Simplex Master Type 25 info

Discussion in 'Electric Horology' started by barcoboy, Jan 15, 2008.

  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  1. barcoboy

    barcoboy Registered User

    Jan 15, 2008
    53
    0
    6
    Hi everybody. I just recently became the proud owner of a Simplex Master clock, Type 25, serial number S-1899FG. Pictures can be found at:

    http://staarage.ubishops.ca/Simplex

    I got a good deal on it because the owner who acquired it, who used to fix mechanical clocks for a living, wasn't sure that the electrical portion of the clock worked, and didn't want to risk burning anything out testing it. As you can see by one of the photos, a pair of feed wires had been cut when it was taken out of service. After manually winding it a bit, and a few probes of my multimeter, I connected a new cord and plug to the two terminals, and the clock worked great. Further investigation revealed that someone must have been annoyed at hearing the correction impulses sent out at the 59 minute mark every hour, but re-adjusting the 2 second contacts and the clock now pulses correctly at the right time at the 59th minute.

    Now I'd like to figure out how to wire up some slaves clocks to it, but it doesn't appear that this clock supports 24 volt slaves. Can someone here confirm this, and let me know what the correct way to wire up slaves to this clock would be? Would I need to find/build a relay cabinet in order to use 24 volt slaves, using the AC lines on the clock to keep it wound, and a separate 24 volt power supply in the relay cabinet to pulse the slaves?

    Many thanks in advance for any help or information about this particular clock you can provide me.
     
  2. fdew

    fdew Registered User

    Jul 12, 2007
    233
    4
    18
    It looks as though you are not set up to run 24 volt DC slaves but you have all the contacts on the master, all you lack is the 24 V AC power supply, one relay, and the correct wiring.

    For a half dozen slaves the power supply can be as simple as a Radio Shack 24 Volt wall wart and a full wave bridge rectifier. You will need a relay because Simplex switches the power supply with 110 volts to keep down the current and make the contacts last longer. If you want to go ahead and build the power supply / control, one of us can send you a diagram.

    You have a odd clock as far as wiring but the movement and it's contacts are very standard. One thing I am curious about is the voltage of the winding coils. Because of the resistors, I suspect that they are 24 VDC You might want to check them during an impulse.

    Frank
     
  3. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
    NAWCC Member Deceased

    Nov 4, 2002
    40,850
    162
    63
    Male
    deceased
    Whitby, Ontario, Canada
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Hi barcoboy, welcome to the message board. Looks like you have just about everything you need to run slaves, but it appears your clock was made to run 110 volt ac slaves. You would need to make a power supply with a 24 volt transformer and recifier. Also required is a couple of 110 volt relays.
     
  4. fdew

    fdew Registered User

    Jul 12, 2007
    233
    4
    18
    So Harold, Do you think the two big gray cartridges are fuses or resistors? Also the big can it the top left? It looks like a Capacitor. If so, I would remove it before it leaks.

    If the wind coils are 120 VDC I guess you could still wire the clock for 24 VDC slaves, just put a little bridge rectifier across the could and connect the input across the master relay.

    I have a old 601 drawing and it shows the master switching 24 VAC not 120 VAC as the 090 movement masters did. It could be changed to a 120 VAC relay coil if you need to because of your wind coil. If you want a scan of it let me know.

    Frank
     
  5. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
    NAWCC Member Deceased

    Nov 4, 2002
    40,850
    162
    63
    Male
    deceased
    Whitby, Ontario, Canada
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Frank, I can't really see what he has there. My parts book shows 110 volt DC wind coils, but no AC coils, so there must be a rectifier there somewhere. I also see 110 volt DC slave clocks. His terminals don't show the ABC connections for running slaves, which would simplify things.
     
  6. barcoboy

    barcoboy Registered User

    Jan 15, 2008
    53
    0
    6
    Thanks guys for the quick replies.

    Harold, if you take a look at the 4th picture on my website, the small square device in the middle of the photo is the rectifier. You can also see the labels on the side are marked 115V 60CY (which I'm assuming is 115V 60Hz AC), 115VDC, and COIL.

