Seth Thomas "Stanley" Adamantine Clock Date?

Discussion in 'Your Newest Clock Acquisition' started by jfran395, Nov 4, 2017.

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  1. jfran395

    jfran395 Registered User

    Oct 29, 2017
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    I'm fairly new to the clock collecting community, and happy to have found such a great group as this one!

    My latest purchase is a Seth Thomas adamantine clock, and I'm interested in knowing approximately when it was made. I've done some work on the case to bring it back. The movement had very little wear on it - one pivot that could probably use a bushing, but otherwise fairly clean. At this point, I just oiled it and put it back in service. (I bought a similar movement on eBay to practice on before I attempt to take this one apart) The pendulum bob appears to be just lead, with no plating or marks at all. No idea if it's original. I can find no numbers or letters on the case, only on the paper label, which is in pretty poor condition. Also, I have two questions on the case - I repainted the pinstriping on the front in white. Is that correct? I wanted to save as much of the flaking label as possible, so I put a coat of Modge over it, which seemed to do the trick. Is that an acceptable practice? DSCF9217.JPG DSCF9220.JPG DSCF9224.JPG DSCF9225.JPG DSCF9229.JPG Thanks for any help you can give me!
     
  2. JTD

    JTD Registered User

    Sep 27, 2005
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    Welcome to the board.

    You've done a beautiful job restoring your clock. The pinstriping was probably gold originally, but there is nothing to stop you re-doing it in gold if you feel like it - you obviously have a steady hand and a good eye.

    I can't tell you the exact date, but someone with the right volume of Tran's book will be along shortly, I'm sure, and will be able to tell you.

    As for the label, there are all sorts of opinions as to the best way to conserve them and what to use. I had to look to see what Modge is, but it seems to be suitable, though I've never heard of it being used for this before.

    Great job - well done! Just a word of warning - clock collecting is highly addictive and clocks have a habit of multiplying!!

    JTD
     
  3. gleber

    gleber Registered User

    Jun 15, 2015
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    Can I ask how you did the incising? It looks fantastic. Did you try to follow the lines, or just cover the area and wipe off the excess on the surface face? If you followed the lines, what type of brush or pen did you use?

    A lot of ST clocks have the date code stenciled on the case like the way they stenciled Stanley on yours. Any sign of that? This is one on one of my clocks, indicating Aug, 1888 (G = 8, or August).
    http://www.myclocks.site/users/gleber//seth_thomas_800_mantle/images/20160119_201315.jpg

    Thanks,
    Tom
     
  4. jfran395

    jfran395 Registered User

    Oct 29, 2017
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    Thanks, Tom - I thought it came out pretty well, too. When you paint a car, you wet sand a small part, then take a relatively hard squeegee and go over what you've sanded. If there's any "orange peel," the squeegee will show it. I got one of those hard squeegees at an auto parts store, and painted inside the embossed lines with a small brush and water-based paint, a small portion at a time. I'd paint an inch or so of it, then squeegee over the surface to remove the excess paint, and keep a damp rag handy to clean off what the squeegee didn't get. I used water-based latex paint, so cleaning it off the smooth surface wasn't an issue at all. Oh - I also took a small knife and scraped inside the lines before I started to remove any old wax or dirt that would keep the paint from sticking.

    Unfortunately, I can't find any numbers or letters anywhere on my clock's case. Either they didn't do it, or the lettering faded off over time (unlikely, since yours is still clear after nearly 120 years!)

    Thanks for the reply!
    John
     
  5. Rockin Ronnie

    Rockin Ronnie Registered User
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    Nov 18, 2012
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    have an Adamantine as well and like the incising you have done. Makes a huge difference.
    Ron
     
  6. ehunter78

    ehunter78 Registered User

    Jul 3, 2016
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    I have this same clock! It was actually one of the first that I purchased. It's one of my favorites, but I never noticed that it said "Stanley" on the bottom! Mine has the original pinstriping which I uncovered when I cleaned off a couple layers of shellac that had turned the case green. It's gold. I am hoping to locate a lesser quality adamantine clock to experiment with. I've used headlight cleaner on discolored plastic and old phone parts, and it brings life back to the faded color/clarity of the surfaces. I'm thinking that it might possibly have a similar effect on the Adamantine, surface though I haven't tried it!

    IMG_3409.JPG
     
  7. jfran395

    jfran395 Registered User

    Oct 29, 2017
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    Your clock is beautiful, ehunter! Thanks for the info on the pinstriping. FYI, headlight restoring paste is just what I used on my clock, and it worked great to remove stains and blemishes, and generally bring back a shine. I followed up with car wax after.
     
  8. ehunter78

    ehunter78 Registered User

    Jul 3, 2016
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    Thanks John! It was one of my first clock projects. Someone had painted all the metal and the face, and had varnished the case. I was able to strip the paint from the metal without removing the gilding. The case, I cleaned with rubbing alcohol until the varnish (or more likely shellac) melted off. I was thrilled to find so much of the pinstriping intact! The painter had even painted over the paper face which I slowly picked off with a tiny screwdriver! What a mess!

    I got brave with a project clock last night. It's an earlier Adamantine that was filthy and quite dull. I got out the 3M Headlight restorer, and it did amazing things! The black areas still have some fading, but it brought out the shine and color of the celluloid (which has sadly faded from a brilliant emerald green to orange). Still quite attractive in its current color scheme, but that green sure was stunning. I attached a photo of the green Adamantine behind one of the feet as well as one of the final product. A few hours of chemical inhalation and elbow grease pay off again!

    Ed

    24294039_10215162635125248_6580612473951532374_n.jpg 24301257_10215165319352352_278742871171717326_n.jpg
     

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