Some Jerome clocks for viewing

Discussion in 'General Clock Discussions' started by Jerome collector, Mar 8, 2008.

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  1. steamer471

    steamer471 Registered User
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    Well I acquired my first Jerome. Actually a Jerome's' and Darrow. The hands seem to be the same size. Was this common? Writing on the back door with the year 1858 clearly written. Having done some of the reading hear on Jerome I know this clock was made way before then. Any help welcomed.

    20180308_175943.jpg 20180308_175958.jpg 20180312_131513.jpg 20180312_131522.jpg
     
  2. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Love the stenciling and the mirror surround.

    RM
     
  3. steamer471

    steamer471 Registered User
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    Thank you. Afraid the works are in dire need though. It'll be awhile before it's running again.
     
  4. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    The most recent issue of the NAWCC Watch & Clock Bulletin (May/June 2018) contains an excellent and informative article by Mike Bailey on "The U.S. Clock & Brass Co." In addition to discussing what little is known of the company itself, which was in business ca. 1866-68, Mike also discusses the role played by Chauncey Jerome in it's early operations. This was to be Jerome's last venture in the clock-making business. I can whole-heartedly recommend the article. It is on pages 244-251. Well done, Mike!:clap:
     
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  5. Jerome collector

    Jerome collector Registered User
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    Steven,
    Thanks for the kind words. There's still more to be learned about the US Clock & Brass Co., but I'm afraid it's going to take some deep diving in archives in the Chicago area. I wish I had the time and money to do things like that! Retirement can't come too soon for me. On a totally unrelated topic (I blame RM for promoting bad habits!), see below for my latest (aside from the Bulletin article) tribute to Chauncey Jerome: my recently completed "Chauncey Jerome" pineapple ukulele. You can read more about it on my website: Mike's Ukulele Build Journey - A Chauncey Jerome Clock Collector.
    Mike

    IMG_5518a.JPG IMG_5451a.JPG
     
  6. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Aloha and congratulations.

    I am eager to read the article.

    My print copy of the Bulletin is some place in the aether. So, I thought I would check out the electronic version on the NAWCC website. Alas, it is still has the last Bulletin and it has not been updated, which I hope it is soon.

    RM
     
  7. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    In the same boat here, no Bulletin and the most recent version on the web site is the last one, not the next.....
     
  8. PatH

    PatH Registered User
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    The latest versions usually post on the 1st, so hopefully we won't have to wait too much longer to either receive by mail or view online. Looking forward to Mike's article!
     
  9. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Here's the link to the aforementioned article:

    http://docs.nawcc.org/Bulletins/2010/articles/2018/433/433_244_251.pdf

    RM
     
  10. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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  11. Jerome collector

    Jerome collector Registered User
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    After a long hiatus (blamed on my second obsession: building ukuleles), I'm finally getting back into the swing up updating my website and contributing to the message board. Today's posts are devoted to a couple of Jerome & Co. (S.B. Jerome) clocks. The first of these has been previously reported on the message board by others, and the clock is now in my hands. I've tried various search terms and can't seem to locate the previous posts. Perhaps someone more clever or diligent than I will be able to track them down. An example of the second clock has been reported on by RM, and I wasn't able to track that one down either.

    This is an unusual clock with perhaps more questions than answers. As far as what it is, it’s a quarter-striking, 8-day clock, apparently by S.B. Jerome and dating to around 1870. It is the only quarter-striking clock I’ve ever seen by S.B. Jerome, which is what leads to the questions, the first of which has to do with the originality of the quarter-striking mechanism. At this point, all I can conclude is that there are no obvious signs that the clock has been altered. Another question is with respect to the originality of the triangular wood elements on the sash below the octagonal-shaped surround for the dial. These spaces were typically occupied by round medallions made of a composite material, sometimes (incorrectly) referred to as gutta percha. There is also a question about the seconds bit (hole visible just below the Roman numeral I on the dial). The position is odd, and there are no markings for the seconds bit. Clearly, markings would not fit well, considering the position of the seconds bit relative to the chapter ring. The tricky thing about the unusual features associated with this clock is that they could easily have been added at a later date.

    The clock has a typical Jerome & Co. label (this being S.B. Jerome’s company, not the trade name used by the New Haven Clock Co.). The Oct. 18th, 1870 patent referred to in the label is for the design of the sash (door). It has an 8-day, spring-driven Noah Pomeroy movement. Jerome & Co. clocks typically have Pomeroy movements. The movement has a subsidiary gear added to drive a seconds bit (which was not with the clock when purchased). The shaft for the seconds bit can be seen at roughly 4 o’clock relative to the escape wheel.