    Not sure if you saw the Terminals.txt file which was also at my site, but the closest thing I have to ABC terminals is A, C 115VAC, and C 115VDC. I have done some multimeter probing between A, C 115VAC and A, C 115VDC, but I'm getting both AC and DC voltages during each impulse at both pairs. I'll have to do some more testing to see if the pulses stop at one of these test pairs when the stop switch opens.

    fdew, I believe the two cartridges are fuses. I also believe you are correct in thinking the can at the top left is a capacitor... it is wired directly inline with the wind coil, probably to smooth out things during each impulse and help prevent the contacts from arcing.

    I've got a friend of my family who is the head of maintenance at the local school board where I live. He is going to take me to one of the local elementary schools to see the remains of the master/slave system there, which I believe to be Simplex or possibly ITR/IBM. Recently, I went into the school's gym, and saw way up high on the wall a Simplex slave, which was left there because it was too much trouble to take down. According to my friend, the master clock is gone, but I'm hoping that there will still be a relay cabinet intact somewhere in the school, and I'll be able to get the information from it I need to build my own, or better yet, my friend might let me take it home. I might need to modify it depending on what voltage rating the relays are, but it would be a great starting point. Hopefully there will be some slaves as well that I could get my hands on.

    Actually, how I first got interested in master/slave clocks was the master clock that was at my elementary school. By the time I got there in 1978, all of the slaves had been disconnected and replaced with regular electric clocks (the slaves remained in the classrooms though), but the master kept running to ring the bells. I remember hearing it in the library impulsing every minute, and also sending the correction impulses out, which is why I'm pretty sure it was an ITR/IBM/Simplex (I also remember it looking like my clock, and the slaves were IBM brand I believe). I missed those sounds, and now that I am older and financially better off, I decided I wanted to hear them again. :)
     
  7. ibm clock

    ibm clock Registered User

    Sep 5, 2005
    213
    0
    16
    The rectifier stack looks way too small( think milliamps) to run a whole system of clocks, so my best guess it's simply for the wind motor, and the clocks are AC power, like has been suggested.
     
  8. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
    NAWCC Member Deceased

    Nov 4, 2002
    40,850
    162
    63
    Male
    deceased
    Whitby, Ontario, Canada
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    If there is an ABC connection, you should be able to read the pulse once a minute when the wind magnet energizes between A and C.
    Where are you located? Shame to see all these old systems scrapped for lack of maintenance money in the school boards. The older slave clocks could easily last another 50 years, if anyone cared to maintain them.
     
  9. ibm clock

    ibm clock Registered User

    Sep 5, 2005
    213
    0
    16

    The could easily last, if someone could make new contacts and other relavent parts. Even the supply of NOS spare parts would dry up at some time.
     
  10. fdew

    fdew Registered User

    Jul 12, 2007
    233
    4
    18
    The box you are looking for is a 601 It will have a transformer and a relay and a switch among other things. About 15 in tall and 20 in wide. They were usually right next to the master or in the nearest equipment room. Some times in a closet off the main office, or a room in the basement near the office. If the school is big, or had additions then there might be a similar box called a 604. This was a booster Grab that if you can, it has many components common to the 601.

    Worst case, You remove all the electrical stuff from your clock except the contacts and wind coil. You build your own 601 from scratch and we figure a creative way to get 120VDC to the coil. As I said earlier, probably run your 601 with 120VAC and run your coil in parrel with the relay with a bridge rectifier between them.

    All you need is a transformer, rectifier, DPDT switch, relay and some wire. Not to bad at all. You have a very nice clock there.

    BTW When I saw an opening at Simplex I applied for similar reasons to your interest. I had observed the clock system while I was in school and it looked like fun. It was.

    Frank
     
  11. barcoboy

    barcoboy Registered User

    Jan 15, 2008
    53
    0
    6
    I think I'm going to hook up a couple of multimeters tonight and log what happens. Afterwards if I have time, I'm going to take the hands and face off and do a complete wire trace to see exactly how it is wired up. Shouldn't be too difficult, as all the wires are tagged. As soon as I'm done, I'll post the drawing to my web site and send the link.

    I am located in Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada. Unfortunately, the decision to scrap the slaves was made many years ago, back in the mid to late 1970s, and I believe most of them are long gone. Hopefully I will be able to find a few in my travels though. I'd like to set up a display, having the master clock, a relay cabinet, and a group of four to six slave clocks set to different time zones all close by, and also have a few slaves in various other places in my house. It would be nice if the group of slaves were all identical, and then the others could be different brands/styles.

