available at auto parts stores. Something like 0.3 mm might be fine.

Uhralt
I realised afterwards, that a shim may have been a better solution, than just guessing the clearance.

In future, I probably will leave the part in place.

Thanks, all of you, for your advice and tips. Regards, Howard
 

Dick Feldman

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Sep 1, 2000
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My suggestion for "in the future" would be to grab a book from your local library and learn the terminology so that we are speaking the same language. The "spindle" you speak of in this post is called the center arbor.
Dick
 

Royce

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Oct 8, 2018
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I realised afterwards, that a shim may have been a better solution, than just guessing the clearance.

In future, I probably will leave the part in place.

Thanks, all of you, for your advice and tips. Regards, Howard
Howard,
Bottom-line, enjoy this new hobby of yours, like I do. You will make mistakes as it is definitely a learning process. As you have already found out, there are some extremely knowledgeable people on this MB who are more than happy to share their knowledge and assist you with any issues you may have. Have fun!!
Royce
 
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howardindevon

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Jan 14, 2021
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Howard,
Bottom-line, enjoy this new hobby of yours, like I do. You will make mistakes as it is definitely a learning process. As you have already found out, there are some extremely knowledgeable people on this MB who are more than happy to share their knowledge and assist you with any issues you may have. Have fun!!
Royce
Thanks for that! It certainly is a learning curve but I really am enjoying the challenge. BTW, you make some great automobiles with your friend Rolls.
Regards, Howard
 

howardindevon

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Jan 14, 2021
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Dawlish, Devon, UK
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My suggestion for "in the future" would be to grab a book from your local library and learn the terminology so that we are speaking the same language. The "spindle" you speak of in this post is called the center arbor.
Dick
Dick,
Mea Culpa, Mea Culpa. Don't be too hard - still learning. I can speak English, French, German and Dutch. Best regards, Howard
PS what I have initially called a "Cam" in my last post I understand is now a "Gathering Pallet". I will ammend my post now.
 
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