    Now for the oddity of the quarter-striking mechanism. In essentially all details, this is simply the strike side of a standard Pomeroy movement. However, the slots on the count wheel have been cut for a simplified quarter-strike, as opposed to slots spaced for counting the hours. Notice that there are unoccupied holes in the front plate that correspond to the motion works in a standard Pomeroy movement. In the rear view of the quarter-striking mechanism, you can see the hinged brass wires that connect to the main movement and that activate the quarter-strike.

    As noted by others on the message board, S.B. Jerome shelf clocks are often recognized by their use of wallpaper to cover the backboard. Some wall clocks also have the back of the clock covered with wallpaper. All examples I’ve seen, with this being the only exception, have geometric-type patterns on the wallpaper. This one has a faux-wood-grained, textured pattern. More than anything else, it is the use of this wallpaper that signifies to me that this clock was “special” when it came out of the factory. The other unusual aspects of the clock (the triangular elements on the sash, the seconds bit, and the quarter-striking mechanism) are consistent with it being “special”. None of the above eliminates the possibility (some may argue probability) that these were after-market alterations.

    As a nod to RM (and his penchant for adding images unrelated to horology) and to my obsession with ukuleles, I've included a photo of my most recent project. You'll find more images and sound files on my website. I'm not responsible for your medical bills if the sound files hurt your ears. And, just to be clear, any deficiencies are the fault of the player, not the instrument.

    Mike
    180730-2-1a.JPG 180730-2-2.JPG 180730-2-3.JPG 180730-2-5.JPG 180730-2-6.JPG 180730-2-9.JPG IMG_5622-1.JPG
     
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  12. bruce linde

    bruce linde Technical Admin
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    nice sound and intonation... well done.
     
  13. Jerome collector

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    This Jerome & Co. clock made by S.B. Jerome likely dates to the 1870s. Many of S.B. Jerome’s shelf clocks feature use of a molded composite material (often incorrectly referred to as gutta percha) as medallions added to the case or as inserts in door panels. The composite material is described in more detail in design patent #4278 for a clock-case front (invented by S.B. Jerome and assigned to Samuel Peck & Co.). Interestingly enough, at the time of the patent, Jerome and Peck shared the same business address at 81 Day Street in New Haven. Peck was a daguerreotype maker who also marketed clocks identical to those of S.B. Jerome. It is not clear to me whether the patent is claiming credit for inventing the composite material or simply for the design of the clock front, which happens to incorporate composite panels. I believe it is the latter, but the patent also describes how the panels are made. If the invention of the composite panels is also an integral element of the patent, then this clock may date to earlier than the August 9, 1870 patent date, because the patent is not acknowledged on the label. As can be seen from the photo below, this clock takes the use of the composite material to an extreme, with a large gilt panel occupying nearly the full front of the clock. The composite material itself is typically colored: a deep red and a black are the most common. Less commonly the composite has been covered with a gold-colored surface, as in this example.

    Many Jerome & Co. shelf clocks feature a label made of either wood, cardboard, or plain paper glued to a wood panel often set into the door frame. This clock features a rich blue paper label with gilt lettering. The directions found on all label types are essentially the same. Some, however, also contain instructions for an alarm and/or a notice that the clock has an element that has been patented.

    The clock has a typical Noah Pomeroy 30-hr, spring-driven movement. Pomeroy was the primary supplier of movements to S.B. Jerome. Another feature that is characteristic of S.B. Jerome shelf clocks is the use of wallpaper covering the backboard.

    Mike
    180720-1-1a.JPG 180720-1-2.JPG 180720-1-3.JPG 180720-1-5.JPG Design patent 4278-1a.jpg Design patent 4278-2a.jpg
     
  14. Jerome collector

    Jerome collector Registered User
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    Thanks. Finally, someone who appreciates true craftsmanship!
     
  15. PatH

    PatH Registered User
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    What an interesting clock. It appears that Peck held several patents related to daguerreotype cases. Have you found other Jerome clocks that incorporated either gutta percha and/or the metallic component as was used as inserts in the daguerreotype cases?
     
  16. Jerome collector

    Jerome collector Registered User
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    Pat,

    Interesting question regarding the metallic component used on daguerreotype cases. I've never seen metallic components used as part of the decorative insert on an SB Jerome clock. However, the colored (red or black) inserts always (I think) have a gilt rim that mimics the brass (?) components on daguerreotypes. There are multiple threads on the message board with examples of other uses of the composite inserts and add-ons (medallions, door knobs), including those started by oxblood2, Steven Thornberry, and iowaclock. And then there's the elusive one with wonderful examples posted by RM that I can't seem to locate. Perhaps RM will weigh in on the similarities to daguerreotypes, as he's quite knowledgable on them.
     
