Sessions Electric Mantel Clock No 182 D J

Larry48075

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Mar 23, 2009
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I bought this Sessions clock yesterday at a local flea market. It is in excellent condition, except for a short scratch on the top of the case and some on the back. Parts of the chiming mechanism were severely stuck with congealed oil, but I managed to clean it up and oil it, and now the clocks works well, though the chiming is a bit wrong at 30 and 45 minutes past the hour. This clock is interesting in that it has two electric motors, one for time and the other for the chiming mechanism.

I have searched around the net, but I cannot find another example of this case style. Is this one so rare? Also, is the "36 10" stamped on the label the manufacture date?


Larry
 

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harold bain

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Larry, Tran's Sessions book shows your clock from a 1936 catalog, so that is a date code on the label. But the 182 DJ is supposed to be a self starting motor. Your instructions make me wonder if yours is self starting?
Neat clock.:thumb:
 

Larry48075

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Larry, Tran's Sessions book shows your clock from a 1936 catalog, so that is a date code on the label. But the 182 DJ is supposed to be a self starting motor. Your instructions make me wonder if yours is self starting?
Neat clock.:thumb:
Thank you for the information. The drive train motor does have a little knob on the back which sure looks like it's there for starting the motor, but the motor starts by itself every time, and it won't run backwards, so I am somewhat confused. I wonder if this was an early transitional self-starting motor.

The clock is pretty big. The bezel is about 6 3/4" in diameter, and the base of the clock is about 16 3/4" long. It has at least temporarily displaced the Seth Thomas Ludbury in my dining room. I can't decide which one to keep there. I really like art deco, and this clock case has a bit of art deco in it, but the Seth Thomas has a fancier case. Both clocks are in great shape. Interestingly, I the style of the numbers on the dial is almost identical between the Sessions and Seth Thomas clocks.
Don't you just hate it when you see something at the flea market that won't let you leave without it;)?


Larry
 

harold bain

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Don't you just hate it when you see something at the flea market that won't let you leave without it;)?
Yeah, just terrible when that happens:whistle:. Your size matches the catalog description, with a height of 9 3/4 inches. The burl walnut veneer looks pretty good on these.
Perhaps the labels were just stamped with the model numbers, without changing instructions when the self starting motors started to be used. The case definitely has a 1930's look to it.
 

eskmill

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I seriously doubt that the time train motor is original on this Sessions two-motor chime clock. The original Sessions chime clock motors were "spin-to-start" type and the seconds bit at the front of the case serves as the spinner in addition to providing visual indication that the clock was running and to be trusted.

Spin-to-start was actually an important "feature" on mains powered electrics of the 1930's when utility electric was subject to frequent outages. Electric clocks of the day that were self-starting got bad reviews; they were said to be "always wrong" because self-starters could stop for ten or fifteen minutes until "the juice" came back, then went merrily along ten or fifteen minutes late.

Curiously, the tiny motor at the upper right of the back of the movement, used to operate the chime train, is a shaded pole self-starting type. Its powered anytime the clock has "juice" and runs stalled most of the hour waiting for the chime train to unlock.

The earliest GE-Telechron clocks did not have the "red flag" until well into the electric clock fad.
 
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Larry48075

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The time train motor sure looks original. The wires, coil, rotor, etc. are very much like on the chime motor.

The explanation about the seconds spinner explains to me why the second hand is so thick.

Larry
 

harold bain

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All the electrics shown in Tran's book, page 242-243, from the 1936 catalog, feature self starting motors (including Larry's clock). They all have the second bit in that position. However, page 241 has 3 electric clocks described as "Manual Starting Electrics". These are also 1936, so perhaps the Sessions self starter motors were quite new at this time. Tran doesn't show the electric clocks pictures for page 241, so I can't tell if they had the same seconds bit.
 

Larry48075

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What might be the purpose of the knob on the back of the motor? Is it possible that this was an early self-starting motor and the knob was there to spin just in case?

Larry
 

harold bain

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I would suspect that when they changed to self starting motors (perhaps in 1936) they had a surplus of movements ready to use spin start motors.
 

Alison1125

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Jan 18, 2021
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I bought this Sessions clock yesterday at a local flea market. It is in excellent condition, except for a short scratch on the top of the case and some on the back. Parts of the chiming mechanism were severely stuck with congealed oil, but I managed to clean it up and oil it, and now the clocks works well, though the chiming is a bit wrong at 30 and 45 minutes past the hour. This clock is interesting in that it has two electric motors, one for time and the other for the chiming mechanism.

I have searched around the net, but I cannot find another example of this case style. Is this one so rare? Also, is the "36 10" stamped on the label the manufacture date?


Larry
Hi, I inherited this clock (Session Westminster Chime #182 D J. it does not work. It is in fair condition. I love the clock but have no place to put it. I also don't know if it can be repaired (the Sessions website does not contemplate repairs of their electric clocks). I would like anyone's advice about whether it has any value, or what I ought to do with it.
Thanks,
Alison Sessions clock front.jpeg Sessions clock label.jpeg
 

Karl Thies

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The clock time was started by turning the small second hand on the front clockwise . Unless you could get new coils for this clock I would not trust it as it is probably a fire hazzard in its present condition.
 
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Karl Thies

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If you like the looks of the clock, then get a battery fit up movement to replace the( (I assume) original movement. I have deep misgivings about using such an old electric movement, just as I would have misgivings of using a nearly 90 year old toaster. Value of these clocks are very low .
 

Alison1125

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If you like the looks of the clock, then get a battery fit up movement to replace the( (I assume) original movement. I have deep misgivings about using such an old electric movement, just as I would have misgivings of using a nearly 90 year old toaster. Value of these clocks are very low .
Thanks - I did not know that was possible. How would I find someone who would know how to swap out the works? Something battery-operated would be great.
 

Karl Thies

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Any clock repair shop could do it, or it is also easily DIY. You can get just time or time with electronic chimes.
 

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