• Important Executive Director Announcement from the NAWCC

    The NAWCC Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Mr. Rory McEvoy has been named Executive Director of the NAWCC. Rory is an internationally renowned horological scholar and comes to the NAWCC with strong credentials that solidly align with our education, fundraising, and membership growth objectives. He has a postgraduate degree in the conservation and restoration of antique clocks from West Dean College, and throughout his career, he has had the opportunity to handle some of the world’s most important horological artifacts, including longitude timekeepers by Harrison, Kendall, and Mudge.

    Rory formerly worked as Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, where his role included day-to-day management of research and digitization projects, writing, public speaking, conservation, convening conferences, exhibition work, and development of acquisition/disposal and collection care policies. In addition, he has worked as a horological specialist at Bonhams in London, where he cataloged and handled many rare timepieces and built important relationships with collectors, buyers, and sellers. Most recently, Rory has used his talents to share his love of horology at the university level by teaching horological theory, history, and the practical repair and making of clocks and watches at Birmingham City University.

    Rory is a British citizen and currently resides in the UK. Pre-COVID-19, Rory and his wife, Kaai, visited HQ in Columbia, Pennsylvania, where they met with staff, spent time in the Museum and Library & Research Center, and toured the area. Rory and Kaai will be relocating to the area as soon as the immigration challenges and travel restrictions due to COVID-19 permit.

    Some of you may already be familiar with Rory as he is also a well-known author and lecturer. His recent publications include the book Harrison Decoded: Towards a Perfect Pendulum Clock, which he edited with Jonathan Betts, and the article “George Graham and the Orrery” in the journal Nuncius.

    Until Rory’s relocation to the United States is complete, he will be working closely with an on-boarding team assembled by the NAWCC Board of Directors to introduce him to the opportunities and challenges before us and to ensure a smooth transition. Rory will be participating in strategic and financial planning immediately, which will allow him to hit the ground running when he arrives in Columbia

    You can read more about Rory McEvoy and this exciting announcement in the upcoming March/April issue of the Watch & Clock Bulletin.

    Please join the entire Board and staff in welcoming Rory to the NAWCC community.

Smart, London, mahogany double fusee 12" drop dial.

Chris Radano

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I've had this clock for about 15 years. It's been a little bit pushed to the side. But I realized I haven't posted it here yet.
To start, I think we're looking at a 1960s restoration job. Whenever this clock was restored, it's been a while given the appearance of the movement.
There are several Smarts, London, listed in Loomes that are possible candidates. But somewhere second quarter of the 19th c. seems right.
There are some crude aspects to the case and movement construction. This maker did not appear to be hell bent on quality. But the clock does have a quaint, if not massive, feel to it. Including some lovely white mold in the case.
There is a nice shaped pendulum, and bottom door lock with key.
The hands that came with the clock look like subpar replacements. They are blued steel, but the hour hand is too loose and unusable in it's current state.
The last photo shows a really nice pair of hands I had made for this clock. This second set of hands is made from relatively thick steel, but it does look like they can be made to work. The bluing is superb.
So another clock I squirreled away. :emoji_chipmunk:

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Chris Radano

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I have always fancied a clock with those hands.
I suppose you are referring to the second set? I agree. Maybe they are not correct but they are lovely.

I like the side ears. They remind me of a woman standing with her hands on her hips, glaring disapprovingly at her husband.
 

novicetimekeeper

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sorry, hadn't picked up about the hands, yes the second set. I have seen them on both brackets and dial clocks but only a couple of times on dial clocks.
 

Chris Radano

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The nicer hands are Regency style. I had these made firstly because I like them. The shaped pendulum rod can be found on Regency, or slightly later, London clocks (mostly bracket clocks but some drop dials). This clock has the correct pendulum, so finding these hands on this this clock is not outlandish. But the clock is pushing the date a bit to the late side for this style of hands. I took some liberty.

Also, I wondered why double fusee dial clocks are found with false plates, and time only usually are not. I think partly so the strike work has room to operate.
 

novicetimekeeper

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False plates were used on some early dial clocks, not just twin fusee. I think convex dial though. My flat dial dwerrihouse is twin fusee and doesn't have one.
 

jmclaugh

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A nice drop dial, it looks like rosewood. I can't quite make out the abbreviated first name but it should narrow down which of the Smarts in London it is.
 

Chris Radano

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Yes you are correct, a false plate would have no bearing on the strike work. So then perhaps false plate use for double fusees made it easier to use standard dials. With strike work there are less areas for dial feet holes. False plates give versatility to allow holes in the front plate.
 

Chris Radano

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Oops Jonathan, I forgot the first name is "Wm".
Loomes has a William Smart London simply, "early 19th c." Which does not narrow down the date enough .
Boy, it really has been a while since I looked at this clock :=
Now I like it again, I plan to get it running.
 

Sooth

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Beautiful clock, Chris. I don't know that I've ever noticed an English fusee movement with the barrels poking out the bottom like a little bum, haha. I tend to think most English movements were rather generous when it came to brass or plate sizes. I agree your hands may look much better.
 

Chris Radano

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There are many time only fusee movements from this period that have the spring barrel close to the edge of the plate. This one is a double fusee, two spring barrels are close to the edge. Thank you for the image of a bum, now I see that.
I have another twin fusee wall clock (hmmm, no thread for that one yet). However, the movement on that clock has shaped plates, thicker, and has 5 pillars. It is more finely finished than Wm. Smart.
Looks like Wm. Smart was trying to cut corners, save brass, etc. However, Smart's clock is certainly a substantial and adequate clock. There is plenty of brass, also his movement has a couple nice ornamental features.
 

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