Seitz Jewel Gauge Question/Poll

Discussion in 'Watch Repair' started by Cajun72, Jan 10, 2019.

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Should I purchase one @ $100 or more? Is it worth it?

  1. Yes

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  2. No

    1 vote(s)
    100.0%
  1. Cajun72

    Cajun72 Adam

    Jul 24, 2012
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    Hello again ok been looking for a Seitz Jewel gauge. They are elusive so far. Is it worth it to purchase one if you do a pocket watch every now and then? Been practicing on both pocket and wrist watch movements lately with varied success.
    seitz gauge.jpg
     
  2. Chris Radek

    Chris Radek Registered User
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    Apr 13, 2014
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    I assume you mostly want to measure balance pivots. You'd need only a very few jewels to do that, 9-10-11-12 or so. If you have the seitz jeweling set or similar, you could easily get the jewels you need and make a gauge.

    Or, you can carefully use a good metric micrometer under your stereo microscope. If you do it under the microscope it's pretty safe because you can align the staff and tell when the jaws are just touching it, without squeezing. If you do not have both those tools, I suggest you get them before bothering with this very special purpose (single purpose) tool.
     
  3. Cajun72

    Cajun72 Adam

    Jul 24, 2012
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    Thanks, I thought about that as well. But where to find those specific jewels sizes it the problem.
     
  4. gmorse

    gmorse Registered User
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    Jan 7, 2011
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    Seitz jewels are available from most good materials houses in specific sizes, they just aren't particularly cheap.
     
  5. DeweyC

    DeweyC Registered User
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    Feb 5, 2007
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    Graham,

    I have been shocked by what people are willing to pay for these tool sets given full assortments of jewels are very expensive these days and individual jewels go for $12 (I think) from the suppliers.

    I also advise people to make their own pivot gauge for 9/100 to 22/100. Anything over that can be miked with care.

    But even this gauge is limited. Mainly it can be used to size what is needed for a replacement staff. To select a new jewel you either need an assortment of reliably marked jewels or a set of pivot gauges for measuring hole size. I like that people have come up with the idea of using broken staffs of known pivots set into handles as a hole size gauge.

    Just struck me, do we REALLY call the tools for measuring the hole and for measuring the pivot by the same name?

    FWIW, in school they called the Seitz pivot straightener the pivot breaker. The advantage of it is that does have 1/2 size jewels for use as a more accurate pivot guage. But the cost.....
     
  6. gmorse

    gmorse Registered User
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    Jan 7, 2011
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    Hi Dewey,

    Yes, that is an astonishingly expensive little accessory. I picked one up at an auction very cheaply some years ago, but I never use it for its advertised purpose, just as a sizing tool.

    The main sources in the UK for Seitz jewels only sell them in threes, which is a pain.

    Regards,

    Graham
     

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