• Important Executive Director Announcement from the NAWCC

    The NAWCC Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Mr. Rory McEvoy has been named Executive Director of the NAWCC. Rory is an internationally renowned horological scholar and comes to the NAWCC with strong credentials that solidly align with our education, fundraising, and membership growth objectives. He has a postgraduate degree in the conservation and restoration of antique clocks from West Dean College, and throughout his career, he has had the opportunity to handle some of the world’s most important horological artifacts, including longitude timekeepers by Harrison, Kendall, and Mudge.

    Rory formerly worked as Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, where his role included day-to-day management of research and digitization projects, writing, public speaking, conservation, convening conferences, exhibition work, and development of acquisition/disposal and collection care policies. In addition, he has worked as a horological specialist at Bonhams in London, where he cataloged and handled many rare timepieces and built important relationships with collectors, buyers, and sellers. Most recently, Rory has used his talents to share his love of horology at the university level by teaching horological theory, history, and the practical repair and making of clocks and watches at Birmingham City University.

    Rory is a British citizen and currently resides in the UK. Pre-COVID-19, Rory and his wife, Kaai, visited HQ in Columbia, Pennsylvania, where they met with staff, spent time in the Museum and Library & Research Center, and toured the area. Rory and Kaai will be relocating to the area as soon as the immigration challenges and travel restrictions due to COVID-19 permit.

    Some of you may already be familiar with Rory as he is also a well-known author and lecturer. His recent publications include the book Harrison Decoded: Towards a Perfect Pendulum Clock, which he edited with Jonathan Betts, and the article “George Graham and the Orrery” in the journal Nuncius.

    Until Rory’s relocation to the United States is complete, he will be working closely with an on-boarding team assembled by the NAWCC Board of Directors to introduce him to the opportunities and challenges before us and to ensure a smooth transition. Rory will be participating in strategic and financial planning immediately, which will allow him to hit the ground running when he arrives in Columbia

    You can read more about Rory McEvoy and this exciting announcement in the upcoming March/April issue of the Watch & Clock Bulletin.

    Please join the entire Board and staff in welcoming Rory to the NAWCC community.

Shop Pictures

doc_fields

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Awhile back there were some posts in this area of some of the group members shops and work areas. I've wanted to include mine, but was too busy until the holiday week to clean and organize it again. Anyway, here goes.....

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This is my clock bench. The screwdrivers in the acrylic holder are all Wiha's. I got them at my local electronics store. I really like them and they are good quality for what I do. The small removable vise is a Chinese copy of the Bergeon vise, and it has worked quite well for me.

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This bench contains clocks waiting reassembly. I use lots of Cool Whip containers to hold the plates, wheels and springs. It also contains my watchmaker's lathe and its accessories.

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This is my watch bench. On top I have my Bergeon staking set, MTG 3000 watch timer, stereo microscope, and screwdrivers and loupe. The screwdriver set on the extreme right was a cheap set from the now-defunct S. LaRose Co. I actually like using it 80% of the time over the Bergeon. The Bergeon blades are too 'slick' and slip easily sometimes. Just my preference. The bench plate is tempered glass with a sheet of white meat-wrapping paper underneath. No, I don't use the staking set on top of it. :)

200.jpg

This is my bigger workbench behind the clock and watch benches. Machines from left to right are an arbor press, Sherline Mill, Bergeon bushing machine and assortment of bushings behind it, and then my Sherline lathe. The red toolbox contains all the goodies for the lathe and mill. The bench is 7 foot long, behind it is my test stand for the grandfather clocks. It's also 7 foot long.

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Another view of the test stand. It's made from 1X4's and 2X4's.

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Ultrasonics and wash area. My wife hates this area, especially when I mix up a new batch of cleaner. Directly opposite this sink is our laundry area.

203.jpg

Last, but not least, my test wall for the wall clocks. Not shown are two shelving units holding other clocks and grandfather movements.

I am very thankful the Good Lord allowed me to have this shop and its tools. It has been a blessing to have it to repair the clocks that I do for a living. One thing I think we all know as guys, there are never enough tools!

The inspiration for this layout was due in part to visiting Michael Gainey's website, and I have tried to make mine as effecient as possible to minimize movement in the shop to get things done. Before I would have to crisscross and step around and over things and move from one bench to another, and even on the opposite side just to do some of my operations.
Hope this inspires you and maybe give you some ideas of what to do in your limited spaces. BTW, this used to be a front bedroom, but I took it over when the last kid moved out.