    I also remember as a kid that the only thing I used to enjoy about going to the hospital was watching all of the clocks step ahead by one minute at the same time in the out patients waiting room. I've always loved all types of clocks, but there was/is something about this type of system that really has me hooked.
     
  12. ibm clock

    ibm clock Registered User

    Sep 5, 2005
    213
    0
    16
    Some guys have all the luck. Wish I had a wood case master. I have a 91 series, made sometime after 1958. But I have a mix of old and new slave clocks, though.
     
  13. fdew

    fdew Registered User

    Jul 12, 2007
    233
    4
    18
    When you check out the school, check the boiler room first, then any basement offices, then small offices off the gym. When we had a A-B short, I got good at finding hidden and forgotten clocks.

    If you are very lucky, there is some place with a low ceiling where things are stored for ever. The box of clocks are a long way back and they are not labeled clocks.
    Good Luck.

    BTW ask the maintenance guy if any of the schools had Synchronome systems ;-)

    Frank
     
  14. ibm clock

    ibm clock Registered User

    Sep 5, 2005
    213
    0
    16
    I tried that at my old grade school. Unfortunatly, didn't find anything. We cleaned that place from top to bottom. Even the church boiler room. Took what was probably the last remaining IBM electronic slave because it was taken down and stored under the kitchen sink.
     
  15. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
    NAWCC Member Deceased

    Nov 4, 2002
    40,850
    162
    63
    Male
    deceased
    Whitby, Ontario, Canada
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    My best find was made while looking for the dredded AB short. Looking under the false ceilings in the classrooms trying to find a splitter box to isolate the problem, I noticed in 3 classrooms there were old wall clocks still hanging there, covered over by the ceiling. They were from the original system, and dated to 1923. Solid oak cases, original IBM movements. Had to strip a few layers of paint, but they were priceless to me:thumb:
     
  16. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
    NAWCC Member Deceased

    Nov 4, 2002
    40,850
    162
    63
    Male
    deceased
    Whitby, Ontario, Canada
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Here's a picture of it. Some day I will get the dial repainted. It has a 14 inch dial.
     

    Attached Files:

  17. fdew

    fdew Registered User

    Jul 12, 2007
    233
    4
    18
    Very nice.and a A-B short got you a friend. I don't recall anything that good. I like the hands and the very old style numbers I have two that are very similar but with newer simpler hands. They were in a convent. One fell off the wall when the screws pulled out of the dry wood.and the pieces of oak split apart on impact with the floor. The nuns had cleaned it up and saved every piece. I explained that there contract would cover a replacement clock but that they really should keep the old one and have some one repair the case. They said no. I put a new clock in a obscure office and moved that one to the main hall where the oak one was. I took the bag of pieces home and it is still in my kitchen.

    Attached is the kitchen and office clocks

    Frank
     

    Attached Files:

  18. fdew

    fdew Registered User

    Jul 12, 2007
    233
    4
    18
    I got the wrong one for the office

    Frank
     

    Attached Files:

  19. barcoboy

    barcoboy Registered User

    Jan 15, 2008
    53
    0
    6
    Those are some awesome looking clocks guys. The only slave I have is newer than that but in much worse shape... a Simplex 2310. Works okay, but the case is very rusty and partially painted, not to mention the paint is flaking off of the hands a bit. Bought it before I got the master, figuring one day I could put it out in my garage-once I build it that is.

    I was able to do the multimeter testing tonight, and found the following:

    Between points "A COM" and "C 115VAC", I get 120VAC at each impulse, and a small DC voltage (around 21 volts) when the contacts open, which quickly leaks off (could be the capacitor discharging).

    Between points "A COM" and "C 115VDC", I get 51VDC at each impulse, and only trace AC voltages, again when the contacts open and quickly disappears. I believe this was the same voltage that I measured at the wind coil when I had the clock apart when I first got it, but will have to double check.

    These measurements were taken at various impulses between 15 minutes before the hour, up to 5 minutes past the hour, including the correction impulses during the 59th minute. So it looks like these terminals are not the standard A-B-C ones.

