Seth Thomas case repair

Discussion in 'Clock Case Construction, Repair & Restoration' started by Salsagev, May 3, 2020.

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  1. Salsagev

    Salsagev Registered User

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    I have another thread for clock repair but for this, I will be focusing on the case. The case is in bad condition. Nails are loose and screw holes have widened. Veneer is cracked as the boards are too. iHow should I start the restoration. I will do what’s necessary to fix the case up. Thanks.

    883C813C-ECD1-49FE-8A80-5C3EB332E148.jpeg 91719338-4A54-44B4-B35C-568008F5D8EA.jpeg 87418D3C-C368-4C5A-BE74-C5281D964B93.jpeg 7FDEAD9E-E26A-462C-8183-A672B93971E9.jpeg F4A30F15-2673-40F9-90D9-725E28A6AB6C.jpeg 2856690B-847D-416B-A700-A6B59D37B58F.jpeg 137449D3-A100-428B-A8C4-A13056DE9BFF.jpeg F304FAA2-602F-4F2C-87F2-CB16258ED212.jpeg E23A3570-BA9D-420A-A7FE-A1F845370D61.jpeg 1F620121-615D-445A-96D9-FB614A3A392E.jpeg DDBC9DB8-AA26-4127-87BC-6FE78783E285.jpeg 83274054-B4ED-4BCB-8D92-12E675984AA4.jpeg 05EFE497-498E-4AB6-A5E1-5B184BC684D9.jpeg
     
  2. Kevin W.

    Kevin W. Registered User
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    You were given some good advice in the other thread about restoring the case. It will be a nice clock once restored.
     
  3. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
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    Your Seth Thomas Sucile is one of their "Adamantine" Veneered Mantel Clocks.

    Adamantine is a celluloid veneer which is glued/bonded to soft wood. It was produced in such a way as to simulate Hard Woods, like Mahogany or Marble, Onyx (of several types), solid Black or White finishes to name a few. It was actually a knock-off of much more expensive European Clocks. When cared for, it ages very well.

    The first thing to be careful about is the fact that those celluloid columns can be very fragile. Treat them that way and look for cracks.

    If the clock has been exposed to a lot of sunlight, these columns can become brittle. I restored one recently which required repair and reinforcement of these columns with wood dowel inserts and casting resin:

    Column Restoration.JPG

    Remove them first. Usually you can remove the nails which hold the capital and bases in place with a small pair of needle-nosed pliers. If you can't get them with your pliers, carefully get a dull knife under the head of the nails. Once they have been pried up enough, use a pair of needle-nosed pliers to pull them out of the case. You should be able to work the celluloid column free with either the base or capital removed but don't force anything. You may need to remove both before the columns can slide out. Take your time and remove all four of the full columns out, setting aside all of the fasteners and hardware. At this point, it's really not necessary to put the columns back in the exact same locations they came out of, but it certainly doesn't hurt to keep track of little details like that now. It will help you with disassembly later.

    Once the Column Capitals are removed, I believe that you'll find fasteners which hold the case top in place. Here's a photo of the partially disassembled case. You can see how much the color has faded from over exposure to sunlight. Keep your clock out of direct sunlight.

    ColumnCloseups.jpg
    Case Disassembled.JPG

    Remove the feet and dial.

    I don't recall the exact locations of all of the fasteners, but once you get the columns, feet, and Sound Board (Thin board that the Gong fastens to) removed, you'll see all of the Wood Screw Fasteners which need to be taken out. Your case looks like it fits together very loosely, with some split and broken parts. Carefully disassemble and label the parts with some masking tape.

    You'll need to glue up some of the split boards and some of the wood screw holes may be stripped and will need to be partially filled. I like to use a good "putty" made with a good quality wood glue and hard wood saw dust. I'll partly fill the stripped screw holes and push the putty down into the holes with the Fastener that came out of it. This pushes the putty deeply into the hole and forms a good "starting hole" position for the screw when it's time to reassemble the case.

