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So they said would you like this....

John in Norfolk

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Sep 21, 2021
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Well, they say you shouldnt look a gift horse in the mouth but here I am anyway. I was gifted a rather nice longcase clock a week or so back. It was supposed to be a Junghans but I have a feeling it is an HAC item. It came to me as "not working". The only real problem i could find was that the pendulum ribbon had been snapped, for a second time apparently as it had been obviously repaired - poorly - some time before. The ribbon originally had a brass ferrule at one end and a square cutout at the other and should have been fastened to the leader with the usual clip. Whoever had repaired it had used a double ended ribbon and soft soldered it to the leader.

I managed to locate correct parts and fixed it properly. Lo and behold it now goes - and keeps reasonable time too.

I know next to nothing about clock histories (despite having worked at Thomas Mercer in St Albans as a lab tech many years ago), so I figured you folk may be able to help.

The case is oak (I think), in Art Deco style but bears no labels or logos to support my belief that it is maybe 1910-20's

The movement has crossed arrows logo on the back, suggesting it is HAC. It also has "4.10" stamped on the back. Could this mean April 1910?

I've taken a few photos, which are attached for your delight (other reactions are available). I've included a photo of the one baseplate retaining screw that was fitted. Its a woodscrew type thread and fits OK. The other screw was the more normal machine screw thread and is pretty definitely a wrong'un. I've not found any of the woodscrew type fastenings - does anyone know if they can be found anywhere?

Many thanks indeed for any advice and suggestions you can offer as to its likely history and provenance.

Case_Open.jpg Clock_General_1.jpg Clock_General_2.jpg Clock_General_3.jpg Escapement_General.jpg Gong.jpg Logo_Detail.jpg Movement_Back.jpg Movement_Front.jpg Plate_retaining_screw.jpg
 
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JTD

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Sep 27, 2005
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Welcome to the board,

Yes, the mark is HAC and around 1910. HAC were taken over by Junghans in 1930, so maybe that's where the Junghans idea came in. The trade name Sopra (on the gong) was used by HAC.

I would call the case 'late Art Nouveau' rather than Art Deco.

I cant see the suspension spring properly, even when magnified, but something looks wrong to me. Can you post a clearer picture?

I am not clear about the screw you show. What does it screw into? If it goes into one of the movement posts, then it ought to be a machine screw, but if for some reason it is going into wood, then that's different.

A nice clock to have given to you, congratulations.

JTD
 

John in Norfolk

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Sep 21, 2021
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Hi JTD and thanks for the historical info. In the absence of any more suggestions to the contrary, I'm going to regard the "4.10" as very likely meaning either April 1910 or Q4 1910 :) . In both cases about 10 years earlier than first thought.

Yes, the pendulum suspension had been "repaired" (in about 2015). WHoever did it had used something similar to part no. 5536 from HERE, despite not having a mounting matching the end of the leader. The end attaching to the leader had been simply soft soldered in place on top of the remains of the original spring and its clip. :emoji_astonished:.

I got lucky: the remains of the original spring were still inside the case - the large part, from the end that attached to the pillar on the back plate, down to the start of its attachment to the leader, had been recovered and taped to the wooden movement platform. The end of the spring that attached to the leader had simply been left in place, along with its clip, when the replacement had been soft soldered on top, on the end of the brass leader. The 2015 repair was definitely a bodge (and that's being generous).

I was able to piece together both halves of the original spring, matching the broken ends. I was very confident indeed that it matched the dimensions of part number S5556 from HERE and the remains of the fastening clip matched one of THESE.

Got the bits through the post the next day. It just went together; no fight, no persuasion, no bodging. Just a sigh of relief.

Here's a better shot of the leader & spring as now fitted and working.

That fastening screw went through the slide in the case and up into the wooden movement platform. It just screws into wood; there's no machine screw threaded parts on either the slide or the platform. I might have a crack at making one some time if I cant find an original.

Leader_and_Spring.jpg
 

new2clocks

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Apr 25, 2005
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Welcome to the forum.

In the absence of any more suggestions to the contrary, I'm going to regard the "4.10" as very likely meaning either April 1910 or Q4 1910 :) . In both cases about 10 years earlier than first thought.
The "4.10" is not likely a date code. HAC / HAU did not date code their clocks prior to the Junghans acquisition. However, your clock could be from 1910, but not because the impression left on the backplate is a HAC / HAU date code.

Prior to the acquisition by Junghans, HAC clocks are difficult to date as HAC left few clues. I agree with JTD's reasoning as to the vintage of your clock.

There are folks who have some HAC catalogs. They may be along to provide a catalog that includes your clock. Keep in mind, however, that a catalog only proves that a model was offered in a particular year. It most likely was offered xxx years before and xxx years after the catalog date.

Regards.
 

John in Norfolk

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Sep 21, 2021
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Thanks indeed! That's the first "proper" clock repair I've done. I found an old solid brass battery terminal I had knocking around and thought it looked a bit like the head of that odd securing screw.A bit like? It was damn near identical! Found an old woodscrew that was the right size and made up a new securing screw, so I now have a pair.
I think the only other thing I'll do is make a new striker plate for the bottom door catch. Someone had forced the door at some point and ripped off the old catch. Not a pretty sight but it's all hidden with the door shut and the graunched wood might be capable of being tidied up without too much pain.
 

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