    Didn't have time tonight to disassemble and draw up a wiring diagram, but I should have time soon hopefully to do so. Hopefully I'll be able to figure out how to use the 1-2-3-4-5 terminals to run my slaves with some relays. Would be nice to have an advance switch as well. Question about that-was the advance switch also used to wind the master clock if the power went off for an extended period of time? I know that this wasn't a problem with the weight driven motor wound masters, as the motor would wind the clock as soon as the power came back on, but there must have been a way to wind the spring wound masters if the power went off long enough to fully unwind the mainspring, without having to wind it a bit manually? I know mine will run at least eight hours without power.

    No Synchronome systems that I remember, but if I come across anything, I'll be sure to let you know Frank. Where in the US are you located?
     
  20. fdew

    fdew Registered User

    Jul 12, 2007
    233
    4
    18
    Your exactly right about the advance switch. It puts the 2 sec contact in the circuit until you turn it back to run so you have one pulse to wind the clock every 2 sec. after 10 0r 15 of those, the master is not fully wound but enough to keep running and it will get 15 extra every hour. That will wind it in time.

    I am near Rochester NY

    Frank
     
  21. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
    NAWCC Member Deceased

    Nov 4, 2002
    40,850
    162
    63
    Male
    deceased
    Whitby, Ontario, Canada
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    If you watch ebay, slave clocks come up from time to time. I'm sure we can draw you up a power supply to run slaves, once you give us a wiring diagram of your clock. These clocks came with 48 volt DC slaves and wind coil on special order. Not easy to find the slaves now, though.
    Frank, nice clocks. Is that last one copper?
     
  22. fdew

    fdew Registered User

    Jul 12, 2007
    233
    4
    18
    Yes, It was painted from the factory. I striped the paint to show off the copper. It had no correction, and had a pull wire to set it from outside one min at a time.

    I have seen later ones that were steel with a copper plate then paint. They made some wonderfull high quality stuff.

    Frank
     
  23. barcoboy

    barcoboy Registered User

    Jan 15, 2008
    53
    0
    6
    OK, I've drawn up a basic wiring diagram, posted at my web site:

    http://staarage.ubishops.ca/Simplex

    Sorry for the quality-it was done with Windows Paint.

    Note the red colored traces are the smaller black wires that interconnect various terminals within the movement, while the black traces are black braided wires that connect to the upper terminal block or rectifier assembly.

    Oops-just realized that I forgot to draw in the capacitor, but it is connected directly to the two wind coil terminals.

    I also didn't draw the trace for the D2 terminal, as the photo I found of the clock movement didn't seem to have only one set of duration contacts, and neither of my duration contacts are being used anyways.

    Not sure how the back of the rectifier assembly is wired up... my guess is that the negative of the DC and the AC neutral line must be tied together, otherwise a fourth wire/terminal would be needed. I also took a measurement on the wind coil while I was in there, and found 51VDC at an impulse, and no AC volts, except for induction voltage after the contacts opened.

    Anybody want to convert the drawing into an electrical schematic? :) I would have done that instead of doing the drawing I ended up with, but I didn't have a diagram of the set of movement contact terminals to start with. But hopefully this will give you a good idea of how my movement is wired.
     
  24. ibm clock

    ibm clock Registered User

    Sep 5, 2005
    213
    0
    16
    Could you include a close up picof just the clock contacts? also trace out the rectifier connections?
     
  25. fdew

    fdew Registered User

    Jul 12, 2007
    233
    4
    18
    This is good stuff and it all makes sense. 1/2 have rectified 120 AC will give about 50 volts DC That means that if you decide to build a 601 and run some slaves at 24 VDC you can rewire the two could in parallel and you are all set with 24 VDC coils.

    Frank
     
  26. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
    NAWCC Member Deceased

    Nov 4, 2002
    40,850
    162
    63
    Male
    deceased
    Whitby, Ontario, Canada
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Here is a schematic for a 601-9 relay box used to run secondary clocks. It shows the 1 2 3 4 5 terminals as on your clock.
     

