Slick 50® One Lube®

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by Jake SD, Jun 13, 2014.

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  1. Jake SD

    Jake SD Registered User

    May 11, 2014
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    I'm new to the forum so I hope I am posting correctly. I've been reading a lot about Slick 50 One Lube for mainsprings.
    I'm working on my first clock movement. My question is, can One Lube be used lubricating all of the clock mechanism?
    I do have clock oil.
    Thanks.
     
  2. shutterbug

    shutterbug Super Moderator
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    Re: How to oil a clock

    Nope. Use it for mainsprings, but nothing else. Your clock oil will be better for pivots.
     
  3. Jake SD

    Jake SD Registered User

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    Re: How to oil a clock

    Thank you, shutterbug. One more question, between the hour hand and the minute hand, there is a washer. Do I put oil in this area?
     
  4. shutterbug

    shutterbug Super Moderator
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    Re: How to oil a clock

    Nope. :)
     
  5. harold bain

    harold bain Forums Administrator
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    Re: How to oil a clock

    I've often wondered that myself, but haven't tried it. If it is your own clock, why not give it a try? Don't spray the movement, just catch some oil in a cup then use a pin oiler, or a toothpick to oil the pivots.
     
  6. shutterbug

    shutterbug Super Moderator
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    Re: How to oil a clock

    If you do that, please post the results and post again if any issues arise :)
     
  7. Jay Fortner

    Jay Fortner Registered User
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    Re: How to oil a clock

    I have been experimenting with Slick1 as a pivot and pallet lube for a couple months now. It seems to be doing a good job on pallets and pallet pins in both pend. and flywheel clocks and small low power pivots such as EW,lever pivots,roller and balance staff pivots in flywheel clocks. When using it as a pivot and pallet lube it's best applied as a thin film. As Harold suggested spray it out into some kind of small container. Then using a clean toothpick apply it in the pivot hole or on the pallets during assembly.
    This is in the test stage so anyone reading this should not try it on someone elses clock.
     
  8. bangster

    bangster Super Moderator
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    #8 bangster, Jun 18, 2014
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 19, 2014
    Re: Slick 50® One Lube

    I think I recall that aerosol Slick1 is one of those where the carrier liquid soon evaporates, leaving behind the teflon (or whatever) bits to do the job. If that's the case, it might be less effective in low surface-area situations like pivots.

    Strictly speculation on my part. Take it for what it's worth.
     
  9. John Hubby

    John Hubby Principal Administrator
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    #9 John Hubby, Jun 19, 2014
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2014
    Bang, the original formula for Slick 50 One Lube did contain "collodial" Teflon® that would not settle out with time (I tested this myself), but even back then the carrier oil did NOT evaporate. It was a low viscosity synthetic/natural blend very similar to your regular clock oil, the propellant in the spray cans was a propane/butane mix which does evaporate as the spray is applied. The claimed purpose of the Teflon® was to adhere to the bearing surfaces providing a much lower friction surface than can be obtained using "just oil", same claim as made for the original Slick 50 HP Synthetic with Teflon®. The particle size of the Teflon® was claimed to be sub-micron, if so you would not see any evidence of clogging up pivots or mainsprings or the like.My personal experience with the original Slick 50 HP Synthetic shows 20+ years closed-barrel mainspring service without any lubricant deterioration or needing to be re-lubricated, by actual test. The clocks under test have been opened every five years for inspection, the last time was in 2013 and I'm not going to open them again until the clocks stop from lack of lube on the pivots. The pivot oil (Etsyntha 859 synthetic) does seem to disappear after 10 years or so.Slick 50 the company lost a final legal battle with DuPont within the past five years that resulted in them removing Teflon® from all their products. Their other additives (composition unknown) continue to be included, and my digging into this indicates they changed the synthetic/natural oil blend ratio to one with less synthetic. I don't know the ratio but am guessing it's now about 85% synthetic 15% natural. Both the synthetic and natural are compatible relatively short-chain aliphatic compounds that are highly resistant to chemical or heat breakdown. The present Slick 50 One Lube does seem to perform as well as the Teflon® version at least for four years (that's how long I've had it on test, mainsprings only).Note that the results I report here are primarily in service with torsion pendulum clocks . . 8-Day, 30-Day, 400-Day, and 1000-Day. I also have some 14-day French conical pendulum clocks running that exhibit similar performance as the torsion clocks.
     
