Shrinkage

pocket2100

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Nov 17, 2020
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Well, it was bound to happen. Have been getting into the hobby and been buying several watches as I find a good deal, and I try to remember to make sure they are around size 18 or 16, but forgot to do that this time. So I got a watch that looks like a shrunken head when next to the others. :)

I don't mind at all, it's still very impressive, but really I'm not into the teeny tiny ones like this. It's sterling and keeps decent time, and I like the look.

I have no idea who made it though, I don't see any serial numbers or manufacturer names anywhere on it. Any ideas?

re_20201124_135703.jpg re_20201124_134803.jpg re_20201124_135647.jpg re_20201124_135235.jpg re_20201124_140311.jpg re_20201124_140022.jpg re_20201124_135450.jpg
 

topspin

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Dec 14, 2014
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The movement looks very European e.g. Swiss.

Enjoy it for what it is, and don't worry about all the things that it isn't.
 
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musicguy

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Swiss watch moved to the European section


Rob
 

richiec

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Definitely Swiss of decent quality. There may be some markings under the dial if you feel like taking the hands and dial off but if you break anything, it will be difficult to find parts. Like topspin said, enjoy it if it runs well, the case is worth more than the movement.
 

pocket2100

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Thanks for moving the thread. I do see "Swiss" on the case, so if the movement hasn't been changed then it make sense it would be a European movement. I also see some silver hallmarks, so I'll have to look them up to find out more about the case.

Completely agree with your recommendations, I will enjoy it for what it is. I don't just value it if it's silver or gold, I value these watches for their uniqueness, history, and extreme engineering that went into them. And at a time where people wouldn't see so much as a bicycle for many more decades, that truly impresses me.
 
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richiec

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Well, the case is sterling silver, right now in the US, pure silver is going for about $23 an ounce. So figure from there. I have seen that design of movement before but being an American watch guy, can't remember where. Worth a clean and oil in my opinion.
 

Les harland

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The little bear on the right in picture No5 is a Swiss Hallmark for Silver 0.875 and above used between 1882 and 1934
The 0.935 the exact grade

To put in into perspective Sterling Silver is 0.925
 

John Matthews

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I believe your watch case will be post 1890. Swiss 935 silver was introduced in response to the restrictions on import of silver into the UK following the British Merchandise Marks Act of 1887, the regulations of which were in force from the beginning of 1888. From that date until the third quarter of 1890 Swiss 935 silver was stamped with three bears. However, American customers preferred a single bear (as shown on this case), so while 3 bears continued to be used on cases exported to the UK, American cases were stamped with 935 and a single bear.

The best source of information is David Boettcher's site here.

Scroll down to Three Bears for Angleterre!

John
 

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