Sherline lathe and choices.

John8

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A number of posts have been made, but for me, it has been a little hard to find the information I am seeking. I am looking to purchase a lathe, and since the Shoreline is current and has many accessories, for me, it would be fine. I would prefer a small footprint but I don't want to buy an 8 inch with a 17 inch lathe would be better for me. I know it depends upon use but in general, this is just for my small clocks and making some some parts. I am not sure that the longer bed would be needed so would like any feedback you might want to offer. Also I notice the different options and I have read that going with the lathe and C option for accessories is a good way to go? And Sherline offers two different lathes now. Thank you.
 
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Jerry Kieffer

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A number of posts have been made, but for me, it has been a little hard to find the information I am seeking. I am looking to purchase a lathe, and since the Shoreline is current and has many accessories, for me, it would be fine. I would prefer a small footprint but I don't want to buy an 8 inch with a 17 inch lathe would be better for me. I know it depends upon use but in general, this is just for my small clocks and making some some parts. I am not sure that the longer bed would be needed so would like any feedback you might want to offer. Also I notice the different options and I have read that going with the lathe and C option for accessories is a good way to go? And Sherline offers two different lathes now. Thank you.
John
Unfortunately, this is only a question you can answer yourself by hands on with each Lathe.

I can answer why I do not use the long bed Sherline lathe for Horological work, but as you mentioned, it depends on your requirements. For example, if you were doing mostly scale ship building, or pool Cues, I would suggest the long bed where it would be required.

Personally, I do Watch size work up through about the size of a English grandfather movement and similar size work on a short bed. For this size work, I have never had a need for the long bed. I should clarify, that I also do not purposely create a need for a longer bed. Another words, I use the shorter screw machine drills and appropriate size tooling for the lathe.

The Sherline Lathes are designed as machine tools and as such, all axis are controlled by calibrated leadscrews. If the calibrated leadscrews are utilized as designed, you can then utilize the maximum capabilities the lathe has to offer. Another words, accurately machine by predetermined settings. The most often used leadscrew is the carriage drive that is also the most critical in most cases. On the long bed Lathe this is a foot away from comfortable operation (unless you have 4' arms) and always out if sight of the hand wheel settings so critical for accurate work..
Again personally, to immediately glance at all hand wheel settings as well as the machining process makes machining one of those joys in life. The long bed would require unnecessary monitoring effort and a burden for Horological work.

One other note, the long bed comes with larger chucks and the short bed comes with the smaller chucks. I find the smaller chucks to be more suitable for Horological size work.

Jerry Kieffer
 

John8

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John
Unfortunately, this is only a question you can answer yourself by hands on with each Lathe.

I can answer why I do not use the long bed Sherline lathe for Horological work, but as you mentioned, it depends on your requirements. For example, if you were doing mostly scale ship building, or pool Cues, I would suggest the long bed where it would be required.

Personally, I do Watch size work up through about the size of a English grandfather movement and similar size work on a short bed. For this size work, I have never had a need for the long bed. I should clarify, that I also do not purposely create a need for a longer bed. Another words, I use the shorter screw machine drills and appropriate size tooling for the lathe.

The Sherline Lathes are designed as machine tools and as such, all axis are controlled by calibrated leadscrews. If the calibrated leadscrews are utilized as designed, you can then utilize the maximum capabilities the lathe has to offer. Another words, accurately machine by predetermined settings. The most often used leadscrew is the carriage drive that is also the most critical in most cases. On the long bed Lathe this is a foot away from comfortable operation (unless you have 4' arms) and always out if sight of the hand wheel settings so critical for accurate work..
Again personally, to immediately glance at all hand wheel settings as well as the machining process makes machining one of those joys in life. The long bed would require unnecessary monitoring effort and a burden for Horological work.

One other note, the long bed comes with larger chucks and the short bed comes with the smaller chucks. I find the smaller chucks to be more suitable for Horological size work.

Jerry Kieffer
Great, thank you!
 

John8

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Do you use a self centering or independent chuck and 3 or 4 jaw?
 

Jerry Kieffer

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Do you use a self centering or independent chuck and 3 or 4 jaw?
On the Sherline ,I use WW collets, 3 jaw and 4 jaw self centering and 4 jaw independent. While the 3-4 jaws come with hardened jaws, I also have the accessory machinable jaws for oddball items and where a high degree of accuracy is required in a 3 or 4 jaw.

Jerry Kieffer
 
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etmb61

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Hi John,

I use the long bed lathe. The working area, between the chuck to lead screw handwheel, is not as wide as my computer keyboard an mouse pad. For me It's a comfortable width. My arms are a normal length. Yes I move a bit more to look at the handwheel setting but It's never been an issue for me.