    Attached Files:

  27. barcoboy

    barcoboy Registered User

    Jan 15, 2008
    53
    0
    6
    Thanks for the schematics Harold. To better understand how everything works, I'm going to make multiple copies of this diagram, then electrically trace the path depending on the state of each contract at a specific time during the hourly cycle, highlighting the electrical path. Once I understand that, I think I'll be able to figure something out to wire up my clock.

    Frank, so what you're saying is that I've got a half-wave rectifier, or in other words, only one diode connected to the AC (as per the lower section of the page http://www.tpub.com/neets/book7/27a.htm). That would indeed explain the 51 volts DC I'm seeing.

    Unfortunately, I cannot at the time provide any closeup pictures of the movement contacts, as I actually don't own a digital camera. The photos on my web site are the ones that the guy I bought the clock from took for his auction.

    I've emailed my friend to schedule a time to go check out the local elementary school-hopefully he'll have time soon, and I'll hit the jackpot and bring home a relay cabinet and a box full of slaves (I can dream, can't I?).
     
  28. fdew

    fdew Registered User

    Jul 12, 2007
    233
    4
    18
    Yes, A half wave rectifier (single diode) gives you 120 volts over 1/2 the cycle. Over the other half it gives you nothing. The average will be about 50 to 50 volts.

    Some where in the archives there is a very involved explanation of IBM / Simplex timing, but a quick one is this.

    From the first minute (0 min.) to the 59th minute you should see a 2 sec pulse between A and C on the output of the 601
    From 59 min 10 sec until about 45 you should receive a short pulse every 2 sec between A and C

    From 00 pulse through the 50 min pulse will also show up between B and C (A and B are connected together from just before the 00 pulse but after the correction pulses until the 50 min pulse

    If you turn the min hand slowly you will see a contact open at 50 min Then go very slowly. A contact will close at 59' 10" and almost immediately open at 59' 45 sec

    The first contact you saw open was the 50 min switch, the second one was the 35 sec contact. All that is left is the minute impulse contact, and the 2 sec contact and you have already found those.

    Frank
     
  29. barcoboy

    barcoboy Registered User

    Jan 15, 2008
    53
    0
    6
    Does anyone have a closeup photo of the contacts of a movement similar to mine, without any wires connected, that they could post? It would make it easier for me to convert my drawing into an electrical schematic.
     
  30. caperace

    caperace Registered User

    Nov 1, 2006
    163
    2
    18
    Male
    Country Flag:
    Will this help?

    Jim
     

    Attached Files:

  31. barcoboy

    barcoboy Registered User

    Jan 15, 2008
    53
    0
    6
    That's great-thanks Jim.
     
  32. barcoboy

    barcoboy Registered User

    Jan 15, 2008
    53
    0
    6
    I've made some good progress over this past weekend.

    First of all, the wiring and contacts all make sense to me now, including the 601-9 cabinet schematic that Harold attached. Only thing I'm wondering is-why the multiple taps on the transformer? Was this cabinet made for 48VDC slaves, or do all 601-9 cabinets have multiple tap transformers?

    Second, I took apart the rectifier assembly on my clock to see how it is wired. As it turns out, the two cartridges are not fuses, they are resistors. The top one measured 300 ohms, and the bottom one measured 900 ohms, which corresponds to the 300 and 900 printed in behind the holders (not visible until the cartridges were removed). I've added a schematic on my web site:

    http://staarage.ubishops.ca/Simplex

    I've also compared the wiring of my clock, and it looks like the 1-2-3-4-5 wiring all go to the correct contact terminals. My clock has been wired so that the 1-2 wires are used to trigger the wind coil. I've redone the wiring diagram, and figured out that there are a couple of ways I can wire the coil up to keep the clock wound.

    1) I can keep the 120VAC/resistors/recitifier circuit wired to the clock, and use a relay inside the clock wired up to trigger when a pulse comes down the #1 wire (as shown in file 1-2-3-4-5-Scenario1).

    2) Same as #1, but wire the relay in the cabinet and send a 120VAC pulse to the existing AC inputs on the clock.

    3) I can forget about the resistors and rectifier and wire an additional relay inside the cabinet in series to the existing one to send a 48 volt DC pulse to the coil directly (if the transformer in the cabinet I find (wishful thinking!) supports 48 volts).

    Now all I need to do is find a cabinet. But I think I have the knowledge now that I could build one myself if I needed to.
     