Please, those of you who haven't, post some of your pictures for us to enjoy and maybe glean ideas from your setup also. Regards.......doc
 
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David Robertson

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Really a nicely laid out work space..!!

David
 

Ansomnia

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This *is* inspirational stuff Doc! Perfect thing on a New Year's day. Thank you for posting the great photos and descriptions!!


Michael
 

Piecat

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Doc

I stand in awe! There had to be a beginning - how did you start out? Was this a gradual evolvement, or did you start off this well equipped?

Pierre
 

doc_fields

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Thanks for the comments, guys. I did start off working on an old computer desk in my bedroom, and evolved to a certain point with tools, etc. I was fortunate and got a big assistance from the Wyoming Voc. Rehab. folks after a back injury that ended my appliance career. I didn't deserve all this, but am glad for the help they gave me. If you want to see another nicely laid out shop, go to:

http://masterclockrepair.com

If anyone else wants to show their layout on this thread, please do so. We can all glean ideas from each other.........doc
 
F

FreWJensen

Wow!
Beautiful shop!
I have trouble keeping track of where my tools are!
How do you do it?
 

bchaps

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Fred...I also had a problem finding tools tools until I saw this little drawer cart at Staples. It was on sale for less than $20.00. Now all the tools I use on a repetitive basis are on or in the cart. No more getting up to look for a pliers or particular screw driver! Since I work at a table, the cart moves with me to the next work location at the other end of the table, instead of picking up everything or having tools at several locations.

As you can see in the photos, the cart was modified with some wood to hold screw drivers, wrenches and pliers and silverware trays help control the stuff inside the drawers. The pliers rack is simply a piece of plexiglass hot glued into a 1/4" grooved piece of oak. This cart has made life much more convenient!

Bill

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Kevin W.

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Hi Doc great shop.Looks very organized, that,s the way to have it.It,s good to know your injury did not slow you down too much.Also nice to see clock people do watch repair as well.
In your first picture i noticed your scanner on your bench, is it a bearcat.I have a bearcat in my workshop too, and sometimes listen to just some local action.
Have fun in your shop.
 

doc_fields

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Bill! Thanks for posting some pics of your shop! I was certainly hoping someone else would put on some pics besides mine. I like your cart idea. I've seen some nice plastic drawers and space savers at Walmart, and it has given me some ideas. Thanks for the posting--show us some more please if you get time.

Veritas, thanks for the comments. That IS a Bearscat scanner sitting there on my bench. I use it to keep track mostly for the weather in our area as Gillette (45 miles away) has a NOAA weather station there.

How do I keep track of my tools? After every repair job, before I start the next one, I clean everything up that I got out. My Dad's teachings long long ago finally sunk in. Besides, I can't stand clutter, and it is so very easy to lose a small part just on the bench! Small cuckoo clock staples, screws, taper pins, e-clips, etc., all have a way of hiding in the clutter on the bench, and besides, small parts camoflage themselves against everything else. I have a small lozenge tin can that i label "Bench Orphans". Everything I lose and re-discover later goes in there. Thanks for the replies...........doc
 
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Froby

Hi Nelson,

My wife got this simple bench and stool from Sam's Club (early Chistmas present). It is solid Maple and came with metal pegboard back, top shelf, drawers, and light for $150.00. I set it up in the corner of our computer room (now my clock room) and it works great.

I've been adding tools as I've needed them.

The most important thing I've learned so far.....

"Always Check Out the information on this forum, before you start"!!

I can't tell you how many times I run into a problem, not knowing how to proceed, only to find someone else has already asked my question and you have many answers from guys willing to share their experiences.

http://www.intergate.com/~afwflj/MyTime/My%20Shop.jpg

So far, I've done around 30 or so clocks. All of them work and keep good time.
One problem I wasn't expecting is my attachment to each of my clocks. I don't want to get rid of any of them. I just love watching them move and listening to them chime. (I'm gonna need a bigger room!!)

Frosty
 

Vic Kuring

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Some really great clock shops are posted in this string. Obviously clockwork can take up quite an amount of space, especially on a professional level.

Although my passion is not in clocks I thought you all might like to see what I work out of. My entire watch hobby space (except for the cleaning station) consists of a standard bedroom closet located in a room my wife and I both use for our cleaner hobbies.