I don't always need the extra length of the bed, but I have needed it. Just not for clock work. All the clock work I've done has been close to the headstock.

Three jaw self centering, four jaw independent, and WW collets.

I have the "C" option and I've used every bit of it.

I also have a T-rest and gravers.

Eric
 

Snapper

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I also use the long bed Sherline. If you intend to use the lathe purely for clocks then the short bed would probably be all you need. However, and it is a big "however", I would wager that you will use it for more than clock once you have had it a while and you may then wish you had purched the long bed.

As Eric said above, I have no issues with the lead screw dial being slightly further away, and it is near enough for me to be easily capable of turning it whilst closely monitoring the cut. Before I bought mine, this was apotential sticking point as I had been brought up using larger lathes with the long axis feed being mounted on the saddle and I was apprehensive as to how I would get on with the Sherline system. However within a couple of days I no longer groped about for the non-existant wheel.
 

John8

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Are you guys using the Sherline in metric or standard? I am used to both and like metric as it makes more since but I wonder in working with the lathe, which would work out better with clocks.
 

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Are you guys using the Sherline in metric or standard? I am used to both and like metric as it makes more since but I wonder in working with the lathe, which would work out better with clocks.
John,

FWIW, My Sherline is a short bed with inch calibrated hand wheels. I love it, and using suitable tooling as Jerry mentions in post #2 I find the bed length ideal. As far as self centering chucks, I use both the 3-jaw and the 4-jaw depending on the material I'm working with. On round stock I always use the 4-jaw as it does distribute clamping forces better than the 3-jaw. I also find the independent 4-jaw chuck very useful.

Bill
 

MARK A. BUTTERWORTH

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There are a couple of thoughts to be considered. If this lathe is going to be moved about, then definitely the short bed is the way to go. I had a Unimat and never needed a long bed. However, when I got the Sherline, I got the long bad as I had a dedicated space for it and I just don’t like feeling cramped. By the time one puts a steady rest, cross slide, and tail stock on the rail, there is not much room left, but it is more a psychological issue than practical one. In terms of cost, because of the upgrades one gets with the long bed, the cost is about the same.
 
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bruce linde

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I am a total lightweight compared to the other posters, but I have the short bed and feel like I can make it work but it would sometimes be nice to have the longer one.
 
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Snapper

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I have the metric version. Whilst I was brought up with inches, claculation is so much easier in metric and over the years have become confortable with both.
 
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ChuckR

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John8
I have the Sherline 8 inch, I too do mostly clock work with it. If I had to do over again I would my the 17 bed as some projects I wanted to do were bigger then the 8 inch bed would allow. The bigger bed will not hamper you clock work in any way. All the accessories I have are bought from Sherline as I know they will fit and I won't have a problem with them and I also went with the Inch dials and am very happy with them. Hope this helps.
ChuckR
 

Jerry Kieffer

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Are you guys using the Sherline in metric or standard? I am used to both and like metric as it makes more since but I wonder in working with the lathe, which would work out better with clocks.
John
Its a personal preference thing.

What ever your first preference is when measuring, I would suggest keeping everything consistent.

Jerry Kieffer
 

Rick Hufnagel

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This is a great thread, thank you all for responding with your experience. I've wanted to purchase a lathe for a while. practicality & function are key, and after reading oodles of threads from everyone over the past year or so Sherline seems to be the way to go. They just do it all.
 

Wayne A

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With the help of this thread I broke out of the many months long "analysis paralysis" loop and made an order with Shurline. No more crazy workarounds with stone knives and bearskins.
 
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JeffG

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I'm also considering purchasing a lathe and am zeroing in on the Sherline.
I intend to start using it to polish pivots rather than using my primitive Dremel tool set up that I made. Will the 3-jaw chuck work for pivot polishing, or are collets necessary?
 

bruce linde

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you'll want collets whenever possible... but will use both... and other methods for holding pieces, as well
 
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etmb61

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I'm also considering purchasing a lathe and am zeroing in on the Sherline.
I intend to start using it to polish pivots rather than using my primitive Dremel tool set up that I made. Will the 3-jaw chuck work for pivot polishing, or are collets necessary?
Collets are safer for working up close. Spinning chucks tend to bite you.

