Something missing?.

James Lucas

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Aug 25, 2020
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Hello all.. Two questions.. Why isn't the main wheel driving the hour wheel? How is the cam adjusted to strike at the hour?

Thank you,
James

IMG_1138.jpg IMG_1240.jpg IMG_1241.jpg IMG_1242.jpg IMG_1243.jpg IMG_1244.jpg IMG_1245.jpg IMG_1246.jpg IMG_1247.jpg
 

bruce linde

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nothing looks out of place from the photos, but that's not the same as video of what's happening.

if you move the minute hand around, does the hour hand follow?

if you exert force on the chain wheel.... does it spin freely or turn the pinion that drives the next wheel?

is there any kind of tension washer under the motion works?
 

leeinv66

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Why would you adjust the cam? Wouldn't you adjust the position of the hands? These are passing strike (the bell is struck once on the hour they do not count the hours), so it should be just a case of moving the hands to the right position when it strikes.

The three pronged tension washer under the wheel that drives the cannon pinion allows the wheel to slip so you can adjust the time once the hands are in the correct position.
 
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James Lucas

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Aug 25, 2020
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nothing looks out of place from the photos, but that's not the same as video of what's happening.

if you move the minute hand around, does the hour hand follow?

if you exert force on the chain wheel.... does it spin freely or turn the pinion that drives the next wheel?

is there any kind of tension washer under the motion works?
Bruce, Sorry for the delay in getting back to you.. The hour hand does follow the minute hand only when it's move by hand....The chain wheel does drive the second wheel however, after closer inspection, the center arbor is just spinning in the hour shaft that's inside the cannon tube and not driving the minute wheel.
 

James Lucas

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Aug 25, 2020
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Why would you adjust the cam? Wouldn't you adjust the position of the hands? These are passing strike (the bell is struck once on the hour they do not count the hours), so it should be just a case of moving the hands to the right position when it strikes.

The three pronged tension washer under the wheel that drives the cannon pinion allows the wheel to slip so you can adjust the time once the hands are in the correct position.
I've been trying to make the adjustment without any luck.. It still strikes about five minutes early.. Obviously I'm not doing it correctly... Look forward to further instruction..

Thanks again
James
 

Willie X

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The 'drop off point' is adjusted by moving the hand on its hub, as already stated by Peter in post #3. The lack of hand clutch action is a separate issue. I suspect this clock has been 'monkeyed with'. :)

Where did that 'three leg washer' shown hanging on the winding arbor (in photo #5) come from??

Willie X
 
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James Lucas

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Aug 25, 2020
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nothing looks out of place from the photos, but that's not the same as video of what's happening.

if you move the minute hand around, does the hour hand follow?

if you exert force on the chain wheel.... does it spin freely or turn the pinion that drives the next wheel?

is there any kind of tension washer under the motion works?
nothing looks out of place from the photos, but that's not the same as video of what's happening.

if you move the minute hand around, does the hour hand follow?

if you exert force on the chain wheel.... does it spin freely or turn the pinion that drives the next wheel?

is there any kind of tension washer under the motion works?
Bruce, I'm not tech sav
nothing looks out of place from the photos, but that's not the same as video of what's happening.

if you move the minute hand around, does the hour hand follow?

if you exert force on the chain wheel.... does it spin freely or turn the pinion that drives the next wheel?

is there any kind of tension washer under the motion works?
if you move the minute hand around, does the hour hand follow?

if you exert force on the chain wheel.... does it spin freely or turn the pinion that drives the next wheel?

is there any kind of tension washer under the motion works?
[/QUOTE]
 

Thomas Sanguigni

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I worked on one of these Stieger units. I don't recall seeing a spider tension spring. I've attached some before pictures. Maybe it will help you. I did not have any problems, and the repair went well. I do remember it needed a lot of bushings.



013.JPG

009.JPG

011.JPG
 

Vernon

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Hi James, I have one in the shop like yours. However, it doesn't have that 3 legged tension spring. In post one picture 9, that part should slide onto the center shaft in front of the assembled front plate. Mine "clicks" into position and adds the tension so that the hands will move. Not the best design as the reason it's here is the hands wouldn't work. Reposition that part shown in (edit) picture 9 of post one to correct the strike.

Vernon
 
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James Lucas

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Aug 25, 2020
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Hi James, I have one in the shop like yours. However, it doesn't have that 3 legged tension spring. In post one picture 9, that part should slide onto the center shaft in front of the assembled front plate. Mine "clicks" into position and adds the tension so that the hands will move. Not the best design as the reason it's here is the hands wouldn't work. Reposition that part shown in post 9 to correct the strike.

Vernon
Hey Vernon, I don't understand what you mean by post one picture 9. I only see 3 pictures
 

Vernon

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Correct, the one that the minute hand mounts to. If like mine, there are two flats that the minute hand will index onto so you will need to trial/error with the position until you get the strike at the top of the hour.
Vernon
 

leeinv66

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I just had a look at one I have here and no, it doesn't have the three prong tension washer either. Someone must have added that for some reason. The minute hand is on a brass bush, so you should be able to hold the brass bush and rotate it a little inside the hole in the hand. As Willy said the lack of hand clutch action is a separate issue. That intermediate wheel should be a friction fit to the shaft it fits to. If it is not, that may be the reason someone added the tension washer.
 

James Lucas

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Aug 25, 2020
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The 'drop off point' is adjusted by moving the hand on its hub, as already stated by Peter in post #3. The lack of hand clutch action is a separate issue. I suspect this clock has been 'monkeyed with'. :)

Where did that 'three leg washer' shown hanging on the winding arbor (in photo #5) come from??