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  17. Jeremy Woodoff

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    There is an August 7, 2010 post from me on this thread that shows a C. Jerome clock that has an entire case front made of what appears to be this same composite material. At first I thought it might be hard rubber, but, I don't think so. However, based on the signatures on the movement and dial, the clock appears to be considerably older than the series of S.B. Jerome/Peck clocks referenced in Jerome Collector's post.
     
  18. Jeremy Woodoff

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    The fact that it has both a quarter-strike and a seconds bit addition leads me to wonder if the clock was specially made for some kind of industrial or commercial timing function.
     
  19. PatH

    PatH Registered User
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    Here's a link to one of the threads that includes many additional links re this type of clock case
    Jerome & Co. Gutta Percha
     
  20. Jerome collector

    Jerome collector Registered User
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    Jeremy,

    Thanks for tying this back to your August 2010 post (#44 in this thread). I wasn't able to locate your clock in Jerome's 1852 and 1853 catalogs, but I suspect the clock is from that period. As you note, this pre-dates the S.B. Jerome clock by nearly 20 years. Whether it's the same type of composite material, I can't say. Your clock appears to have a Pomeroy 8-day movement.

    Just to clear up some mis-statements I've seen more than once in earlier posts about the patent (#4278) that discusses the composite material, it is not a Peck invention. The "inventor" was Samuel B. Jerome, who then assigned it to Samuel Peck & Co.

    Mike
     
  21. Jerome collector

    Jerome collector Registered User
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    Now to a bit of a mystery (don't you just love 'em?) regarding the movement in my quarter-striking clock. It took Jeremy's post for me to go back and review examples of Pomeroy's movements, as well as the research by A. Lee Smith on escape wheel bridges. I was attempting to confirm that Jeremy's clock has a Pomeroy movement, and I believe it does. But, then I looked at my clock, and was smacked upside the head with a 2x4! Note the escape wheel bridge: that is not a known Pomeroy bridge. However, all other aspects of the movement (plate cutouts, wheel shapes, train layouts, plate screws, bushings, verge retention spring, etc.), except for the escape wheel bridge and a couple of other details, are identical to Pomeroy's movements. What are those other details? The rake of the teeth on the escape wheel is opposite to the ones on Pomeroy movements that I've seen (see below for a standard Pomeroy on the left and the one from my quarter-striker on the right). The verge arm rivet is also slightly different. Any thoughts from the panel on this mystery? Am I correct in attributing this movement to Pomeroy, or do I need to dive deeper to identify the maker?
    130806-1-3.jpg 180730-2-3.JPG
     
  22. Jeremy Woodoff

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    Was it necessary to alter the escape wheel and verge in order for the seconds bit to operate? Is the direction of rotation of the escape wheel reversed?

    Do you have the reference for the original patent for the material (not the clock case front)?
     
  23. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    #273 Steven Thornberry, Jan 1, 2019
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2020
    One thing I've learned in my brief and intermittent studies of Noah Pomeroy movements is to expect the unexpected. Your quarter striker seems to have the Pomeroy deadbeat escapement for which he received a patent dated July 13, 1869.
    Dead-beat Verge Patent.pdf

    This patent is briefly discussed in a Bulletin article of June 2010 (the RAN column), pp. 346-349.
    http://docs.nawcc.org/Bulletins/2010/articles/2010/386/386_339.pdf

    Note the shape of the neck of the EW bridge in figure 13A. Similar to yours, though it appears to have been damaged in what I presume to have been a somewhat bodgered attempt to replace the original deadbeat verge.

    Pomeroy's EW bridges leave me scratching my head and wondering whether there is a chronological sequence, but I am not sure. Note the following, on a signed movement, not quite like either of the two you show (different rivet position on the foot).
    Round Top Movement 1.JPG
    Not unlike this unsigned (and presumed Pomeroy) movement in an Ansonia Brass and Copper Gothic Gem, but again the foot appears slightly different.
    upload_2019-1-1_18-14-6.png

    I won't get started on 30-hour Pomeroy movements, but I draw your attention to the probably Pomeroy movement in fig. 11B on page 586 of the October 2010 Bulletin (again, of course, the RAN column). Note the neck of the EW bridge. The whole article is an interesting read.
    http://docs.nawcc.org/Bulletins/2010/articles/2010/388/388_579.pdf

    That should be compared to the EW bridge on my 30-hour Pomeroy movement in an Ingraham Venetian.
    Venetian Movement.JPG Venetian EW Bridge.JPG
     

    Attached Files:

  24. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Welcome back to the MB.

    You were missed.

    Glad you posted the 2 very interesting clocks you acquired this past summer.

    RE: the 1/4 striking clock.

    I propose that SBJ was looking for new uses for his basic units. Just adding essentially a "bolt on" to an already existing clock would be a cost effective way to go

    That's sorta what he did here:

    Samuel Estell's "Programme Clock"

    See my posts on that thread by scrolling down. Created the least inexpensive version of the Estell's Programme Clock.

