Seth Thomas Dumpster Dive

jbgrant

Registered User
Oct 10, 2015
99
2
8
Burlington, KY
Country
Region
I found this two column Seth Thomas with a No. 11 movement in the dumpster in our condo complex. I was astounded to find the entire case, movement, pendulum rod with suspension spring, pendulum bob, weights, and even the winding key. I could not find the dial/face. The hands were on the movement and they may not be appropriate for this clock.

I found a similar clock in a post by kingrus dated July 7, 2009 with some information about his clock. On this clock the movement is stamped "Plymouth Conn USA". What's left of the label on the back board says "Thomaston Conn".

Any information you may have that you can share here would be wonderful.

P1040666.jpg P1040667.jpg P1040668.jpg P1040669.jpg P1040671.jpg P1040672.jpg P1040673.jpg P1040674.jpg P1040675.jpg P1040677.jpg
 

heifetz17

NAWCC Member
Apr 8, 2015
256
55
28
Country
Region
What an incredible find! I'm quite surprised the tablet stayed intact, although I can't tell from the photos if the glass is also intact that covers the dial. You're right that the hands are not correct for the clock.

I have two of these and they're lovely. It's most likely somewhere in the neighborhood of 1865-1870 since it has both Plymouth Hollow and Thomaston.
 

jbgrant

Registered User
Oct 10, 2015
99
2
8
Burlington, KY
Country
Region
Thanks for the info. I believe the tablet is not original as there is a piece of glass with a print mounted on cardboard tacked in. I think the dial glass is old (wavy, bubbles) but not sure if it is original. It is now reassembled, so I will post some pictures soon.

JB
 

jbgrant

Registered User
Oct 10, 2015
99
2
8
Burlington, KY
Country
Region
I reassembled the case, but have not dismantled the movement for cleaning. When I find issues there I will ask in the Clock repair forum. Here are a few pictures of the clock as it is now.

I do have some questions about the dial such as how does it attach to the movement support boards. There seem to be four (or three in my case) angled pieces of metal along the corners of the supports, but I am unclear if that is how the dial mounts.

If this in inappropriate for this board I can ask the question over at case restoration.

Thanks for the help.

P1040678.JPG P1040679.JPG P1040678.JPG P1040681.JPG P1040682.JPG P1040683.JPG
 
  • Like
Reactions: PatH

jmclaugh

Registered User
Jun 1, 2006
5,370
252
83
Devon
Country
Region
That's one lucky clock and one that is worth saving and bringing back to life. The ladies look mid Victorian.
 

Andy Dervan

Gibbs Literary Award
NAWCC Star Fellow
NAWCC Member
Oct 23, 2002
2,865
114
63
Country
Region
Hi JB,

A nice find...

I found the clock in 1st Edition of Seth Thomas Clocks & Movements by Tran Duy Ly - illustrated on page 272.
It was probably introduced in 1863.

The original dial was metal with opening at center to show of the brass movement.. It has a stenciled lower tablet glass.

I will try and scan in the page, but it might not come out that well.

Andy Dervan

ST shelf clock.jpg
 

PatH

NAWCC Fellow
NAWCC Member
Dec 5, 2014
2,227
1,678
113
Texas
Country
Region
I do have some questions about the dial such as how does it attach to the movement support boards. There seem to be four (or three in my case) angled pieces of metal along the corners of the supports, but I am unclear if that is how the dial mounts.
jbgrant, Do you have the original dial? Sometimes there are bent metal pieces that can be turned to hold the dial in place - two on the bottom turned up to support the bottom of the dial and two at the top turn down to hold it in place. I'm not sure what was originally used on this clock.
 

jbgrant

Registered User
Oct 10, 2015
99
2
8
Burlington, KY
Country
Region
jbgrant, Do you have the original dial?
No, I do not have the original dial. The hands were on the movement but in all honesty finding the weights, pendulum rod, bob, and such I may have overlooked the dial. That dumpster was dumped long ago, so no going back to look for it. If someone can take a clear pic of the dial without the hands, plus the back to show how it mounts, it would be a huge blessing to me.
 

jbgrant

Registered User
Oct 10, 2015
99
2
8
Burlington, KY
Country
Region
Hi JB,

A nice find...

I found the clock in 1st Edition of Seth Thomas Clocks & Movements by Tran Duy Ly - illustrated on page 272.
It was probably introduced in 1863.
]
Thanks Andy for the information and picture. I still need to tear down and clean the movement. Didn't realize it was a one day clock!

JB
 

heifetz17

NAWCC Member
Apr 8, 2015
256
55
28
Country
Region
Hopefully these pictures help. Yes you’re correct that those little metal elbows hold the dial in place.

D6425F99-208A-4A05-B140-B2FF19C8A9BB.jpeg 8F4201D4-D6E2-4C72-8400-1B1B1D78E742.jpeg 1FFAD920-D2E3-43CA-98AC-5CA0E506DFE1.jpeg
 

jbgrant

Registered User
Oct 10, 2015
99
2
8
Burlington, KY
Country
Region
Sorry for the late reply, but we were camping down at Big Bone Lick State Park in Kentucky. It is 20 minutes from home and we just picked up a new camper.

The pictures are great, just what I needed to see. Thanks.

JB
 

Forum statistics

Threads
167,083
Messages
1,455,999
Members
87,295
Latest member
tmo309
Encyclopedia Pages
1,057
Total wiki contributions
2,914
Last edit
E. Howard & Co. by Clint Geller