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sessions horse clock

itbme1987

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May 18, 2008
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I dont usually ever play with electric clocks but when a pretty lady asked me to look at this one i couldnt refuseo:). Anyway the clock wont run, i pulled out the works and if i give it a spin start by hand it will run but it wounds like something isnt balanced right, sounds like its scraping something on the inside, are these rotors repairable or will i need a replacement? its fitted to the movement by 3 posts that when you turn them you can pull the rotor from the gearing. Thank you very much. Photo 1.jpg Photo 2.jpg
 

eskmill

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Aug 24, 2000
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It is likely that the motor's rotor shaft is binding in its bearings. The rotor and its shaft can be removed by pressing the worm off the shaft. The flywheel like rotor disk is somewhat delicate. I have never been successful in attempting to remove the rotor disk but the worm can be forced off to free the rotor and shaft from the motor field assembly.

Some kind of tool has to be used to remove the worm off the shaft such as a very powerful clock hand puller; a pair of "paint can lid removers. I forced a small "pickle fork" under the worm and used a small flat faced punch to drive the worm off the shaft.

The front and rear bushings can be cleaned with a sharpened orange wood stick. Lubricate the bushings liberally as they are sometimes sintered bronze and have pores to absorb light lubricants.

You may need to add a small thin washer on the shaft to control "end-play" or shake when replacing the worm. Some light grease is needed on the worm gears.
 

coldwar

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May 20, 2009
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Actually it is far easier to drive shaft out of rotor removing shaft and worm gear in one piece for service. Back the gear end of the field/coil assembly on a block with a hole to allow shaft/gear clearance. There very often is a small steel washer on shaft under rotor, don't lose it. With the shaft and rotor removed you can peg out the bushings and dig the grime out of the recess around the bushing on the rotor end of the assembly, and clean the rotor and shaft/gear. I lubricate with automatic transmission fluid adding perhaps six drops internally to hopefully add some reserve to internal wick, and then some Moebius grease in recess around bushing on rotor end of field. There is very little to gain in trying to install bushings, very difficult to secure and align bushings, then broaching the holes creates chips difficult to completely remove. Install shaft/gear, washer, then gently drive rotor on to shaft, then test to verify alignment and hopefully quiet operation. These can soldier on for decades this way, though perhaps not absolutely silent.
 

itbme1987

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May 18, 2008
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ok i got it apart, would it hurt of i treated these bearings like any other and dip the pegwood stick in acetone? also should i worry about the other gearson the clock? the nuts that hold the plates togather are right behind the dial.