    I propose your 1/4 striking clock was a prototype, almost in the same vein but not quite as flexible nor "programmable" so it never went into production?

    It's wonderful and probably unique.

    RE: Peck and daguerreotype cases. See this reference:

    http://docs.nawcc.org/Bulletins/1990/articles/1998/315/315_482.pdf

    Scroll down to page 485.

    I suspect the Jerome "foil fronts" were also Peck products as the "foil" part is so similar to the innards of a daguerreotype case. For an example of one of these and a discussion, see posting # 57 on this thread. Here's a teaser pic:

    img_2601-jpg.jpg

    And yes, something somewhat superfluous:

    57707072_1_x.jpg
    The painting is called the "Ukulele Player" by Alex Katz. It recently sold at auction for $147,600. I guess you're not the only one who values ukulele playing?

    RM
     
  25. PatH

    PatH Registered User
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    Is this the patent for the material?
     

    Attached Files:

  26. Jerome collector

    Jerome collector Registered User
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    Thanks to everyone for doing the leg work for me. I need time to digest everything, but my preliminary thoughts, in no particular order:
    1) I stand corrected on the patent issue. Thanks to Pat for providing the Peck patent of 1854 for the composite material. Interesting that it pre-dates Chauncey Jerome's 1856 bankruptcy, which may suggest that Jeremy's Chauncey Jerome composite-cased shelf clock is, in fact, derived from the Peck patent.
    2) Thanks to RM for pulling together numerous threads and thoughts on SB Jerome, Chauncey Jerome, and Samuel Peck. Now, can you tell me what ukulele the fellow in the Katz painting is playing?
    3) Thanks to Steven for uncovering that interesting article on Pomeroy's patented dead-beat escapement. Perhaps mystery solved? And, perhaps, another element of the quarter-striking clock that marks it as special?

    In future, I'm going to just compose short posts and ask a few questions. In short order all of my questions will be answered, without me having to lift a finger!!

    Mike
     
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  27. Jeremy Woodoff

    Jeremy Woodoff Registered User
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    Thanks for the patent link. In reading it, I believe it refers specifically to the use of gilded paper pressed into the shellac-based composition, rather than the composition material itself. Perhaps that is subject to an earlier patent, or was not a patented substance at all. In any event, that particular material was known by the time my C. Jerome clock case was produced.
     
  28. PatH

    PatH Registered User
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    Hmmm....I thought rows 15-30 were the composition material, followed by a description of how the raised design was made and the layer of paper or gilding was applied to that base material. Overall, it's an interesting concept, and from what I read on other sites, Peck called this material Union (union of shellac and the fiber). From this came the name union cases that is applied rather generically to daguerreotype cases. Regardless, this has been a very enlightening thread!
     
  29. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    A "Bailey-Ukulele"?

    RM
     
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  30. Jeremy Woodoff

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    It is a bit confusing, since so much of the description involves the composition material, but I think the phrase in red is the key. In other words, his invention of the gold-on-paper decoration is applicable to use on the composition material:

    "The composition of which the main body of the case is made, and to which my invention is applicable, is composed of gun
    shellac and woody fibers or other suitable fibrous material dyed to the color that may be required and ground with the shellac and
    between hot rollers so as to be converted into a mass which when heated becomes plastic so that it can be pressed into a mold
    or between dies and made to take the form that may be imparted to it by such dies."
     
  31. Jerome collector

    Jerome collector Registered User
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    Reading patents can be frustrating, but, after reading this one over again, I agree with Jeremy that the composite material is not the subject of the patent. At the tail end of most (all?) patents, the inventor concisely restates what his/her invention consists of (the "I claim" part). In this case, Peck is limiting his claim to: 1) "The Improvement of ornamenting the surfaces of the impression of the die with burnished gold..." and 2) "...the extension of the paper up the inner surfaces of the sides of the case..." To the extent that I understand the patent, it appears as though the Jerome "foil front" shown in RM's post above may be an example of its application.

    The fact that the making of the composite material is not the subject of the patent makes me wonder if the process was ever patented or if the patent had expired by 1854.
     