    When working with antique clocks, in many if not most cases, it's really a good idea to use Hide Glue. In the case of your broken parts, others may disagree but I really think that I would clamp them up with some good epoxy. The breaks are not wood joints, and you don't want them to come apart again. The problem with glued wood joints is that wood expands and contacts with atmospheric conditions. Hide Glue is strong and joints glued with it can be more easily re-glued if the joint fails due to swelling and shrinking of the wood. If modern wood glue or epoxy joints fail, you have a problem because wood has to be removed in order to re-glue the joint.

    See this tutorial to learn more: Hide Glue 101 I don't think you'd go wrong with Hide Glue. In the long run, it might even prove to be the best choice. With our climate controlled living spaces and Adamantine Veneer, I just think I'd go with Epoxy. It's a judgement call. If you have wood-working experience, go with what you know.

    Cleaning Adamantine should be done with something non-abrasive. Waterless hand cleaners like "Goop" or "GoJo" (No punice!) do an excellent job. Keep apply with clean, soft rags until the rags fail to pick up any more dirt. Then re-evaluate the finish. If it is still dull or rough looking, you can use some automotive polishing paste on it.. Apply with clean soft cloth and be careful not to pull any of the Adamantine Veneer off of the wood. Once the Adamantine is smooth, you can apply a good automotive paste wax to it. You can clean up your metal parts in your ultrasonic cleaner. Sometimes it helps to buff them lightly with 4-0 steel wool. 4-0 Steel Wool also works well on the Bezel. Once you have them the way you want them, wax them up as well. You may even want to seal them with spray lacquer.

    There are a lot of different cleaning, polishing and waxing products that have been recommended through the years. Just remember that you're working with plastic and choose accordingly.

    Here's another reference that you may find helpful: Adamantine Finish Care and Protection

    Once you have the case completely disassembled, repaired, cleaned and waxed, you should end up with something like this.

    Disassembled Case.jpg

    Let us know if you get stuck or have any questions.

    Bruce
     
  4. Salsagev

    Salsagev Registered User

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    Thanks for the detailed instructions. I will get started as soon as possible. How would i get the adamantine “unshrunk” because it’s a large crack In the center.
     
  5. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
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    #5 Bruce Alexander, May 5, 2020
    Last edited: May 5, 2020
    The Adamantine Veneer is very thin. Take a closer look at the split.
    I think that you'll find that the underlying wood has cracked.
    05efe497-498e-4ab6-a5e1-5b184bc684d9-jpeg.jpg

    As far as repairing the Adamantine is concerned. It's very difficult to do. If it is starting to lift or peel away from the underlying wood, you should glue it back down in a manner similar to what you might try with wood veneer.

    For repairing/restoring areas of loss, if the area is small you may be able to find paint to match the color and pattern and then top coat with a clear finish but upon close inspection it won't be seamless.

    There's no hurry here. You may want to focus on the movement right now. You may want to scrounge up some of the supplies you may need to repair the case. Hopefully, you'll have what you need around the house.

    At a minimum I think you'll need a set of standard screwdrivers, glue, some clamps, sawdust, "Goop" or "GoJo" (with no pumice) waterless hand cleaner, plenty of clean, soft rags, automobile polish and wax, 4-0 Steel Wool should get you started. If you find that there are missing fasteners? You'll want to replace them with appropriately sized wood screws.

    Just like with the movement, take plenty of photos as you disassemble the case.

    Look closely at that crack and let us know what you find.


    Bruce
     
  6. Salsagev

    Salsagev Registered User

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    Thanks for the previous reply’s. I found these tiny punches.

    AA6BB8D7-5521-4EDC-9F4A-E646D327637C.jpeg
     
  7. Salsagev

    Salsagev Registered User

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    So I started disassembling the case. I notice black wood all over, should I sand it down so it looks new? And how do I use a rotary tools of buff the goop stuff without have it it flying across the room?
     
  8. Salsagev

    Salsagev Registered User

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  9. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
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    #9 Bruce Alexander, Jul 24, 2020
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2020
    No, definitely not.
    I don't use a rotary tool on antique surfaces such as these. I use a clean cloth and elbow grease.