Eric
 

Rob Martinez

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Warning -- Just my very new-bee opinion! .......Before you buy directly from Sherline take a look at Timesavers, Butterworth (best - and I think they still gift you some collets on the house!) and Meritts. All are less expensive than the Sherline page and you get the same service/support. Items ship directly from Sherline. As I recall Timesavers will assemble for you. If you check the prices you will see that the stuff you get with the C package over the B package (yes, you can get both through the above parts houses) isn't that much of a savings and since you are 90% clock orientated at this point you wont be using them anyway.... Using the cross feed also requires risers for the head, tale and tool so you cant just put it on immediately.... also, since you can turn the head with the loosening of 1 Allen screw the value of the cross feed is debatable..... I am very Very VERY new to my lathe (only made "shavings" so far) but I went through this decision process very recently and lucked out by discovering the above. I went with the B package and 17" -- Sherline has a good narrative on why inches or metric.... definitely check over their page, videos, written narratives.....heck, even the owners/operators/install manual is free on line..... check it all out and you will be glad you did..... Oh, and the little machine shop.com is a good place for first projects, etc.... Another nice source for infor.....
 
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MuensterMann

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I have a collection of mostly Peerless collets, but with some other brands scattered about. Will Peerless collets be used on the Sherline products?
 

wefalck

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You will have to have the WW-collet adapter and matching draw-tube, I suppose. Don't know off-the-cuff, whether the thread in the Sherline draw-tube will fit Peerless collets.
 

MuensterMann

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I didn't find Peerless on a list that I saw on this topic, so just wondering was is needed to use with Sherline.
 

MuensterMann

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I am planning to buy a Sherline lathe, perhaps option B or C. Other than the lathe and items in the options, what else do I need to add to my shopping list? All lathes come with a drawbar for the head-stock??

I see they have 8mm collet adapters, but also they have a WW (.312-313) and 8mm (.314-.315) collet adapter and drawbar? Do I need the adapter and drawbar? Do I need WW or 8mm?

Sorry, I am not a machinist, but just a humble clock repair guy learning more skills.
 

Jerry Kieffer

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I am planning to buy a Sherline lathe, perhaps option B or C. Other than the lathe and items in the options, what else do I need to add to my shopping list? All lathes come with a drawbar for the head-stock??

I see they have 8mm collet adapters, but also they have a WW (.312-313) and 8mm (.314-.315) collet adapter and drawbar? Do I need the adapter and drawbar? Do I need WW or 8mm?

Sorry, I am not a machinist, but just a humble clock repair guy learning more skills.
We each take a little different approach to machining depending on what works with our god given thought process.

For that reason, I would suggest the 5400 short bed "A" package lathe for horological work.

In addition, I would suggest the following.

(1) additional double sided 1/4" tool post.

(1) Rear mounted cutoff tool

(1) 8mm collet adaptor and drawbar.

(1) tailstock Drill chuck alignment adaptor.

(1) three piece brazed carbide lathe tool set PN 3006

At this point read the instruction setup guide at least twice and properly adjust the lathe per instructions.

Next, practice on the lathe with metal designed to be machined until you master the basics. I would suggest that you practice on brass or 12L14 steel from a reputable supply house.

Once the basics are mastered, you will now what accessories will work for you as an individual.

Jerry Kieffer
 

Rob Martinez

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Besides what package to buy you have options of "how" to buy. Each of the major supply houses (Merritts, TimeSavers and Butterworths) offer discounts worth using and you still get the same warranty/service from Sherline. Actually, it ships directly from Sherline. I found that Butterworth's was the best IMO. I believe they still give a set of collets when you purchase from them. Looking at the differences in the B and C packages the cross slide seems to be the biggest difference. Since you can move the headstock I personally didnt see a need for the cross slide but thats just me and since I'm a very green new-bee others can better comment on this than I can.
 

MuensterMann

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Thanks Jerry! I assume your 5400 is a typo and you meant 4500. If the 4500, as opposed to 4000, then you are suggesting that zero adjustable wheels is the way to go. Yes? Of your 5 items, thanks for the one PN. I am looking for what the other PNs may be and not having much luck. However, the8mm collet adapter/drawbar is PN 1163.

I will also be getting the 5400 mill to satisfy at least my new method of doing bushings (I already have the pins). It was suggested to go with the 15 inch column option and will be getting the plate holder accessory PN 2118. What else do I need here as your recommendation? Option A? Much appreciated!!
 

bruce linde

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i went with what jerry suggests, and love it. i also just purchased (and received this morning) a vertical mill attachment for the lathe rather than a stand-alone milling machine. i want to be able to do occasional milling stuff, but am not really cutting gears or doing anything regular... YMMV.
 

Jerry Kieffer

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Thanks Jerry! I assume your 5400 is a typo and you meant 4500. If the 4500, as opposed to 4000, then you are suggesting that zero adjustable wheels is the way to go. Yes? Of your 5 items, thanks for the one PN. I am looking for what the other PNs may be and not having much luck. However, the8mm collet adapter/drawbar is PN 1163.