  32. Jerome collector

    Jerome collector Registered User
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    Following up with additional thoughts and observations:

    1) Steven Thornberry gets the "Sherlock Holmes" award. The movement does, in fact, have a deadbeat escapement. Answering a question from Jeremy, the direction of rotation of the escape wheel is the same as in the "standard" Pomeroy movement with recoil escapement.
    2) I appreciate the inclusion of the link by RM to the RAN discussion of SB Jerome's patent, but I disagree with Don Weber's and Snowden Taylor's conclusion that the patent is for the formula for creation of the composite material. Referring to the inventor's claim, Jerome is only laying claim to "The design for the clock-front". While the design incorporates the composite panels, I do not believe it is true that the claim extends to the material itself.
    3) While I'd love to think that this clock is a prototype, I hesitate to think I have a "one only". It would answer many of the questions if another example would surface. Part of the acquisition story that I neglected to mention was that I purchased the clock at National this year. Our visit was rather rushed, and I didn't have time to research the find before purchasing it. I knew that I had seen a similar clock on eBay a couple of years ago (incorrectly identified as an alarm clock) and also discussed previously on the message board, and my hope was that this was a second example. As it turns out, it was the same clock, although with some additions (mainspring replaced; gong replaced). In private discussions with RM, one idea floated was that this was an "end-of-day" product, created by one of Jerome's workers in his spare time. Intriguing idea, but I'd still like to find another example to show that it's more than a "one-off".
    4) RM, you would have to introduce the Estell Programme clock into this discussion, wouldn't you? I would dearly love to acquire an SB Jerome (or even a US Clock & Brass Co.) clock with Estell's patent mechanism. Rereading your contribution to the Estell thread, I noticed that you said you were happy to share your clock. I'd be more than willing to provide you my address, so that you could share the clock with me.
     
  33. PatH

    PatH Registered User
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    Not to belabor the point, but if you google Samuel Peck daguerreotype, it seems that invention of the composition material and the name "union" related to the material is widely attributed to Peck. Of course, we all know how information, as well as misinformation, can be propagated. ;)
     
  34. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Just to throw this in.

    There is a great book, "American Daguerreian Art" by Floyd and Marion Rinhart. It is devoted mainly to the images themselves. I believe this couple also wrote one about just the cases, too.

    There is an entire chapter "Miniature Cases for Daguerreian Art". A fascinating story in and of itself. These cases connect to the long tradition of keeping portrait miniatures in cases for protection. On page 90, Samuel Peck is discussed. It is reported that he developed a "radically new and different" case, the "Union Case". It states that he received a patent for them on 10/3/1854. It is related therein that:

    In the patent, he describes materials used and tells of holding gilded paper directly against the surface of the die, compressing it upon the plastic composition.

    So, this statement is consistent with the patent posted above and nothing new here. I believe that the patent covers the process, materials and the use of gilt paper, but not just the last one alone. Creating panels is consistent with what is found in the clocks.

    Getting back to the info in this link:

    http://docs.nawcc.org/Bulletins/1990/articles/1998/315/315_482.pdf

    I read it as an 1870 patent on the design of a new clock front employing panels created using the basic process by Peck.

    Commented upon in the above cited book is the quality of the relief images on these cases. In my opinion, that can be said of the plastic and foil panels of the clocks under discussion. The dies were made by skillful engravers who were diesinkers.

    Other people would start marking plastic cases, too. Much more info in the book.

    Some other considerations and I apologize, a bit off topic.

    Interestingly, earlier types of dag cases were made by Peck and other CT makers who were major suppliers to the booming Daguerreian trade. One type of case was made from MOP inlaid painted papier mache. A material used for clock cases. Now, Litchfield Mfg made papier mache clock cases.

    82897-jpg.jpg

    Could some of the papier mache dag case makers, like Peck, have made them too providing another connection to dag case and clock makers?

    Any info about the foil fronts like the one shown above? Or the Jerome Botsford clocks with pressed foil fronts under a dome. I suspect they're products of Peck or another dag case maker. Was there a patent covering these?

    Enough rambling.

    RM
     
  35. Jerome collector

    Jerome collector Registered User
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    Interpreting patents should probably be best left to patent attorneys. The story surrounding Eli Terry's 1816 patent and lawsuit against Seth Thomas illustrates the difficulty of determining aspects of patents that are true inventions and enforceable as such. It would be great if there were a patent attorney who is a contributor to the message board who could weigh in on this topic.
     
  36. Jerome collector

    Jerome collector Registered User
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    Can you stand for me to stand corrected one more time? Peck's 1854 patent has a claim (perhaps the primary claim of his patent) that I somehow missed in two readings. On lines 3-6 of page 2, Peck states "...what I do claim is the improvement in the manufacture of picture cases or articles from a composition of shellac and fibrous material as described above..." So, the manufacture of the composite material is an integral element of his patent, as other above have argued. The claims associated with ornamenting with burnished gold and extension of the paper up the sides of the case that I noted in post #281 were actually additional claims in his patent.
     
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  37. Jeremy Woodoff

    Jeremy Woodoff Registered User
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    Not to be argumentative or anything, but I think those lines 3-6 illustrate the same thing I described above: The "Improvement" that is the subject of the patent is to cases manufactured from "Composition." A book on daguerreotype cases dates their introduction to 1852, two years prior to the above-referenced patent. Another book called "The Daguerreotype in America" by Beaumont Newhall, available in part on Google, states after quoting from the Peck patent above that "Peck made no claim to the invention of the composition, or to its use to form daguerreotype cases." But then Wikipedia dates the introduction of union cases to 1856, two years after the 1854 patent, so who knows how accurate any of this information is.
     
