Small parts request

POWERSTROKE

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Jan 11, 2011
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Where can you find the case screws to hole the cuckoo clock movements to the case? Some have different sizes as well.
Also, what do you guys do to make those holes in the wood tighter if the meat head before you stripped them out. I was told to put a piece of toothpick in.
Secondly, where can you get the little tiny beads to hold the cuckoo dials in and the longer ones to hold the front trim on?
 

R. Croswell

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To tighten holes in wood just drizzle a little thin CA glue (Super Glue) down the side of the hole and let it dry well before installing the screw. Just wet the sides of the hole, don't fill the hole. The CA glue seems to expand and harden the wood grain. For small screws and brads etc. try a good hardware store.

RC
 
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Willie X

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Beekeeping supply places sell good nails for clocks. They are thin and coated. Usually available in 3/4", 1" and 1 1/4".
The dial brads are called escusian (sp) pins and available from some of the clock supply and wood working houses.

At the ole hardware store most anything small is called a 'brad'.

Willie X
 
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JeffG

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You might also consider a polyurethane glue (Gorilla-type stuff) which works by expanding as it cures, though the next meat head might not appreciate it if it actually bonds the metal of the screw. Shouldn't be a problem as polyurethane glues are not known for their shear strength.
A better solution might be an internet search for a "wood swelling solution" which swells the wood but is not an adhesive. You'll find several to choose from.
A good hardware store should be able to help you with the hardware. I think most of the case screws I've used were #10 x 3/8" flat head slotted wood screws.
 

shutterbug

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And for the movement, look for short slotted screws of the same type at the local hardware. Phillips head screws just don't belong in a clock :)

Edit: Jeff beat me to the draw.
 

Schatznut

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Where can you find the case screws to hole the cuckoo clock movements to the case? Some have different sizes as well.
Also, what do you guys do to make those holes in the wood tighter if the meat head before you stripped them out. I was told to put a piece of toothpick in.
Secondly, where can you get the little tiny beads to hold the cuckoo dials in and the longer ones to hold the front trim on?
Yep, toothpicks are for more than just pegging pivot holes... ;) No glue necessary. If you can't find the hardware you need at the usual places (Timesavers, Merritt's, Ronell), consider McMaster-Carr. But be aware it's expen$ive and it's somewhat like Wile E. Coyote's Acme catalog - they've got everything you can think of and then some. It tends to be addicting.
 

POWERSTROKE

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Thanks for all the help guys. I’ll try a hardware store! They never seem to have this kind of stuff where I am.
 

Bruce Alexander

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If you know the size, there's a seller on eBay who carries small screws in practical quantities that most local stores I've checked do not carry.

See: lightningstainless on eBay

Fastenal.com will usually have what you need but if you don't have a local store their shipping charges are too high, especially if you're not looking to buy a lifetime supply.

As far as stripped wood screw holes are concerned, it runs the gamut. If it's not too bad, various glues might work well. Placing or gluing toothpicks is quick and dirty but it can cause the screw to move a little off center.

If the wood has really been stripped out, or if someone has placed an oversized fastener you might need more than glue. I'll often mix up sawdust and wood glue to make a wood putty. I partially fill the screw hole, place the fastener about halfway and let the glue harden overnight. You could also use a fast setting epoxy glue.

In severe cases, where strength is needed, I'll bore the hole out and glue in some hardwood dowel/pegs to start the fastening process over from scratch.

A reference resource to keep in mind is: https://mb.nawcc.org/threads/clock-suppliers-general-supply-tools-repair-service-etc-•.171838/

Good luck,

Bruce
 

JeffG

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That's what I do with CA glue. Wait until it has soaked in and cured for a day before putting in the screw. You want to tighten up the wood, not glue the screw in place.

RC
I figured that's what you meant. It got me wondering about the active ingredient of the swelling solutions and if maybe they are just a marketing trick to sell more superglue. Turns out the swelling products use dipropylene glycol. Now I'm wondering if the swelling products would be a better choice because the CA glues dry so hard and crunchy.
That's probably a line of thought better suited to the Case Construction & Restoration area.
 
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shutterbug

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If the hole is really wallowed out, you can mix sawdust with wood glue, pack it into the hole, let it dry and then put the screw in. You might have to start it with a drill bit.
 

Bruce Alexander

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That's what I was suggesting too SB. I don't fill the hole completely though and I'll seat the fastener about halfway in while the putty is still soft. That starts, or re-establishes the screw hole center without having to drill. If you do decide to drill, the hole is pre-centered for you.

The putty shouldn't stick to the screw if you've added a lot of sawdust but you can apply a thin film of lubricant to the end of the screw threads just to make sure. A little furniture paste wax (I've used Minwax) or even a thin film of some other lubricant should do the trick.
 

R. Croswell

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One other method that we should mention is to drill out the hole and glue in a dowel then drill a new hole in the dowel. Especially helpful if the wallowed out hole is no longer centered.

RC
 

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