Sessions 1946 model m

Discussion in 'Electric Horology' started by waricks, Jul 1, 2012.

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  1. waricks

    waricks Registered User

    Jun 2, 2008
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    I Was just given one of these clocks and it is in pretty nice shape. However when I plug it in it does not run. It seems simple enough but I have no idea what I am looking at. Are there any common problems that make this clock not run? It looks nice sitting there on the shelf but I just don't feel right knowing it doesn't run.

    Bill
     
  2. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    Bill: I'm putting this in Electric Horology, where I'm hoping it will receive a proper reply. In the meantime, pictures of clock and movement might be helpful.
     
  3. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User
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    Apparently your Sessions Model M passed the "smoke test." That is to say it didn't catch fire or blow a fuse when connected to your AC utility power.

    The next test is to connect it to electric power again and listen carefully for the normal dull hum sound which would suggest the motor may not be "fried" or have a burnt-out field winding. Does it hum audibly? No? Then leave the clock plugged in for at least a half hour. Does the motor become warmer than the clock case? If yes, it's warm; then the motor is not fried, just probably in need of mechanical service.

    If it doesn't hum and stays cool, then the field coil winding may be open or burned-out so-to-speak or the electric cord and or cord cap (legal name for the connecting plug) may be defective.
     
  4. waricks

    waricks Registered User

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    Eckmill

    Thanks for your reply. Yep no smoke or blown breakers! So plugged it in again and no hum. I let it sit for about 20 min and I checked for warmth. It was a tad warmer but what I did notice as I touched the back plate of the movement was a small vibration. So I grabbed a nut driver and took the back plate off and carefully plugged it in. As soon as I did it started working. I think the back plate was touching the spinner on the back of the motor. I put it back on and left it a little loose and it is working great - maybe a little fast. Anyway to slow it down?
     
  5. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User
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    It is pleasing Waricks that you've solved the main issue with your Sessions AC electric clock but I'm somewhat concerned that you've reported that the rate is "a little fast" which is against the law! :cop: (laws of physics)

    Your Sessions clock and similar all operate in harmony with the alternations of the "giant generating machine" at the other end of the the incoming wires. Their AC generators are "tightly" locked to the "grid." There is no practical means for the local power producer to "inject" or "delete" an cycle or two without creating a complete "outage."

    In my prior life I investigated utility electrical power distribution issues. There was one single occasion that an AC synchronous clock intermittently gained. The clock was a Heathkit digital electronic timepiece that the owner assembled. It did gain minutes on week-days when the nearby machine shop shut-down. We temporarily installed some capacitors across the residential line in an attempt to convince the utility power provider to permanently add a filter. Instead, the utility power company relocated the service line to the residence to another source.

    On this message board there was a report of a certain older model Seth Thomas AC electric clock that would gain but the thread more or less died without resolution. We did conjecture that it was possible with the particular motor.
     
  6. waricks

    waricks Registered User

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    Well - actually it was my mistake. It seemed like it was running a tad fast but I have kept an eye on it all day and it is dead on! I am excited to have us clock going the only problem is I like clocks that make noise. I love the tick tock and hourly chimes of my other clocks. But as I said it does keep good time so now it is time to clean up the wood and find a place to put it.
     
  7. waricks

    waricks Registered User

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    Here are some pictures of the clock. Is there anything I should lube on the clock. This is my wife's favorite out of ,y collection as there is no winding or noise.
     

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  8. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
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    Yes, a good clock oil should be applied to all the bushings. You will need to take the movement out to access them. Even better, strip it and clean it first.
     
  9. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User
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    #9 eskmill, Jul 7, 2012
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2012
    Harold Bain gives good advice. The bushings or bearing holes require lubricant that remains in place. Electric clocks, unlike wind-up clocks have fast merging gear teeth. Despite the very light loads, the high speed of engagement requires lubricant; again one that "stays put." A heavy oil or almost grease is the optimal lubricant, especially on the large, fine toothed fiber composite gear.

    It is important for the case of the clock to be somewhat tightly closed so as to resist airborne dust that would adhere to the oily gear wheel teeth. The composition of household or office dust is a combination of dander and silica; very abrasive.
     

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