  38. Jerome collector

    Jerome collector Registered User
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    On first glance, I thought this clock was a smaller version of S.B. Jerome’s design patent (959, 20 Oct 1857) for a clock case that I have seen referred to as the “Square Rose”. [Incidentally, if anyone knows the origin of the name “Square Rose” I would love to hear it.] Comparison to the patent drawing quickly eliminates that assumption. Nonetheless, there are similarities between the clock and the patent case that lead me to believe that it was inspired by the patent. The clearest similarities can be found in the cornice. To the best of my knowledge, S.B. Jerome never manufactured a clock following the 1857 patent specifications, which is the reason I was so interested in this clock. The only examples I have seen (in 30-hr and 8-day weight-driven versions) were made by the Waterbury Clock Co. at around the time Chauncey Jerome worked for Waterbury (fall of 1856 to spring of 1857), prior to the issuance of the patent.

    S.B. Jerome’s clock-making activities aren’t clear in the years immediately following the 1856 bankruptcy of the Jerome Manufacturing Co., of which he was the Secretary. Most clocks having features patented by S.B. Jerome appear to be from around 1863 and extending into the 1870s. Jerome was issued five design patents during this period (1763, 16 Jun 1863; 2057, 9 May 1865; 4278, 9 Aug 1870; and 4338, 6 Sep 1870). The New Haven City Directory lists him as a clock maker from 1863 to 1878, after which (1879-1882) he is associated with “Jerome & Co.”. From relatively scarce labels on detached lever marine timepieces, S.B. Jerome was operating a business for a period under the name “S.B. Jerome & Co.”. All other clocks bearing his patent features appear with labels for either Jerome & Co. (note the absence of “S.B.”) or S. Peck & Co (a daguerreotype manufacturer). In the 1869, 1870, and 1871 New Haven Directories Jerome’s business address, 81 Day St., is the same as Peck’s.

    The label, indicating the clock is the product of Jerome & Co., is glued to the back of the case. Labels on clocks having S.B. Jerome patent features are usually of three varieties: wood panels on the inside of the door (serving to retain and protect a decorative glass or composite panel), cardboard labels also on the inside of the door; or paper labels (either attached to the back of the case or glued to a wood panel mounted on the inside of the door). Most shelf clocks tend to have labels on the inside of the door. Others, like octagon timepieces and small shelf timepieces with lever escapement movements, have paper labels glued to the back of the case.

    As is typical of shelf clocks having elements based on S.B. Jerome’s patents, the movement was made by Noah Pomeroy. In this case, the movement is an 8-day version with external alarm and is stamped “N. POMEROY/BRISTOL CT”. Pomeroy’s movements had either pinned plates (believed to be earlier) or plates held together with screws. Although my memory may be faulty, I believe only the pinned plate movements had a Pomeroy maker’s stamp (and not all of those had a stamp). Based on the association of screwed plate movements with labels listing Jerome’s October 1870 patent, I suspect this clock dates to the mid- to late-1860s.

    Another feature common to clocks attributed to S.B. Jerome is the use of decorative paper glued to the backboard inside the clock, or, in the case of marine timepieces, glued to the back of the case. Multiple patterns (at least five) have been observed on these paper backings.

    An unusual and unexplained feature of this clock is the presence of two pieces of wood attached to the backboard on which the movement and gong base are mounted. The wood pieces are attached with the same style of wire nail used to attach the backboard to the case, and the pieces are also glued to the backboard with hide glue. Previously on the message board (post #186 on this thread), I reported on another S.B. Jerome clock with a similar feature. In the case of the latter, the decorative paper was crudely draped over the added wood piece. In the case of the clock in this posting, the wood pieces were added after the paper was glued to the backboard. From the back (outside) of the clock, there’s no evidence of mounting screws ever penetrating the backboard. The only screw that does penetrate through the backboard is the one holding the alarm bell. Were the wood pieces added at a later date, after the mounting screws lost purchase in the backboard, or are these an original feature of the clock? And, if added later, why would it have been necessary to add one for the gong base? Unlike movement mounting blocks, which were removed repeatedly to service the movement (leading to deterioration of the backboard), there would have been no reason to remove the gong and no reason to expect a problem holding the gong base to the backboard.

    Another atypical feature of this clock is the door latch. Most S.B. Jerome shelf clocks I’ve seen have either a latch engaged by a door knob or a hook mounted on the side of the case. The latch on this clock is a strip of brass under tension that engages a small pin inside the door frame. In addition, it has a knob made of a composite material screwed to the door. The design elements of the knob are identical to the knob on another of my S.B. Jerome clocks, except that the latter turns a latch.

