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Seth Thomas Electric Clock

Gary 54

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Jun 27, 2017
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This old clock was in with a box of junk I picked up at an auction for $2. It is just under 7 inches tall and has a wood case. There is a paper label that says "Whittier" which must be the model. It has the starter knob and a hand set knob on the back. The little dog on the front of the clock I think is an old cracker jack prize from the 40's that someone glued on. I can not find this model listed anywhere and was wondering if anyone had seen one? I was also wondering what type of electric cord would be appropriate? I would like to get a period correct cord and see if the clock works. I am guessing it would be a cloth covered cord. What would you guess on age, maybe 1930's? Thanks for any information 308893.jpg 308894.jpg
 

JTD

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Sep 27, 2005
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Welcome to the board.

Your enquiry might do better if it were posted in the Electric Horology section. Perhaps one of the moderators can move it for you.

JTD
 

BLKBEARD

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Nov 15, 2016
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I would just put any lamp cord on it temporarily till you establish that it runs or can be made to run. Then you can swap it out for a more appropriate cord.
 

Movementman

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Oct 30, 2012
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These are not that common, but I have seen one other like yours with a sticker saying "Electric #1". I have an ST "Buffet" Wall clock with the same movement in it. Mine needed some oil, the poles in the motor adjusted, and a new cord. I made a video on YouTube of it in Feb. 2016 when I first got it and it has a white lamp cord on it, but shortly after that video was uploaded I put a period correct fabric covered cord and an old style plug on it. Replacing the cord is easy, because the wires go to two terminals inside, and they are screwed into it. Removing what ever is left of the old cord will be easy, because all you need to do is losen the screws, remove the old cord, place the ends of the new cord in (Obviously already stripped), tighten the screws until they are snug. Make sure to make some sort of strain relief too, a knot in the cord usually works. Also, I recommend putting some light grease on the teeth of the large fiber wheel, it will improve the life of the movement and make is quieter.