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SWCC Self Winding Clock Company Model 61

SlickRick

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Jan 15, 2015
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Hi Folks,

I have a SWCC model 61 clock I am hoping to restore. Unfortunately, some of the parts that make it a useful clock are missing. Namely the dial and the pendulum.
I am not so worried about the pendulum as I am the dial.

I am wondering what you folks think are my options for a replacement dial. I have considered making replica but I have been unable to match the number font. Alot of western union slaves have this font but I can't find the artwork anywhere.
I can draft the chapter ring easy enough and I have the artwork for the seconds dial but I am hung up on the numbers.

Anyway, I would like to hear what others think about replacement/replica dials. And any other info about restoring it.

Attached is a photo of what the dial should look like.

Thanks in advance

Rick
 

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Ralph

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Rick, a "Broadway" font is similar. I couldn't find an exact match, but there are variants.

Ralph
 

jkfabulos

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Aug 21, 2001
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Do a search for specific clock dials on the big auction site and you could get lucky.
 

SlickRick

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Jan 15, 2015
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Hi Folks,

Here is an update on my SWCC Model 61. The clock is up and running now.

I spent alot of time looking for a replacement dial with no luck. Doesn't see to be a common clock dial. Using the picture posted above I used Adobe Illustrator and Solidworks to draw a new dial. After completing the design I had a local print shop print the dial on paper using a lager format printer. I glued the dial to an aluminum face plate. I am pretty happy with the results.

The clock was also missing the pendulum. I decided that since not much else was original to the clock that I would design my own. Using a 10mmOD X 4mm ID quartz rod I fashioned a brass hanger that fit snugly on the end of the tube and epoxied it in place. I machined threaded rod that fit into the 4mm ID with 56 TPI. This was glued into the inside of the tube with epoxy. I then made a knurled brass rating nut to complete the rating assembly.
The bob was fashioned from an 2.750 in aluminum tube with matching end caps. The bottom end cap has tube that extends all the way through the bob. Half way thorough the bob there is a stop. This stop allows the bob to be supported by another quartz tube at its center of mass. This rod slides over the pendulum tube is in contact with the rating nut which allows the bob to be moved up and down to rate the clock.

I call it the "man cave" clock due it its industrial looking design.

The clock it running in my office at work and is keeping great time. It does however need new contacts on the winding motor. Not spring contacts but the contact with the pin. If anybody knows where these can be sourced I would love to hear from you.



Thanks

Rick
 

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Last edited:

jkfabulos

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Aug 21, 2001
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PM me as i have lots of vibrator parts and may have the contacts you need.
 

Dave T

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Dec 8, 2011
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Hi Folks,

Here is an update on my SWCC Model 61. The clock is up and running now.

I spent alot of time looking for a replacement dial with no luck. Doesn't see to be a common clock dial. Using the picture posted above I used Adobe Illustrator and Solidworks to draw a new dial. After completing the design I had a local print shop print the dial on paper using a lager format printer. I glued the dial to an aluminum face plate. I am pretty happy with the results.

The clock was also missing the pendulum. I decided that since not much else was original to the clock that I would design my own. Using a 10mmOD X 4mm ID quartz rod I fashioned a brass hanger that fit snugly on the end of the tube and epoxied it in place. I machined threaded rod that fit into the 4mm ID with 56 TPI. This was glued into the inside of the tube with epoxy. I then made a knurled brass rating nut to complete the rating assembly.
The bob was fashioned from an 2.750 in aluminum tube with matching end caps. The bottom end cap has tube that extends all the way through the bob. Half way thorough the bob there is a stop. This stop allows the bob to be supported by another quartz tube at its center of mass. This rod slides over the pendulum tube is in contact with the rating nut which allows the bob to be moved up and down to rate the clock.

I call it the "man cave" clock due it its industrial looking design.

The clock it running in my office at work and is keeping great time. It does however need new contacts on the winding motor. Not spring contacts but the contact with the pin. If anybody knows where these can be sourced I would love to hear from you.



Thanks

Rick
Fantastic job. Dial looks great and I like the pendulum idea.
 

BLKBEARD

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Nov 15, 2016
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Great Job!!

I'ts great to see you follow the mentality that there's no such word as "can't" in the American Dictionary.
Now that you've done all the leg-work, You can copy right your dial face & sell replacements on ebay. Who knows, You might become more famous than the guy who invented Q-tips.

I any event, I applaud your efforts, going the extra mile to complete your project clock. Nobody except a collector of that particular clock would ever walk into your office and see anything wrong. The rest of the world would walk in and see a nice looking clock hanging on the wall.