    The hands do not match, and I don’t know which (if any) is original to the clock. Aside from the uncertainty about the hands and the wood pieces attached to the backboard, I believe everything else is original.

    Mike
    Design_patent_959.jpg 191130-1-1.JPG 191130-1-2.JPG 191130-1-3.JPG 191130-1-4.JPG 191130-1-5.JPG 191130-1-6.JPG 191130-1-7.JPG
     
  39. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    Excellent write-up, Mike, and a very nice clock. I particularly like your analysis of the dates of pinned movements vs. movements held together by screws. It certainly matches any information I have. Interesting that SBJ seemed to make several different clocks with a similar, box-like style, perhaps loosely modeled on his 1857 patent. I have wondered whether the use of Jerome & Co., rather than S.B. Jerome & Co., was an attempt to capitalize on the perhaps better known New Haven Jerome & Co. That tan label is one that SBJ must have used for years. I have one on a small timepiece on which an the patent date of August 9, 1870, had been incorrectly stamped. That patent had nothing to do with the timepiece in question and was blotted out, but not quite enough.

    TP 2 Label 2.JPG TP 2 Label Patent Date.JPG
     
  40. Jerome collector

    Jerome collector Registered User
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    Steven,

    Thanks for your comments. And thanks for posting images of your label with the blotted out patent date. Anomalies like that are fascinating.

    I continue to be puzzled by the apparently multiple companies using the name "Jerome & Co." and in business at the same time. I know that Snowden Taylor and others have tried over the years in multiple Bulletin articles to sort out the many Jerome & Companies, but those haven't answered all questions. Perhaps I need to sit down with all of those articles and read them straight through.

    Starting in 1855 (when the Jerome Manufacturing Co. was still in business), SBJ was a partner in the UK sales firm that went by "Jerome & Co.", but it seems doubtful that he was selling clocks through that outlet. I've been contacted by many people in the UK with questions about their Jerome & Co. clocks, and none match these SBJ clocks; all are typical products (mostly ogees or cottage clocks) of the New Haven Clock Co. Is it possible that New Haven used "Jerome & Co." only on clocks marketed overseas? That too seems doubtful, given the number of clocks with these labels that show up in the US market (I believe Chris Bailey pointed this out). Is it possible that these clocks with SBJ patent features were actually made by the New Haven Clock Co., presumably under license from SBJ, and sold under the trade name "Jerome & Co."? It wasn't until 1882 that New Haven filed papers to incorporate (in the US) the company "Jerome and Company", so the basis for their use of the name in the US prior to that is unclear. The final two inventions patented by SBJ, one in 1880 and the other in 1881, were assigned to Jerome & Co. Was he assigning the patents to his own company or to the company that incorporated in 1882? Some companies existed as a business prior to incorporation. New Haven is actually one such company: it formed in 1851 but was not incorporated until two years later. And, if he was assigning the patents to the company of which he was the principal partner, what would have been the reason for that? I find it more than a little coincidental that SBJ left New Haven in 1883 and moved to New York City. Was his move somehow connected to New Haven's incorporation of Jerome and Company?

    If the Jerome & Co. clocks (not S.B. Jerome & Co.-labeled clocks) with SBJ patent features were made by SBJ and sold in the US, and the New Haven Clock Co. was also selling clocks in the US at the same time using the trade name "Jerome & Co.", how is it possible that SBJ and New Haven were not involved in a massive lawsuit? There would have been huge confusion in the market over whose product a clock with a Jerome & Co. label was. Or was there a lawsuit, and we simply haven't uncovered the evidence of it?

    Mike
     
  41. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    Again, an excellent analysis, Mike. Thanks! My suggestion did raise in the back of my mind the possibility of a lawsuit, though I did not mention it. I am glad to see that you had the same thought. Thanks, again!
     
  42. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Came across a Jerome shelf clock that turned out to have some unusual features that after careful examination I believe is real. Thought I would see what others thought.

    The case is an 11 inches tall of ebonized pine with gilt scroll work and MOP inlay (some bits missing):

    jerome lever 1.JPG jerome lever 2.JPG jerome lever 3.JPG

    Note the decoration on the sides of the case. But also note how deep the case is.

    The front of the case above the base molding opens and has a glazed spun brass bezel. The bezel is fixed.

    Overall, most closely resembles the "mantel lever time piece" on page 17 of Jerome's 1852 trade catalog (see page 87, figure 188 of Bailey's monograph)

    The first surprise came when the door was opened:

    jerome 15.JPG

    A round signed "tin" dial mounted on a piece of black painted tin. The dial is mounted by square cut brads except for one replacement. This is better appreciated from the reverse:

    jerome lever 4.JPG jerome lever 6.JPG

    The tin looks 19th century, like what might be used for a dial or even a weight baffle in a clock. Note the holes cut out to accommodate the apertures in the dial.

