Help Source for replacement glass for an antique Seikosha Box Regulator

captainclock

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Hello everyone a couple of months back I had bought on Facebook Market Place a couple of early 20th century Japanese Box Regulator Clocks to try and restore (the cases on them had some damage to them, specifically in the crown molding area, and the door on one of them.)

One of the clocks a Seikosha Box Regulator from about 1920-1925 or so that I was trying to repair some damage to the door where some of the trim on the inside of the door that held the lower glass that was marked "Seikosha" in gold lettering using the typical "Regulator" font type of the time period in place came loose.
Unfortunately the guy that works with me from a local organization that works with people with disabilities who likes to pack a huge backpack with him to bring his work supplies and other items with him wasn't paying attention to where he was swinging his backpack when he was taking it off and knocked the door from the aforementioned clock that I had sitting on the top of an old console radio to let the glue dry on the door frame when I was gluing it back together, and ended up breaking the lower glass on the door (the hardest part to source for the clock of course.)

I've looked all over ebay and elsewhere and I can't find any old Seikosha Box Regulators that had the same style of case as the one I have for sale on ebay or anywhere else for that matter so I could try to source a replacement lower glass for the clock's door.

Does anyone on here know of a place where I could source a replacement lower glass of the type I'm looking for or have an old Seikosha Box Regulator clock from the 1920s or thereabouts that they could send the case my way for parts if they have one in their bone yard that's in need of a home?

Thanks for your help in this matter.

See picture below to see what the clock in question looks like and what the glass in question that I need looked like.

Seikosha Clock wall clock.jpg
 

JTD

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Sep 27, 2005
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This might be hard to replace. How badly was the glass broken? If it was in two or three large pieces you might be able to glue it together using the special glass glue used by museum conservators.

It's not perfect, but if the breaks are clean it does give quite good and near invisible results.

Others may have better ideas.

JTD
 

Simon Holt

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Just a thought: get a piece of glass cut at your local glass supplier. Then create the lettering design on a computer. Then find someone with a cutting machine (for cutting sticky-backed vinyl) who can either cut you a set of letters, or cut you a stencil that you can use to apply paint by spray or brush.

If none of that makes sense, just ask! I'm renowned for being vague... :)

Simon
 

wow

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Yes, finding an original glass like that one is going to be nearly impossible. If you have enough glass left to glue it like JTD suggested, you could cut another glass and use the broken one as a templet and paint or have someone paint the letters on.
 

captainclock

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Unfortunately the glass was shattered beyond repair.
My copy of microsoft word has hundreds of fonts with it, so maybe I could see if I could find a font that comes close to the original and then use the "word art" function of microsoft word to create the "arched" effect that was used in the original "Seikosha" mark on the glass and make a water-slide decal to put onto a piece of glass cut to the proper size?
 

demoman3955

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I bet if you took that photo to a vinyl guy, he could copy the lettering as was mentioned into a stencil and either paint it or even use gold leaf for it. Ive done gold leaf, and its easy and cheap.
 

tracerjack

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The letters are not simply arched, but are also skewed. I think you would need a design program to recreate the lettering properly for a water slide decal. If you have a full size scan, I can recreate the lettering in Adobe InDesign. If that is something you would like to do, PM me.
 

captainclock

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I actually had a member here PM me a listing on a site called Bonanza that had a Seikosha Drop Octagon Regulator door glass that had the same style of lettering and was similar size (except for the triangle part on the bottom, that I could just cut off to make it work in my clock) that I just bought, so we'll see when it comes if the width of the rectangular part and height (with the triangular base removed) will work with my clock.

If nothing else I could use the glass I just bought as a template for the lettering, and as you said have a glass shop then cut some glass to the correct size and then have a vinyl or silkscreen shop stencil on the letters using the glass I just bought for the lettering and styling template.
 
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demoman3955

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I actually had a member here PM me a listing on a site called Bonanza that had a Seikosha Drop Octagon Regulator door glass that had the same style of lettering and was similar size (except for the triangle part on the bottom, that I could just cut off to make it work in my clock) that I just bought, so we'll see when it comes if the width of the rectangular part and height (with the triangular base removed) will work with my clock.

If nothing else I could use the glass I just bought as a template for the lettering, and as you said have a glass shop then cut some glass to the correct size and then have a vinyl or silkscreen shop stencil on the letters using the glass I just bought for the lettering and styling template.
Ive actually been thinking about trying silk screening onto glass. I make tee shirts using a silk screen machine, and i see no reason why it wouldnt work for glass. The only difference would be paint instead of ink.
 

tracerjack

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Silk screening metal or glass requires offset screening. The screen has to be slightly above the surface, then as the ink is pressed into the screen, it contacts the metal or glass. The screen must come off the surface quickly in order not to bleed the edges of the lettering. Screening cloth, which is the easiest (screen lays on the cloth), wasn't that easy for me. Not trying to discourage you, it is a "just so you know" kind of thing. It's why I went to filmless water slide decals. Way easier. You do have several options, which is nice. Hope it all works out.
 
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captainclock

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Silk screening metal or glass requires offset screening. The screen has to be slightly above the surface, then as the ink is pressed into the screen, it contacts the metal or glass. The screen must come off the surface quickly in order not to bleed the edges of the lettering. Screening cloth, which is the easiest (screen lays on the cloth), wasn't that easy for me. Not trying to discourage you, it is a "just so you know" kind of thing. It's why I went to filmless water slide decals. Way easier.
That's what I meant, I was just trying to get the point across that I had found a replacement glass that should work with some modification and if not it should work as a guide at least for some sort of shop to make a new glass with using the replacement glass I found to copy the stylized "Seikosha" wording onto the new piece of glass.

Although silkscreening was the method of choice used by all of the old American fan manufacturers like Emerson, GE, Hunter, Westinghouse, Victor, R & M, etc., when they made the cage badges for their fans in the early to mid 20th century, next time you see an old electric table fan at an antique store or auction or flea market take a look at the badges and you'll see what I mean. :=
 
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captainclock

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Well I got the glass for my clock today, and unfortunately its slightly too narrow for the glass opening in my clock to be used even with cutting the bottom part off, so I guess that means I'll have to go to Plan "B" and use the glass I just bought and take it to a vinyl shop as was suggested by demoman that can take and recreate the lettering off the glass I have onto a new piece of glass cut to the proper size of the opening.
 

lwalper

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Decals are easy enough to make too. You've got a good picture there. If you can get a high-res image of the text in question, clean the image up if you need to with Photoshop (or whatever you've got), reverse the image and print it on plain paper. Paint it with some acrylic decoupage medium (Mod Podge or such like), let it dry thoroughly. Soak the paper in water, position the art on your glass, rub the paper off. Just follow the directions on the decoupage medium. Easy enough. You can do this with either ink jet or laser printers.

You might actually be able to get the art from clocks@seikoinstruments.com. Send them the image of what you have and they might be able to help you out.
 
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