Seth movement Spring Let Down?

clockpoor

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Jul 31, 2007
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I have this little movement from a Seth Thomas "Declaration" wall clock. This is a German produced movement that uses a spring winder that consists of a chord wrapped upon a little recoil mechanism. I have partially disassembled the movement but cannot figure out how to safely let down the spring. Hopefully there is some expertise on this who can advise me?

CP

I am attaching a couple of photos of the movement.
 

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Kevin W.

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Cp i cant see too well in your picture.But can you get acess to the click on the winding wheel?
 

clockpoor

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veritas said:
Cp i cant see too well in your picture.But can you get acess to the click on the winding wheel?
Yes, it is very easy to get to the click (see addtional photo), however it doesn't do anything. There is no pressure on the click at all. There seems to be another spring loaded stop on the bottom (additional photo) side that is taking all the pressure of the mainspring, I have been afraid to move it for fear of a runaway mainspring. Obviously I have never seen a set up like this and am totally confused about how to be able to let the mainspring down in a controlled manner.

CP
 

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Kevin W.

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CP i am no expert but if you have a good grip on your let down tool and take your time at it, shouldn,t it be the same as a normal setup on other clocks.Just dont loose control of the spring.
 

clockpoor

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Being the impatient sort, I decided to release the pressure on the mainspring by pressing on the click stop I described and shown in the above photo. The result is I did let the mainspring down and by having a key on the winding arbor I was able to somewhat control the release. So immediate problem resolved.

The main reason for this excersise is to clean the movement, which although it does not seem to be real dirty there is very little power getting to the escape mechanism. Subsequently the movement will not run for more than a few minutes at a time most of the time and when it does run for any length of time it is slow to the point of loosing several minutes a day, more than can be adjsted out via the balance spring.

The above being said, so far balance wheel movements have proven to be eluding my ability to get them running properly. Maybe if I tinker with enough of them eventually I will learn enough to have a chance at getting one to run properly?

CP
 

Scottie-TX

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Don't feel alone on that matter, CP. I never did warm up to them spring balances. Guess I just never became interested enough to become proficient with them.
 

Kevin W.

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Good going CP.I have had some luck with those balances, but the time keeping part is tricky.
 

shutterbug

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clockpoor said:
The above being said, so far balance wheel movements have proven to be eluding my ability to get them running properly. Maybe if I tinker with enough of them eventually I will learn enough to have a chance at getting one to run properly?

CP
Yes, give me a watch with a pendulum! :clap: My eyes aren't as good as they used to be, and I use that as an excuse .... but there are some really amazing watch guys out there that don't let age slow them down at all. I've had some experience with balance mechanisms and can tell you they are much more sensitive to perfection than clocks. The good news is that they are all the same (pretty much) in function and timing so you don't get the unknown so much. I think I'll be an expert within the next 50 years ....... barring death, of course :)
 

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