    The mounting rails have no other holes and everything lines up just so:

    jerome lever 10.JPG

    The screws used to retain the dial plate are identical to those used for the hinges.

    The movement is a signed lever movement. For a nearly identical one, see this article:

    http://www.nawcc.org/images/stories/2010/articles/2013/406/406_572_593.pdf

    Go to page 575, figure 4. It most resembles the movement on the viewer's right except the balance wheel is retained by a flat head screw. Makes quite the racket.

    Getting back to the case. As mentioned, rather a deep case. Too deep. Here it is with the movement and movement blocks removed:

    jerome lever 11.JPG

    Here are the blocks:

    jerome lever 12.JPG

    Those are some big blocks made necessary by the depth of the case. Nothing spurious that I can see on the back board. Now see the unused slots...for a seat board!

    See posting 105 on this thread. Jerome made shelf clocks with deep cases for his upside down movements which mounted on a seat board. They weren't very good clocks (see the discussion in that posting). The movements were modified so they were right side up but with the signature upside down. See the cited posting.

    So Jerome wasn't adverse to "repurposing". Maybe that's what happened here? A factory made put together of available components including a deep case originally intended for an upside down seat mounted movement?

    Thoughts appreciated.

    RM
     
  43. TEACLOCKS

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  44. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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  45. Jerome collector

    Jerome collector Registered User
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    Steven,
    Thanks for pointing TEACLOCKS to my active website. I've been thinking about taking my old website down, but it appears Earthlink has already done that for me (without even asking). We still have an Earthlink account, so I'm not sure why they ditched the website. No harm, no foul, I suppose.
    Mike
     
  46. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    As Jimmy Durante might have said: It’s a conspiracy!
     
  47. Al Dodson

    Al Dodson Registered User
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    One of our chapter 158 members, Darcy Bartelman, found these newspaper articles recently and has allowed me to use them. I Don’t think they have been published before. I do not want to see them fall into obscurity again. If anyone is in regular contact with Mary Jane, would please see she is aware of them. I would love to see the document linking Noble Jerome to the Ives factory; it explains so much about the Jeromes and their path towards the OG.

    B27D9E16-5A20-4C8C-AA2E-1348BC718E26.jpeg 29E065E6-0122-4F02-9012-C17F749310B3.jpeg
     
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  48. Jerome collector

    Jerome collector Registered User
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    Al,

    Thanks for posting these newspaper clippings and to Darcy for allowing you to post them. I'll let Mary Jane know about them. One of the wonderful side benefits of the increasing interest in genealogy is that old newspapers are being scanned and made available on the internet. I suspect we're going to run across more tidbits like these in the future. These two examples add more pieces to the puzzle of the use of Jerome's name on clocks (especially ones marketed overseas) and also to his whereabouts and activities in the years before his death in 1868. I'd always wondered if Jerome was getting some form of compensation for use of his name on clocks made by New Haven, given the very close connections between Jerome and New Haven in the early-mid 1850s. In his autobiography, he certainly complained about others using his name, but he didn't specifically name anyone, and he ultimately had very favorable things to say about Hiram Camp and the New Haven Clock Co. The size of the suit ($50K) is an indication he felt he was being seriously abused by New Haven.

    I'm curious about your reference to "the document linking Noble Jerome to the Ives factory". Does this mean you know such a document exists, or merely that you wish it would come to light if it exists?

    Mike
     
  49. Rockin Ronnie

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    "These New York men would say that they were agents for Jerome and that they would have a plenty in a few days, and make a sale to these merchants of Jerome clocks. They would then go to the Printers and have a lot of labels struck off and put into their cheap clocks, and palm them off as mine. This fraud carried on for several years. I finally sued some of these blackleg parties, Samuels & Dunn and Sperry & Shaw, and found out to my satisfaction that they had used more than two hundred thousand of my labels. They had probably sent about one hundred thousand to Europe."
    Jerome autobiography


    Ron
     
  50. Jerome collector

    Jerome collector Registered User
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    Ron,

    Thanks for pointing to Jerome's autobiography for his suits against Samuels & Dunn and Sperry & Shaw. Although it wasn't clear in my posting above, I was referring to the period after Jerome went bankrupt, when multiple makers took advantage of his name. Jerome doesn't name them. The suits against Samuels & Dunn and Sperry & Shaw were from the mid-1840s, shortly after Jerome started exporting clocks to England. I don't think Jerome hesitated naming them in his autobiography, because he had filed suit against them (so it was in the public record). A while back, I posted a thread on what I believe to be a counterfeit Jerome made by Sperry & Shaw.

    Mike
     

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