I replaced the sliding doors with accordian style ones and installed some shelving. The work bench height is about the same as a standard watchbench. The wooden jewelers cabinet setting on the floor holds most of my handtools, project watches, some spare movements and "get back to later" projects. When I need to do lathework I just roll out my lathe bench which stores to the left of the main work area.
There is still room for expansion.

I've been working out of this space since I left the kitchen table and the set up works perfectly for me.
 

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doc_fields

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Nice shop and bench area! Neatly organized also. When I see shops like this, I like to take my time and examine everything in detail. You've got some nice drawers in there also. Lotsa nice places to store things and organize them. Thanks for sharing Vic!..................doc
 

Vic Kuring

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Thanks,Doc. One thing about working out of a closet area is that it forces neatness and organization. As the old saying goes "a place for everything and everything in its place".
 

Vic Kuring

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Nelson,

Glad to inspire. It is one of the reasons that compelled me to post a few pictures.

I certainly hope you can wrangle more than 16 square feet out of your basement. That's roughly what I am tucked into. I can't imagine that it would be enough room to do clockwork, but I don't work on clocks so I really don't know.

I'm certain as you start setting up those benches you will be able to visualize more closely just how much space you will need to be efficient and still have room for the other basement needs. I bet it will be as much fun setting your workspace up as it will be to finally have a dedicated area to clockwork in. Besides, your wife won't be giving you the side eye any longer as the dining room table will be restored!:thumb:

Vic
 
C

clockdaddy

Doc and Vic,

Unfortunately I'm not nearly as neat as y'all but I can encourage everyone to stop after each project and put things up. I CAN'T BEGIN TO TELL YOU HOW MANY HOURS I SPENT LOOKING FOR SOMETHING ON A MESSY BENCH.

When I went full time with the business, I quickly learned to straighten up as I went along. It looks more professional, saves time and one heck of a lot of frustration!

Here's a peek at my shop.

1.jpg

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1.jpg
 

doc_fields

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Thanks for sharing! It's fun to closely examine each picture of a shop and check out some of the tools that others use. Noticed the counter top set up on some drawers. My countertop came from an alley where two of them were being thrown away during a remodel. One wound up as my bench with the lathe and milling machines on it. Yes, I was a dumpster diver once, and have never quit! Its addicting.................doc
 

Sooth

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Hey doc! I just noticed something in one of the pics, and I have to ask you about it. In the photo showing the g/f clock test stand, the last movement on the end looks like it has about 12-14 hammers, and a very long pin barrel. What's the make of it, and what does it play?
 

doc_fields

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It's a Kieninger, if I remember correctly. It played Beethoven's 9th, Ave Maria, and Westminster. I had to call H. Miller to get the chime sequence right, and I'll tell you how it goes. For the 9th, it plays one strike on the first quarter, 2 strikes on the 2nd, 3 strikes on the 3rd, and this is all on the chiming, then the full melody on the top of the hour with hour strike on the striking side. Same for the other two tunes. It was a little different in it's chiming, and had me a bit confused. Thanks for asking!..................doc
 

AllThumbz

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This has been an enormously useful thread in trying to assemble a small shop in my unfinished basement. My shop has two areas, which I plan to separate by a wall when I finish the basement. The clock area is about 7x12 and the woodworking area is about the same.

I am enclosing a couple of overviews and close ups of the clock area and wood working area. The walnut table I made the top for myself, and the lathe mounting board I made by gluing up wood boards.

Hope it is helpful to someone.

LTLC
 

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shutterbug

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Here's my workshop I've been working on for most of a year off and on. Finally have it to the point I can start working again. The building sets about 50 feet or so behind the house. Workshop setup (6).JPG Workshop setup (3).JPG Workshop setup (2).JPG Workshop setup (1).JPG Workshop setup (5).JPG Workshop setup (4).JPG
 

etmb61

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My hobby/work space. I started with a 25'x15' basement room then filled it up with stuff before I could finish the walls. I end up working on the corner of the desk beside the mouse pad most of the time. There's a Sherline mill on its own table past the chair on the right.

shop.jpg

There are over 100 clocks in this space, and more on the other side of the room. Scary!

Eric
 

Dells

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My shed ( sorry workshop) I have to share with the washing machine, chest freezer, and central heating gubbins 6”6X 6”6 the bonus is it’s always warm, no windows but I changed the old wooden door for a glass upvc one so I now get a bit of natural light but not enough, I also have a wooden shed with a bench, grinder, ultrasonic tank, and small drill press.
Dell
2C7442B2-2C6F-43C1-B027-74B50E76101E.jpeg
 

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