    My advice to you is to go slow and steady. Apply the Goop with a clean cloth. Keep applying and rubbing it across the surface one area at a time. The Goop will lift dirt and film, the cloth will capture it. When the cloth becomes dirty, change to a clean area of the cloth (or get a new cloth) apply more Goop until the cloth no longer picks up dirt from the surface. With that area clean, move on to the next.

    It will take time and some effort. This is a plastic veneer. You must be careful with it.

    Good luck,

    Bruce
     
  10. Salsagev

    Salsagev Registered User

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    Thanks. How do I get the paint splatter off?
     
  11. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
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    I can often coax paint splatter off of smooth finishes like Admantine, Shellac, Lacquer, etc. by using the edge of something like a craft (popsicle) stick. The paint usually pops right off then it's a matter of cleaning, polishing the surface. If you need something harder than wood, a knife or screwdriver blade, just be very careful and controlled with your application of force. Go laterally against the paint, not down into the finish.

    Be sure to carefully look over that link I provided in Post #3. Nothing about paint removal but there are a lot of other good tips to be found .

    Bruce
     
  12. Salsagev

    Salsagev Registered User

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    4CC6B5B8-8372-4DC6-B468-3D89CFCBDBE7.jpeg 45072DB0-D1FC-4114-96B3-2B1A7AC79962.jpeg Do I need to restore the dial? I also found this writing inside. What does this mean? What are those cardboard punches from before and do I need them?
     
  13. Salsagev

    Salsagev Registered User

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    And do I need to just clean and not repaint as the other thread said?
     
  14. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
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    I would not touch your dial. It looks pretty good for its age to me. There's some slight loss but not bad.
    [​IMG]

    What do you think?

    Don't know what that is. I've never seen anything like that on any of the Seth Thomas Adamantine clocks I've worked with. My guess is that some clock shop person wrote them in forsome reason. :?|

    Can you show more of the clock around them? I'm having trouble visualizing where they are and what I'm looking at. Thanks.

    If you're talking about the metal ornaments and feet, I would try cleaning them first and then decide what you want to do. Very often, a good cleaning is all that is needed.
     
  15. Salsagev

    Salsagev Registered User

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    The dian is slightly peeeeling off.
    It’s just punches inside the columns where it’s hollow inside I don’t have pics now but tomorrow maybe.
     
  16. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
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    #16 Bruce Alexander, Jul 25, 2020
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2020
    When you say peeling off, are you talking about the numbers, like 6 through 10, or is the paper dial coming off of the pan? If the dial itself is starting to peel off of the pan, simply use a little adhesive to tack it back down.

    If you're concerned about the loss of ink, of course, it's really up to you. You could take a photo, use a photo editing program or application to clean up the image and then print out the reproduction on appropriate paper stock (you don't want something that is bright white), cut it out and glue it on. You'll probably have to remove the original since this dial is in two pieces with the center ring. Perhaps not. I've never replaced one like this.

    There are also pre-printed reproduction dials you can by and fit up to your clock, but they seldom match the original and are obvious replacements.

    Alternatively you might consider stabilizing the original dial. You could carefully clean it. Perhaps "touch up" the larger areas of loss (I wouldn't try this. It usually ends in disaster). Then you could finish by protecting the dial with archival aerosols varnishes you can apply to the paper. Krylon and Soluvar are two brands. Here's an example:
    Krylon.jpg

    See this Thread for some ideas and details: Paper Dial Stabilization

    It's good that you're thinking about the condition of the dial now and in the future. :thumb:
    Just be careful not to make things worse. I have a number of clocks which I wish that some owner in the past had just left the dial alone.

    Okay. If I understand what you're describing, I would say "yes". You should put them back in. They are probably intended to keep the hollow celluloid columns tightly in place, but not too tight.

    If you get a chance to post more photos, that would be great, but if I've understood and answered your question, don't worry about it.
     