  33. barcoboy

    barcoboy Registered User

    Jan 15, 2008
    53
    0
    6
    No news to report as of yet. My friend has been quite busy, and hasn't got back to me with regards to a time when we can go hunting.

    In the meantime, I noticed something about my clock that I haven't seen on any other photo of an IBM movement. On the hour gear, my clock seems to have an extra metal ridge on the front of it. Have a look at this quick drawing:

    http://staarage.ubishops.ca/Simplex/hourgear.bmp

    I'm assuming it must have been to trip a cam of some sort every 12 hours.

    Also, how difficult would it be add an impulse accumulator to my clock, if I were ever able to find one somewhere?
     
  34. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
    NAWCC Member Deceased

    Nov 4, 2002
    40,850
    162
    63
    Male
    deceased
    Whitby, Ontario, Canada
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    You are right, it is to trip a microswitch for 12 hour correction on Synchronous wall clocks.
    Adding an accumulator will be much easier than finding one:?|
     
  35. fdew

    fdew Registered User

    Jul 12, 2007
    233
    4
    18
    Is it possible to get at the wire between the two wind coils? If so you have another option, You can rewire the coils in parallel and run them with 24 VDC.

    The taps on the transformer are for long runs and or large numbers of clocks so you can pick a tap that has enough volts at the last clock. Most schools around here used # 14 copper wire (.046 in.) so there was no problem. Also, the custom was to put a booster on a new wing or large addition.

    BTW Many college campuses were run with one master clock and a booster in each building. The booster had the added advantage that it would isolate problems so a shorted system would only mess up one building. It was handy to know where the boosters were as they contained relays and needed service. Some were so obscure that I would actually leave instructions in the master clock.

    Harold, others, do you have memoirs of searching for a booster that had to be there, but where? To the teacher, do you ever hear a electrical box make a clicking noise. Why yes, off the coat room in that closet where I keep my coat there is...... Could you show me while the School electrician watches the kids?

    Frank
     
  36. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
    NAWCC Member Deceased

    Nov 4, 2002
    40,850
    162
    63
    Male
    deceased
    Whitby, Ontario, Canada
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Frank, I have many memories of rooting around under the false ceilings in older schools seeking booster panels and junction boxes. But I always started my search by asking the principal/chief caretaker to show me every room where the kids were left with minimum supervision, such as change rooms, student counsel rooms, drama class, shop class, etc. About 95 % of the time, I found the problem to be related to idle hands:bang:
    One school, devoted to routing lesser ability kids into apprentiships in the trades, had a shop teacher who thought he could improve on the looks of the wall clock in his classroom. So he took the movement out of the clock and mounted it into a fancy piece of wood he had made. Didn't know what to do with the extra wires, so he wired them together. Took me half a day to find that one.
    Like they say, those who can-do. Those who can't-teach. Those who can't teach-teach shop:bang:
     
  37. barcoboy

    barcoboy Registered User

    Jan 15, 2008
    53
    0
    6
    Great stories... Working in the world of computers, I see so many stupid things done that nothing surprises me much anymore. (What's this file? I guess I don't need it... delete. Hello? Helpdesk? My computer's not working anymore.) But it's always good to hear non-computer related stupid stories such as these.

    Frank, I can see the wire which runs between the two coils, but it's so short that I'd be afraid to try to cut and splice into it. Easy enough if my box has a 48 volt transformer tap to run another pair of wires between it and the master, or if I have to make my own cabinet to buy a multi-tap transformer.

    And to those who can't teach shop-manage!

     
  38. fdew

    fdew Registered User

    Jul 12, 2007
    233
    4
    18
    One of my favorite trouble shooting adventures was a time stamp that lost 6 minutes every Monday Wednesday and Friday. After numerous calls and a loner time stamp that did the same thing I was convinced it was losing power but I had no idea why. I finally rigged up a relay in a box. The relay was held energized by 120 volts and a outlet was powered through the contacts. I showed the maintenance man how to reset it and we waited. Sure enough. Every other day it would quit at about 8:25 PM He staged a watchman at the clock and every other day,.........

    Wait for it,







    The cleaning lady came in, unplugged the clock, and plugged in her vacuum and went to work.


    Frank
     

Share This Page