I will also be getting the 5400 mill to satisfy at least my new method of doing bushings (I already have the pins). It was suggested to go with the 15 inch column option and will be getting the plate holder accessory PN 2118. What else do I need here as your recommendation? Option A? Much appreciated!!
Yes I did mean the 4500. sorry about that.

Tool post PN 3003

Rear cut off tool PN 3018

8mm collet adaptor/drawbar PN 1163

Drill chuck alignment PN 1202

For Horological applications I have never found a need for a 15" column.

In addition to above I would suggest a Mill vise to hold things PN 3551 and the three mill collets to hold endmills PN-3060.

Again, make chips and accessories will make themselves known.

Jerry Kieffer
 

MuensterMann

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Great information! I see the mill collets come in either English or metric. End mills are sized to be held by the English-sized collets? As for bushing, pins of various sizes are used. If collets were used, you would need quite the collection and there would be constant changing between pin collet and one to holder the reamer (KWM in my case). Is the 1/4 inch drill chuck accurate enough for bushing work?

EDIT: Hold off on the second question, I just re-read the Sherline instructions for using the 2118. It answers my question: yes, use the drill chuck for bushing purposes - unless high precision (watches) is needed. I don't do watch repair.
 
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wefalck

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End-mill come in either metric or imperial dimensions. Supply depends on where you are. I gather.
 

Jerry Kieffer

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Great information! I see the mill collets come in either English or metric. End mills are sized to be held by the English-sized collets? As for bushing, pins of various sizes are used. If collets were used, you would need quite the collection and there would be constant changing between pin collet and one to holder the reamer (KWM in my case). Is the 1/4 inch drill chuck accurate enough for bushing work?

EDIT: Hold off on the second question, I just re-read the Sherline instructions for using the 2118. It answers my question: yes, use the drill chuck for bushing purposes - unless high precision (watches) is needed. I don't do watch repair.
I suggested the Mill vise and endmill holding collets for the Million other things you will do besides bushing that require a vise and a method of holding endmills.

Jerry Kieffer
 

MuensterMann

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I looked at few tool sites for end mills. They have both imperial and metric sizes. However, here in the USA there were many more imperial options than metric ones. So, it seems imperial is the better option. There is a Sherline 5400 option A, with comes with 3 end mill collets. I wonder if you order a Sherline 5410, the metric version, if you get the imperial or metric end mill collets. Hmmm.
 

Jerry Kieffer

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I looked at few tool sites for end mills. They have both imperial and metric sizes. However, here in the USA there were many more imperial options than metric ones. So, it seems imperial is the better option. There is a Sherline 5400 option A, with comes with 3 end mill collets. I wonder if you order a Sherline 5410, the metric version, if you get the imperial or metric end mill collets. Hmmm.
The most informed source of information on Sherline tools and accessories will be Sherline themselves. Just call and ask.

Jerry Kieffer
 

MuensterMann

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I very much appreciate all the help in getting off to a good start with my Sherline adventure!

After reading the method again to bush using a mill, it seems the most convenient way is to ream from the inside and then put in the bushing as the next step (also from inside) so one can use the drill mechanism to hammer the bushing into the plate. Normally I ream from the outside, then flip to put the bushing into the inside portion of the plate.
 

MuensterMann

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When using the mill for bushings, is it common to ream from the inside of the plate (as well as insert bushing from inside)?
 

Jerry Kieffer

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When using the mill for bushings, is it common to ream from the inside of the plate (as well as insert bushing from inside)?
When reaming with a milling machine, the bushing holes will be straight ,round and and proper friction fit if properly setup and tooled. It makes no difference if inserted or reamed from the front or inside.

The only reason to ream and insert from the inside, would be the quality of the bushing hole to prevent the bushing from coming out the front and cause movement damage.

Jerry Kieffer
 

MuensterMann

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Thanks Jerry for all your advice! As for reaming from the inside, it is doable, as sometimes I must depending on where a post is located. The only downside is that the outside is usually where one marks up the patient for surgery!

BTW, for all those who may be interested, the 5400 mill (inch) with Option A comes with inch collets. The 5410 mill (metric) with Option A comes with metric collets. This is the default. However, you can ask when purchasing for the opposite set. No problem.

As for 15" extended column, it may not be needed too often, but it was suggested in another post that it may be need for grandfather movements with long posts.

The 17-inch bed lathe seems to be a good choice for beyond clock repair usage and perhaps resell as well. However, the 8 inch bed lathe should be quite adequate for the clock work. I do prefer to have the 3.1 inch chuck as opposed to the 2.5 inch one to be able to hold large barrels.
 

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