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Sessions movement help

Bob2701

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Oct 26, 2021
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Hi all, I'm new here and attempting to learn how to disassembly a Sessions movement. I have had this clock for at least 50 years and it was not new when I got it, my father in law rebuilt it for my wife. I have oiled it every couple of years and it ran great. Last week it stopped running and I gave it a 24 hour soak in a clock cleaning solution from Clockworks. That seemed to help but I would really like to disassembly the movement for a good cleaning but am afraid I may not be able to get it back together again. Can someone recommend a good book the explains this particular movement? I would really like to know what to look for while disassembling. Thanks for any help.

IMG_0571.jpg IMG_0572.jpg
 

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Vernon

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Dec 9, 2006
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Right on this website are a "Hints and How to" and "How to do it" sections that contain articles that may answer most of your questions. I'm not aware of a book specific to Sessions but could be. Take lots of pictures. You will need to let down the mainsprings safely before you can disassemble.

Vernon
 
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Willie X

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Feb 9, 2008
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A let-down tool will be the only special tool needed at the start. It can be bought, or made, from a hardwood broom handle or 1" hardwood dowell. The spring retainer can be common 17 guage iron tie wire, or a screw/band type hose clamp.

Note, the axial hole for the key shank needs to be 5/16". The cross cut for the key wing needs to be about 5/8" deep and as wide as a common hand saw blade.

20200112_182525.jpg

Bushing work will require about a $150 expenditure for tools and bushings. You may want to look up 'checking for wear'.

Willie X
 
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Bob2701

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Oct 26, 2021
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Right on this website are a "Hints and How to" and "How to do it" sections that contain articles that may answer most of your questions. I'm not aware of a book specific to Sessions but could be. Take lots of pictures. You will need to let down the mainsprings safely before you can disassemble.

Vernon
Thanks Vernon, I have to order C clamps and a let down tool before I do anything. I'll check out those sections of the forum.

Bob
 

Bob2701

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Oct 26, 2021
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A let-down tool will be the only special tool needed at the start. It can be bought, or made, from a hardwood broom handle or 1" hardwood dowell. The spring retainer can be common 17 guage iron tie wire, or a screw/band type hose clamp.

Note, the axial hole for the key shank needs to be 5/16". The cross cut for the key wing needs to be about 5/8" deep and as wide as a common hand saw blade.

View attachment 678245

Bushing work will require about a $150 expenditure for tools and bushings. You may want to look up 'checking for wear'.

Willie X
Willie X, I do like your let down handle and your suggestion of a hose clamp.

Thanks, Bob
 

shutterbug

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Read up on 'bushing using hand tools'. You clock will have a lot of wear at the pivot points, and the power from the springs could no longer overpower the wear. You'll likely be doing several bushings in it.
 
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Willie X

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That looks like suspended ceiling wire? I think it's a little more brittle than 'tie' wire.
You can buy 'soft iron tie wire' at any hardware store, no need to order it. Common sizes are 16, 17, and 18 guage. Willie X
 
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R. Croswell

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Apr 4, 2006
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For this clock, 16 gage wire would be better but I have use 18 gage wire without a problem. That is steel wire - copper or aluminum wire should never be used. Never heard of 17 gage being offered but I would be be concerned about the "Made in China" part. Go to a contractor supply store or Lowes or Home Depot and get 16 gage rebar tie wire and you should be good for just about any spring that comes your way. (FYI the smaller the number the thicker the wire). Tie wire will be "soft" enough to twist, other types of steel wire may be strong enough but you may not be able to twist the ends easily.

RC
 
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Willie X

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Feb 9, 2008
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I've successfully used the 3 mentioned guages for many years and for general use, I like the #17 best.

But don't waist your time looking for it, if #16 is readily available, buy that. :)Willie X
 
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