Sessions Electric

Discussion in 'Electric Horology' started by Ed Schmitt, Oct 19, 2004.

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  1. Ed Schmitt

    Ed Schmitt Registered User
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    Aug 30, 2003
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    I have a Sessions electric clock with a sweep second hand in for repair. It appears that the motor is bad and needs to be replaced. Not having worked on many electric clocks, I need some help. The movement is mounted to the back plate via three rivets that just twist off the movement. The only mark on the front plate is the letter "A". The movement is triangular in shape. The worm gear on the motor prevents me from opening the motor. Replacement motors from Merritts, SLaRose are different. Is there a place to get replacement sessions motors, or will I have to adapt a current non sessions motor to the clock. Thanks
     
  2. Ed Schmitt

    Ed Schmitt Registered User
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    Aug 30, 2003
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    I have a Sessions electric clock with a sweep second hand in for repair. It appears that the motor is bad and needs to be replaced. Not having worked on many electric clocks, I need some help. The movement is mounted to the back plate via three rivets that just twist off the movement. The only mark on the front plate is the letter "A". The movement is triangular in shape. The worm gear on the motor prevents me from opening the motor. Replacement motors from Merritts, SLaRose are different. Is there a place to get replacement sessions motors, or will I have to adapt a current non sessions motor to the clock. Thanks
     
  3. Greg R.

    Greg R. Guest

    GOOD LUCK!
    I've been working on one for months. This motor has plastic to protect the coil and terminals(the movement is listed in Ly's book of Sessions Clocks). Needless to say what ever one I found, disintigrated when I tried to work with it. I never did find a good way to repair this. The problem I had was not in the cleaning of the movement(although the first gear meshing with the worm gear from the motor did break), it was with the coil. I finally gave up on it, and purchased one of the "quartz electric" movements from the supply catalogs. I hope someone can shed some light.

    Wish I could have been better help.
    Greg
     
  4. Ed Schmitt

    Ed Schmitt Registered User
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    Aug 30, 2003
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    Greg
    I've been able to identify the electric motor. It is a A.W.Haydon electric clock motor ca. 1934-36. If anyone has such a motor please let me know. I hope you find yours also Greg. Thanks

    Ed
     
  5. Bill Keller

    Bill Keller Guest

    Ed:
    Many of the old Sessions motors can be rejuvenated provided the wires to the coils are extant. If they are try this -- place the motor on its back and spray some Radio Shack tv tuner cleaner and lubricant around the worm gear shaft. Leave it overnight and then spray it again. Connect the coil wires to a power cord, and carefully holding the motor by the magnet coil, plug in the power cord. Initially you may have to help the rotor to start to spin, but the cleaner should have softened the oil around the shaft enough to permit it to turn
    once the power line is plugged in.
     
  6. Ed Schmitt

    Ed Schmitt Registered User
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    Bill
    Thanks for the advice, I'll have to try it and let you know what happens.

    Ed
     
  7. mrb

    mrb Guest

    the rotor can be removed. bearings driven out.
    regrease. install bearings. replace rotor.
    je colemans book from awi has an article with description and procedure.spraying and hoping some lubricant enters bearing cavity is not a good longterm approach.
     
  8. Ed Schmitt

    Ed Schmitt Registered User
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    I'd try and take it apart and give everything a try, but I can't seem to get the worm gear off the arbor. Anyone have suggestions.

    Ed
     
  9. TEACLOCKS

    TEACLOCKS Registered User
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    Mar 22, 2005
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    IF YOU HAVE A SPRING WINDER USE A SPRING RETAINER THAT THE ROTOR FITS IN AND USE A DRIFT PUNCH TO DRIVE THE SHAFT THROUGH THE WORM GEAR AND MOTOR, AND THE WORM GEAR WILL BE FREE.
     
  10. focusrsh_b07732

    focusrsh_b07732 Registered User
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    Dec 17, 2009
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    I know this is a 16 year old discussion, but...
    Simply suspend the outer edges of the motor (NOT the rotor!!!) across the faces of a vice and then use a pin-punch to drive the rotor shaft out of the worm gear.
     

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