  17. Salsagev

    Salsagev Registered User

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    Thanks for the suggestions, how would I go about coloring the line work on the front?
     
  18. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
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    See this Thread by gleber: RESTORATION HOW TO: Gold Incising

    You have some areas of damage that you'll have to be careful not to highlight with gold fill. You might try to match the original finish with touch up paint first and/or filling the cracks with wax. In any case, you'll have to be careful to apply a small amount of gold paint at a time.

    You have some challenges with this clock!

    Good luck.

    Bruce
     
  19. Salsagev

    Salsagev Registered User

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    Thanks. Wow, you have a Rosalind clock! Very nice!
     
  20. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
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    Thank you Salsagev.

    I'm sure you'll have a very nice Seth Thomas "Sucile" when you're done.
    One that was not headed in a very good direction before you took it in.
    It could have very easily ended up in someone's boneyard.

    Don't hesitate to ask more questions if something is not clear, or if you just want to be sure before you continue. ;)

    Bruce
     
  21. Salsagev

    Salsagev Registered User

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    Thanks. I now have two st adamntine and the other has the wire thing too as this one does. The seller is expecting some before/after results. The case is now fully disassembled and all parts are cleaned. Just the screws are not yet. I tried a drill attached with a toothbrush and I spun it around very fast in a small jar with some brasso.
     
  22. Salsagev

    Salsagev Registered User

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    I’m having a bit trouble with the epoxy and flying back the adamantine because the sheets of adamantine just don’t fit like it has shrunk.
     
  23. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
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    Hey Salsagev.

    Can you show us some photos and give us a little more detail to go on?

    It sounds like you're trying to glue loose Adamantine Veneer to the underlying wood.

    Obviously you'll want to stop what you're doing immediately. Some glues might actually "melt" the celluloid. When in doubt when trying something new, always do a small test on an inconspicuous area.

    A lot of chemicals don't play nice with one another.

    Bruce
     
  24. Salsagev

    Salsagev Registered User

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    I will later. I’m not at That house today. Just got to writing the message right now. I used the epoxy glue. I took it off the wood before it tried.
     
  25. Salsagev

    Salsagev Registered User

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    Here’s some pictures.

    B77022EC-A1D7-4E87-951B-04750C32A3C8.jpeg B578393B-674D-4C38-9EE1-1F061267F996.jpeg 6AE89201-521A-43CC-B4B5-4E99BEEB9D6C.jpeg
     
  26. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
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    That doesn't look bad to me.
    In your first photo, there's a crack. I don't think that there is a lot you can do with that. Once the edges of a adamantine are firmly glued to the underlying wood, maybe fill in the crack(s) with several coats of matching paint...perhaps acrylic paint (or mixture of paints) from a hobby/art store.

    Your second photo appears to show some separation of wood layers. They need to be re-glued. Period appropriate material would be hide glue, but wood glue or even epoxy would be fine. It's not a wood joint and the board was never supposed to delaminate like that so try to get it back together to stay this time is what I think.

    The third photo looks good based on what I can see.

    What are your concerns?

    Bruce
     
  27. Salsagev

    Salsagev Registered User

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    Those pictures are of the same board.
     
  28. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
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    Okay. I can only comment on what I can see and you're showing three different views.
    It changes nothing as far as my comments are concerned.

    What do you mean by "flying back the adamantine"?
     
  29. Salsagev

    Salsagev Registered User

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    The wood has shrunk and the wood has too so all these broken pieces of wood don’t go back together perfectly.
     
  30. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
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    Looks like you're going to need some woodworking clamps.

    [​IMG]

    The core of the board looks intact. As you've said, the veneer which supports the adamantine is split and looks like it has shrunk significantly. I've not come across that before.
    Perhaps there was some swelling of the wood first. Do you see this kind of damage anywhere else?

    Do you have any experience gluing wood and do you have any clamps?

