Seth Thomas Tall case clock

vikkip

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Jan 24, 2010
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Re: Post your Seth Thomas clocks here.

Hi, I'm new here, and would like more info about my clock if anyone can help. Dial is wood, hand painted, and says S. Thomas Plymouth. It's a tall case clock, 30 hour wood movement, brass bell, with calendar and second hand. Pendulum is iron, weights are lead filled brass cans. The case is quite simple, spare of ornamentation, but it looks right at home in my old house.
 

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harold bain

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Vikkip, I copied your posts to a new thread, as your posts in the Seth Thomas thread were in danger of being lost. This may help you get some response. Very nice early American clock.:D
 

harold bain

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vikkip, about all I can find for you in Tran Duy Ly's Seth Thomas book is that Seth Thomas started making clock movements like this in 1813, when he bought land and a factory from Heman Clarke, near Eli Terry's new plant at Plymouth Hollow. Clarke had been making these movements, and Thomas continued. He continued making these movements for at least the next 10 years and built up a considerable fortune. It is noted that Seth Thomas never made cases for these movements. In the 1810's and 1820's the movements were sold to pedlars who in turn sold them to the final customer or possibly an intermediate. In either instance, the mass produced movements were removed from Plymouth Hollow without cases. It is rare to find two clock cases for a Seth Thomas wooden movement tall clock that are nearly identical.
From this I would guess that the movements and dials came from Seth Thomas for casing elsewhere.
 

vikkip

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Jan 24, 2010
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Thank you. Our house was built in 1822, and it's a perfect fit for style and scale.

Now, is there someone out here who could give old Seth some much needed TLC? He's lost a few teeth, his crutch wire loop has cracked at the bend (it was soldered when I bought him, and cracked again). The inside of the door is marked HB PA 1887 but there are no other tags or marks.

It's not a museum piece, but it's a much loved old clock. He ran until a tooth that regulates the winder broke, the weight hit the floor, and he is now retired from duty until he's back in shape.
 

harold bain

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A perfect clock for the age of your home. If you let us know where you are, I'm sure we could find you a repairman.
 

Steven Thornberry

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I'm in the Metro Detroit area, and if there is someone in reasonable driving distance that would be ideal, but I could pack the movement carefully for shipping if necessary.

While browsing the web tonight, I came across this excerpt from a 1915 book. The Eli Terry movement shown looks to my untrained eye to be if not the same, very similar.

http://www.monkey-feathers.com/Monk...icanCraftsmen/EarlyAmericanCraftsmenCh05.html
Whether a Terry movement or not, the wood works makes it about as early as your house. Not easy to find, these 30-hour wood work longcases. I've seen one other, but so long ago I have forgotten what it looked like.