Seikosha alarm clock, Need help finding out what year and model this is.

Discussion in 'Your Newest Clock Acquisition' started by Jarrett Anzalone, Dec 4, 2019.

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  1. Jarrett Anzalone

    Jarrett Anzalone New Member

    Dec 4, 2019
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    990965E7-2741-41A9-B4EC-D333CF27EFE4.jpeg I have recently acquired a Seikosha Alarm Clock that was boxed up and sent back from Japan somewhere in the 1950’s and has NEVER been used or opened let alone touched since then. No batteries at all, just crank the bank and bam fires up and ticks like a charm. I CANNOT find this anywhere online (which is very odd) any people out there that know of this clock from the time range or what model this is?

    B58A9ED5-E140-4A22-BC07-D0D572353424.jpeg
     
  2. roughbarked

    roughbarked Registered User

    Dec 2, 2016
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    Shame you haven't shown me the back of the clock or with the back off.
     
  3. JTD

    JTD Registered User

    Sep 27, 2005
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    Welcome to the board
    I agree with roughbarked. . Please post photos of the back and also with the back off. Will be much easier to help.

    JTD
     
  4. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Nov 26, 2009
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    I would recommend providing pix of the back.

    I would recommend to NOT take the back off.

    Advising taking things apart with the implied promise that it will provide all answers is a bit of an obsession on the Message Board. Yes, no doubt, that a look @ the movement may often be helpful.

    I think all that will be revealed in this instance is a small poor quality lever movement that resembles its many clones made during that period in the US, Germany and elsewhere. Doubt that you will find the sacred serial # or anything else really useful.

    You have what appears to be a bit of a rare find... though not a valuable one. I believe the rarity of your clock lies in the fact that it appears to me to be “NOS”. New old stock. Undisturbed and literally fresh out of the box with the original package literature & material. Not something to be messed with unless really necessary.

    You have a date when it was sent which is your first clue.

    Stylistically, l would have said it shows an Art Deco influence and would have guessed somewhat earlier. In the’50’s, Japan was still devastated by WW2 & in the midst of a rebuilding that in a couple of decades would make it a world class economic powerhouse.

    Google the jeweler’ name, the maker with different combinations of words, etc. before you start taking things apart and disturb what has for all these years been undisturbed.

    Just my advice FWIW.

    RM
     
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  5. JTD

    JTD Registered User

    Sep 27, 2005
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    The company is still in business (www.nsdo.co.jp).

    JTD
     
  6. Levi Hutchins

    Levi Hutchins Registered User

    Oct 21, 2012
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    You may want to determine if the hands and numbers are phosphorescent or radioluminescent, especially if are considering opening up the clock.

     
  7. roughbarked

    roughbarked Registered User

    Dec 2, 2016
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    It may even be later, ie: 1960's? Very little of such clock and watch production was imported into Australia before the 1970's. We have to remember that there was great opposition to selling Japanese produce in Australia after the war. Most of what Japan produced up until then was sold in the Asian marketplace at the time though some was brought home by those who shopped in Hong Kong as tourists. I recall that the apprentice before me came back and told the shop owner that if he didn't start selling Seiko and Citizen in his shop, he'd be going out of business. This apprentice had worked at the Seiko service centre in Sydney and had returned to the country in 1975.
     
  8. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Nov 26, 2009
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    Interesting history.

    In the US some expressed similar feelings about Japanese & German goods reflecting feelings engendered by WW 2.

    I would go with 1950’s. That’s when it was reportedly shipped. May be in an earlier style as that was what surviving machinery & tooling could produce as factories got up & running again? Like Germany produced basically prewar VW’s at first ??

    I’m now more interested who sent it to the US. Members of the US armed forces stationed in postwar Europe & Japan sent goods home. Just think of all the late cuckoos that were sent home.

    Probably a more interesting story than the “date & ID”.

    RM
     
  9. Jarrett Anzalone

    Jarrett Anzalone New Member

    Dec 4, 2019
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    She was a medic in the army, part of M.A.E.S. She shipped all kinds of random things from fine china all the way to wooden celluloid carvings from Japan in the same time range. There was a tag on one of the wooden crates stating she paid 6$ either to ship it over from Japan or even 6$ for the whole Shabang. That I will not ever know. I believe this watch has never been touched since that time it was put in the box. Inside the actual watch box the packaging contained straw to keep it from bouncing around. Very interesting
     
  10. Uhralt

    Uhralt Registered User
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    Agriculture would probably have stopped the import at the border nowadays......

    Uhralt
     
  11. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    .

    As I suspected.

    Thanks for sharing!

    RM
     

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