    It looks like you'll need to glue the wood back together across the board's thickness and width. I would probably use a good quality wood glue, or hide glue and several c-clamps across the thickness along with one or two longer clamps across the width. Epoxy glue may not clean up very well. I would probably stay away from it when working on the wood. It will just become a mess, especially on the adamantine with clamps in the way.

    You may not be able to close the cracks completely but you should at least be able to reduce their width and glue everything down to stabilize things.

    Do a dry run without glue first to see how much you can close the cracks. Don't apply too much force with the clamps. Just enough to bring the outer wood veneer back into contact with the core.

    Perhaps someone with more wood working experience will weigh in with a better suggestion.

    Good luck
     
  31. Salsagev

    Salsagev Registered User

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    I have clamps but not much experience. It doesent fit together very well.
     
  32. Bruce Alexander

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    Take the case to a furniture finisher or a cabinet maker/woodworker/carpenter's shop if you're worried that you might damage it further. That might not be a bad idea anyway.

    Bruce
     
  33. Salsagev

    Salsagev Registered User

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    Ok, I will work something out.
     
  34. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
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    Try contacting this member: tom427cid

    He's a cabinetmaker. No doubts he can help with some good suggestions.

    Good luck.

    Bruce
     
  35. FatrCat

    FatrCat Registered User
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    You never want to directly apply clamps, especially "C" clamps in contact with your finished surfaces. Use a 1X2 or 1X4 of a tight grained wood such as cabinet-grade birch that will span the full width of the piece, put one on the front, and one on the back, then clamp using those boards to transfer the clamping pressure onto the clock case. The birch pieces will help to align the pieces your repairing, plus prevent the clamp's feet from marring or indenting your clock's case. See the attached drawing. Crude and quick, sorry, but should give you the right idea.

    safe-clamp.jpg
     
  36. Bruce Alexander

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    Nice to see you here FatrCat.

    Good tip. Of course, it really depends on the types of clamps you have to work with and the situation (or joint) that you're trying to glue up.

    Not really sure what the situation is that the OP is dealing with here. It almost looks like the core board underneath the veneer became swollen. Perhaps it was in a little bit of standing water.

    In any case, the damage may be very difficult to reverse since closing the split ends involves repositioning and gluing down the loose veneer in two dimensions (width and thickness).

    As our young OP has stated,

    I'm really hoping that Tom is around and can weigh in. He has demonstrated some beautiful wood restorative work on clock cases.

    Regards,

    Bruce
     
  37. FatrCat

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    #37 FatrCat, Aug 5, 2020
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2020
    I haven't done much with actual clock cabinets, but did a lot of antique furniture restoration, custom cabinetry and joinery work for close to 25 years, so this thread caught my attention. It definitely doesn't look like a project suited for the light-hearted or beginner. Makes me really wish for the one incredible restoration tool in my arsenal which I actually do not have at the moment; a Mohawk Furniture Repair Kit. With one of these, just about any repair job was made possible.

    Probably the most challenging, and most fun, project I took on in restoration was repair and refinishing of an incredible burl panel walnut roll-top desk which had been in a house fire. Only a small section of the upper-most shelf had actually burned, also losing around 1/3rd of it's hand-carved decorative railing, but the intense heat had left the entire desk totally blackened, cooking the finish to the point all I originally had to go on was the owner's faint memory of what the piece had looked like when she was a young child. Following the fire the desk had been placed in storage where it had remained nearly forty years until my client inherited all the furnishings. Now I'm going to have to hunt up my photos of it; one of the most stunning pieces I've ever seen.
     
  38. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
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    That's interesting. Any ideas as to what is/was going on here? To me it looks like a problem with moisture (or lack thereof). I've worked on several Seth Thomas Adamantine Mantel Clocks and have not seen this type of veneer damage before.

    To close those cracks, it looks like he would need to compress the width of the underlying core. Perhaps it's not as bad as it looks in the photo. That's why I suggested that he try a dry run before applying any glue. Closing the width of the split in the veneer will be the very critical to a good repair. Gluing them down across the thickness of the piece would stabilize things.

    What type of glue would you use?