  10. bangster

    bangster Super Moderator
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    #10 bangster, Jun 19, 2014
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 19, 2014
    Hey John...Thanks very much for the update and correction. Faulty memory is never a decent substitute for accurate information.
     
  11. MuensterMann

    MuensterMann Registered User

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    "The pivot oil (Etsyntha 859 synthetic) does seem to disappear after 10 years or so," John says.

    I have been curious about this. So, when the pivot oil disappears, do you add more oil? Of course, when it disappears there is something that remains in the form of dirt and dried oil. I have learned with my bicycle chain that you must clean the chain first before applying more oil - otherwise you are just adding oil to a dirt/grime layer.

    The curiosity is also there about "having a clock serviced". Service may include adjustments, but does it also mean adding oil to the pivots? If so, is that really a good thing to do (see paragraph above)?
     
  12. shutterbug

    shutterbug Super Moderator
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    Many advise oiling after five years, servicing again after 10.
     
  13. Jay Fortner

    Jay Fortner Registered User
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    I recommend reoiling every two years and service intervals depend on environmental issues. For clocks that reside in nice clean houses and neighborhoods with paved streets and grassy lawns then you could get by with servicing in ten year periods. In areas with dirt roads and sandy landscapes five year service intervals would be better. No one service period applies to all.
     
  14. shutterbug

    shutterbug Super Moderator
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    Good point, Jay. We tend to judge things from a narrow perspective based on our own situation instead of the global family that we are :)
     
  15. MuensterMann

    MuensterMann Registered User

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    Okay, so "servicing a clock" means disassemble, clean, reassemble and lubricate a movement? Then, the re-oil in the meantime is simply called "oiling" which is just the pivots and whatever else that does not require disassmbly of the movement?
     
  16. Jay Fortner

    Jay Fortner Registered User
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    That's the idea. On some of the more complicated movements some disassembly is required to get to hidden pivots but you wouldn't split the plates.
     
  17. bangster

    bangster Super Moderator
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    Oiling MUST include the front plate. Either take the movement out, or take the dial and bezel off. Otherwise, you're only half-oiling.
     
  18. MuensterMann

    MuensterMann Registered User

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    Thanks for the input!!
     
  19. paul830

    paul830 Registered User

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    John, What are your thoughts about using Slick 50 on an Atmos mainspring? Thanks, Paul
     
  20. Les Sanders

    Les Sanders Registered User
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    I now use Slick 50 Original on all Mainsprings, And Mobil 1 0W - 20W on all pivots, except platform escapements I use watch oil! No problems have been noticed.
     
  21. Jay Fortner

    Jay Fortner Registered User
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    Not speaking for John but Slick 1 will perform well on light mainsprings like used in Atmos clocks. I have changed to STP for medium to heavy mainsprings with very good results.
     
  22. David S

    David S Registered User
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    Hi Jay,

    Haven't seen you around much lately. Miss your contributions. When you say STP, what exactly are you using? Around here there are lots of STP products.

    David
     
  23. Jay Fortner

    Jay Fortner Registered User
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    The original oil additive. Thick and slicker'n snot. Remember the 70's TV ad where the sumo wrestler couldn't hold the tip of a screwdriver that had been dipped in it? That stuff. Mainsprings wind up and let down like silk.
     
  24. MuensterMann

    MuensterMann Registered User

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    Has anyone ever tested the new Slick 50 formula for use on mainsprings? My old can finished and only new formula on the shelves. I bought it to use as well. We shall see!
     

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