Willie X
Willie, the three leg washer came with the clock when I pick it up from a friend of mine.. You're right about the lack of hand clutch action.. It's all new to me. As you know I'm just a beginner and this looked like an easy project. Go figure....
 

James Lucas

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Aug 25, 2020
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The 'drop off point' is adjusted by moving the hand on its hub, as already stated by Peter in post #3. The lack of hand clutch action is a separate issue. I suspect this clock has been 'monkeyed with'. :)

Where did that 'three leg washer' shown hanging on the winding arbor (in photo #5) come from??

Willie X
Willie, Here's the video link
 

James Lucas

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Aug 25, 2020
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Correct, the one that the minute hand mounts to. If like mine, there are two flats that the minute hand will index onto so you will need to trial/error with the position until you get the strike at the top of the hour.
Vernon
Vernon, Here's the video link and as you can see the center shaft in just spinning and not driving the minute hand.
 

Vernon

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James, it looks to be that the 3 legged tension is causing an issue and I would remove it as none of the teeth are lining up. The wheel in front of it should then slide closer to the plate then a clip will attach to the arbor into a groove like in the last picture in post 10.
Vernon
 

James Lucas

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Aug 25, 2020
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James, it looks to be that the 3 legged tension is causing an issue and I would remove it as none of the teeth are lining up. The wheel in front of it should then slide closer to the plate then a clip will attach to the arbor into a groove like in the last picture in post 10.
Vernon
Thanks Vernon, I see now where there is suppose to be a clip which I don't have. I may be out of luck with this one.
James
 

Vernon

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Split tension washer (e-clip)
 

James Lucas

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Aug 25, 2020
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Split tension washer (e-clip)
Thanks Vernon, I see now where there is suppose to be a clip which I don't have. I may be out of luck with this one.
James
[/QUOTE
It's occurred to me that I'm not on the same page as you. For some reason I didn't receive all the photos. Where does the e-clip go. When I install the hour wheel down to the second stop, the strike lever doesn't engage because it slides under the cam. When the hour wheel in all the way down the strike lever does engage but the hour wheel just spins as seen in the video.
 

Vernon

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I don't have the clock in hand anymore but here is a photo that shows how tight the main wheel is to the plate. Make sure that on the center arbor, the cam for the strike is aligned so that it will function. E clip goes on the main wheel arbor
Vernon

IMG_20181021_131207.jpg
 

James Lucas

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Aug 25, 2020
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Finally got back to this. Thank you all for your input and Vernon, you were right about the e-clip. That was the Something Missing. Now I need some help with the strike. As I mentioned before, the strike is about ten minutes before the hour. Picture #1 shows the position of the hand when the strike happens. #2 shows the cam and the lever. #3 shows the position of the hand at the top of the hour and #4 is the cam and lever well past the strike point. Question:???: how is the adjustment made:???: By the way, that three prong tension washer is definitely not needed. Thanks again for all the help

James

#1.jpg #2.jpg #3.jpg #4.jpg
 

Vernon

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Reposition that part shown in (edit) picture 9 of post one to correct the strike.
Which means that you will un-mesh the pinion and turn it one way or the other then re-mesh the with the mating gear. This is how I recall.
Vernon
 

James Lucas

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Aug 25, 2020
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Which means that you will un-mesh the pinion and turn it one way or the other then re-mesh the with the mating gear. This is how I recall.
Vernon
Vernon, The cam is attached to the pinion-- picture #6-- and aliened with the flats of the arbor for the minute hand-- picture #5. No matter where I mesh the pinion with the mating gear the result is the same. I must be missing something, again...

James

#6.jpg #5.jpg
 

Vernon

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Of course, I understand now. The cam looks to be mounted on a brass sleeve, see if it can be rotated to adjust for the hour.
Vernon
 

James Lucas

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Aug 25, 2020
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New problem.. Clock gains 30 minutes a day. The suspension spring is 19mm length, 5mm wide, 14.5mm pin to hole, 0.04 mm thick.. Leader is 4 3/8" long and the pendulum is 17" long with an arc of 3 inches. From what I've read, the overall length of the leader and pendulum is correct. I'm guessing it's the suspension spring.
James

IMG_1306.jpg IMG_1307.jpg IMG_1308.jpg IMG_1309.jpg IMG_1310.jpg
 
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shutterbug

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Thin your suspension spring to .03 or less and see if that helps. Overall pendulum length and the resistance at the suspension spring are the more likely areas for you to concentrate on. I assume your pendulum is adjusted as low as it will go?
 

James Lucas

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Aug 25, 2020
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Thin your suspension spring to .03 or less and see if that helps. Overall pendulum length and the resistance at the suspension spring are the more likely areas for you to concentrate on. I assume your pendulum is adjusted as low as it will go?
Thanks for reply shutterbug. Where can I get a spring .03 or .02? I've check with Merritt's and Timesavers and the smallest they have is .04mm...
James
 

shutterbug

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You can thin the one you have. Get some course emery paper and work it between the paper and your pinched fingers. It's better (but not critical) to use flat surfaces instead of fingers for consistent pressure. Thin it in 30 second sessions, and measure. You may not get the speed reduction you need that way, but it will allow the pendulum to swing a longer arc which will slow the clock. Be careful not to bend the spring ;) You might be able to use a Dremel grinding disk too.
 

James Lucas

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Aug 25, 2020
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You can thin the one you have. Get some course emery paper and work it between the paper and your pinched fingers. It's better (but not critical) to use flat surfaces instead of fingers for consistent pressure. Thin it in 30 second sessions, and measure. You may not get the speed reduction you need that way, but it will allow the pendulum to swing a longer arc which will slow the clock. Be careful not to bend the spring ;) You might be able to use a Dremel grinding disk too.
Okay..I'll give it a go and get back to you..Thanks
 

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