    Bruce
     
  39. FatrCat

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    #39 FatrCat, Aug 5, 2020
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2020
    I'd agree, Bruce; this sort of delamination is usually caused by some type of seriously "wet" event or prolonged very high humidity levels. To a lesser degree, but not to be ruled out would be that a combination of very dry conditions and age along with a marginal or weak original bonding either by too little glue or a weak glue. This, too, could be the cause.

    Since there most likely will be some problems in restoring this laminate panel section due to chips of veneer still attached to the center boards, and the advantage here in the fact that only one side of the assembly is an outer finished cabinet section, I would be very tempted to take things down further, separating the inner veneer panel from the package, then separating the center panel from the outer finished panel section. This provides access to scrape / sand / clean up all the mating surfaces. Then if necessary I would bolster the rigidity of the center panel with addition of a few dowels or biscuits when re-glueing it together (although since it isn't much more than a narrow frame surrounding the dial face opening, the center board may already be fairly in tact as it is. Once I had the center board solid and cleaned, I'd then glue and re-attach the inside veneer plank, allow this all to dry and get solid before then re-attaching the finished outer veneer panel. And absolutely; throughout the entire cleaning / preparation to re-sandwich the pieces, one would be very wise to test and double-check fits 'dry' before committing to any glue work.

    A slight modification in method that might be advantageous here, too, would be not to re-attach the inside veneer panel but instead replace it with a new one, ideally with something along the lines of a plywood flooring underlayment, readily available in 1/4" and similar thicknesses that should be near the existing panel thickness. Right now both the inner and outer panels grain runs in the same direction; switching to one side with an alternate grain or plywood composition would greatly help in long-term stability. In repairing the panel lay-up, I would see an aliphatic / PVA wood glue such as Titebond II to be ideal and easy to work with.

    As to the Adamantine layer, if it is only loose in small areas near the splits in the outer panel, I would probably re-bond the loose areas with either a non-flammable contact cement or 3M Trim Adhesive Spray, applying either by sliding a thin putty knife or utility blade coated in the adhesive underneath the loose areas, allowing a few minutes 'tack' time, then "booking" the surfaces for a few hours until cured. (3M Super 77 would also work, however it's a bit higher in carrying agent levels, meaning it would stay wet longer and might have a higher potential for reacting with the celluloid.) I've used the 3M Trim Adhesive Spray with Adamantine myself, and never had any issues with it- just keeping the quantity to a minimum and having a quick tack/drying time.

    Another "glass is half full" aspect here is that thankfully this is the center face panel surrounding the dial face/bezel, so it's a smaller, broken up finish surface area where splits or cracks in the finish surface will remain contained to that area and not potentially "grow", plus they are less visible to begin with. If this were the top panel and split to this extent I'd not even attempt to put it together and have full width cracks in the Adamanitine, opting instead for finding a complimentary companion finish I could use on the top.

    I've not actually started on this project idea as yet, but have been rounding up all my materials first: As a custom home builder, I also worked a lot with solid surface materials, e.g. Corian, Jetta, etc. so I've amassed a rather large stash of the stuff, some large pieces, and many smaller 'scrap' pieces from countertop and bath installations (so many of the granite-style versions too darned good looking to just throw away, and always nice for small display bases, etc. ) My project plan here is to build a complete clock cabinet, in the mantel clock style, completely made from Corian. In effect, a "new age" marble mantel clock. Could turn out some gorgeous looking pieces , and no doubt like them so much I'll have a hard time parting with any, lol.
     
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  40. Salsagev

    Salsagev Registered User

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    I actually have a non marring clamp so it should help.
     
  41. FatrCat

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    Non-marring is good, but with some potential of sections also now having a little individual warping to them, use of a 'one-by' plank to span all the sections while clamped will automatically help to ensure the completed panel will dry 'in plane', allowing for the joints themselves to compensate for any mild warps, instead of the final surface looking 'cupped' like the surface of a lake in a mild breeze.
     
  42. Salsagev

    Salsagev Registered User

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    But you see, I had already glued some pieces back together so I would think I need to saw off the pieces to follow this.
     
