Seth Thomas Electric Hybrids

Discussion in 'Electric Horology' started by bangster, Feb 5, 2020.

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  1. bangster

    bangster Moderator
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    Can you tell me the dates during which these Seth Thomas electric hybrids were made? There seem to be several models. The only ones I've seen previously were model (1), but I've just come across this model (2).

    They appear to be both based on the ST 124, but there are interesting diffferences.
    In (1) the motor is mounted on the inside of the back plate with three screws. In (2) it's mounted on the outside of the front plate. The gearing connection of the two to the inside gear train is different. In (1) the power leads from the motor connect to the power cord with twist splices and wire nuts. In (2) the power leads go to a connection block with screws attached to the bottom of the back plate. The ends of the power cord are equipped with crimped on Y-connectors to go on the connection block screws.

    (1) has conventional fan speed regulators. (2) has copper-colored fly wheels with tension springs. In (1) the lower front plate is plated brass. In (2) that plate is brass-colored brass.

    I'd appreciate anything you can tell me about these ST hybrids: when made, how many different models, etc.

    Thanks in advance

    STE front view.rot copy.jpg Bennett ST hybrid front. copy.jpg Bennett Hybrid back.jpg ST hybrid power hookup.jpg
     
  2. bangster

    bangster Moderator
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    Ok then, I'll move it to Electric Horologyl
     
  3. bangster

    bangster Moderator
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    Hey, somebody oughta know SOMETHING about these danged things. Are they really that obscure?
     
  4. Kevin W.

    Kevin W. Registered User
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    I have a very similar movement. It looks like yours. Seen them before but i dont have much knowledge about them.
     
  5. Karl Thies

    Karl Thies Registered User
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    #5 Karl Thies, Feb 8, 2020
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2020
    Picture #1 shows a movement which I have in a ST Medbury 5e chiming clock which was produced in the 1950's. #2 was also a ST Medbury, but either 2e or 3e, and was produced in the 1940's, the motor on this one was a nice Sangamo motor which was built to last. The speed of the chime was changed on this movement by putting the "fan" in and out of the magnetic field around the wheel. Great clocks both, but because they ran so well, they usually required extreme measures to restore them to working condition. They had been known to run until the pinions and bushing completely failed. Care of the fiber wheel is not to let it soak in cleaning solution, dip and clean with a brush. The fiber wheel will not take kindly to letting it soak in solution.
     
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  6. bangster

    bangster Moderator
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    Thank you friends, for that information. So the model with the "wheel" fans is earlier than the one with the fan fans. The steel things hovering
    over the wheels; are they magnetized? Are the wheels magnetized? How did that work?
     
  7. Karl Thies

    Karl Thies Registered User
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    100_1161.JPG 100_1162.JPG

    The oval bar is the magnet, and if you look at the plate you can see that by loosening the top screw you can swivel the oval steel to go further into the wheel and make it slower or further away making it faster. Interesting innovation that I had not seen before in any electric chiming clock.
     
  8. Karl Thies

    Karl Thies Registered User
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    100_1163.JPG 100_1164.JPG

    Picture on the left is the slowest setting, and the picture on the right is the fastest setting.
     
  9. bangster

    bangster Moderator
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    Dang clever, these natives!
     
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