  43. Bruce Alexander

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    Sounds very good Cat. Thanks for weighing in. If this were my clock, I would prefer to stay with as much of the original materials as possible. This is a challenging case, but at least the Adamantine veneer appears to be all there and otherwise undamaged.

    Sal, please post some photos of where you are now before you do anything else?
     
  44. Salsagev

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  45. Bruce Alexander

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    #45 Bruce Alexander, Aug 6, 2020
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2020
    Sal,

    Nice job! What you've done so far looks pretty good to me. :thumb:

    My concern now is over the warped segment pictured in the upper right corner of photos 4-6.

    The gaps are obvious. What I can not see is whether the wood warps out of the plane formed by the rest of the piece.

    If there is just the gap, and the rest of the fit is relatively flat, I would glue the mating surfaces together and then use an epoxy wood filler to fill in the gaps before gluing the Adamantine Veneer back into place.

    If the piece is warped in such a way that it is "lifting" toward the viewer of the photo, you'll need to level it. Perhaps after gluing, some careful sanding with coarse through fine grit sandpaper will do the trick for you. If the piece is warped away from the viewer, wood filler might be used there too prior to gluing the Adamantine back in place.

    A skilled woodworker could remake that part for you but I think that would be a lot of work for a good fit and finish. I don't think it is necessary if you can get over this latest hurdle.

    That's how I see things in the photos you've shared. Thanks for posting them btw.

    I know that you must be anxious to finish this part up but wait a while to see if FatrCat and/or others will weigh in with observations and suggestions before you do anything further.



    Bruce

    Edit: This missing black internal veneer (seen in photos 1-3) is probably not significant. If you have it, glue it back together. If not, I wouldn't worry too much about it. You may wish to fill/tighten some of the fastener holes when you start to reassemble the case. Also keep an eye on how level the case will sit when fully assembled. Sometimes warped cases will only sit on 3 of their 4 feet. That's not a very stable platform for a pendulum movement to operate in. Watch for problems here as things go back together. If things are close, a solution might be as simple as placing a small, inconspicuous shim between the case and the "light" foot. Just something to keep in mind as you progress...
     
  46. Salsagev

    Salsagev Registered User

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    I don’t even understand why the internal wood warped like that. Maybe it’s a factory caused?
     
  47. Bruce Alexander

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    There could have been a "flaw" in the wood used in your clock's case. I think that the core wood used in these clocks is Pine. It can warp quite a bit when it gets wet.
    I think that at some point in time your clock may have been exposed to a lot of moisture. Perhaps it was stored in a very damp basement or even exposed to standing water.
    Water wicks through wood. It can be steamed and bent into tight arcs.
    Did you notice any mold when you were cleaning things up? Perhaps it had been cleaned up a little before it came to your bench.
    The warped wood is not the only evidence.
    This looks suspicious as well:
    [​IMG]

    Keep up the good work.

    Bruce
     
  48. Salsagev

    Salsagev Registered User

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    There were spider webs in the columns. And since I got this in Wisconsin, it’s very wet and hot in the summer here.


    Btw, I have pm Tom as you suggested but he hasn’t answered yet.
     
  49. Bruce Alexander

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    I get the impression that Tom stays pretty busy. Of course I can't speak for him but If he has something to offer, he'll often weigh in with helpful advice.

    FatrCat has shared some very helpful experience and opinions.

    I think you're headed in the right direction.

    As I mentioned, I couldn't really tell how much that piece of wood has warped out of alignment with the rest of "Bezel Box" (my term). Do you think wood filler will be sufficient or are there 3 dimensional alignment issues to worry about?

    How's everything else with this clock coming along? Is the movement being tested? Is there anything else that needs attention?
     
  50. Salsagev

    Salsagev Registered User

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    I think the round bezel box is fine because all grains or whatever there called are matching. I’m referring to the inside sides of the bezel box.


    I have not done anything with the movement because I’m lacking a clock reamer to fix the bushing.
     

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