Seiko High Beat 16-jewel Mantle Clock Instructions Needed

Les McAlister

NAWCC Member
Dec 16, 2005
23
7
3
HELP!

A customer sent me a clock to repair that I have never seen before. After spending hours on the Internet I have discovered that there is virtually NO information about its history or operation.

I can see that these are quite rare clocks, but someone other there must have a copy of the original instructions or some type of repair manual.

Any assistance will be greatly appreciated.

Lester M. McAlister
SangamoClocks.com

IMG_7138.JPG IMG_7139.JPG IMG_7140.JPG IMG_7141.JPG IMG_7142.JPG
 

Les McAlister

NAWCC Member
Dec 16, 2005
23
7
3
After writing the Seiko museum they were able to translate the Instructions on the back door as noted below.

The details for operating the clock are relatively straight forward. As you have determined the #2 knob is used to adjust the time when pulled towards you. The #3 white lever sets the date.

The red #1 lever starts the clock, you may have to push this a couple of times to get the movement in motion and to allow the clock to begin normal operation.

The red lever at the top #4 is used to reset the seconds hand to the 12 o'clock position. This is recommended to be done only when the hand is between 50 and 10 minute marks at the top of the dial.

The clock does not have a quickset for the day, so this needs to be done manually by advancing the clock between 9pm and 2am, and then back again to advance the day.

When installing batteries lay the clock on a soft cloth to ensure the perspex casing is not scratched, and ensure that the clock is not cleaned with alcohol or petrochemical based products that can damage plastics.
 

Les McAlister

NAWCC Member
Dec 16, 2005
23
7
3
I have determined that the circuit board in the bottom of the case opening is the power supply unit used to convert the 2, D-Cell batteries into whatever voltage is required to power the circuit board on the right side. The right side circuit board has a 4 wire harness that connects directly to the drive motor. I disassembled the movement assembly, cleaned all the plates and jewels and burnished all the pivots, then reassembling the clock. The last task was to disassemble to motor to clean the jewels and lubricate the pivots.....this is where things got bad. The pivots on the rotor were virtually worn off from lack of oil as were the pivots on the adjacent "torque" wheel. These pivots are 0.19mm in diameter and will need to be replaced. Fingers crossed....that will be a job for later this week.

IMG_7422.JPG IMG_7423.JPG IMG_7424.JPG IMG_7425.JPG IMG_7441.JPG IMG_7442.JPG IMG_7443.JPG IMG_7444.JPG IMG_7445.JPG IMG_7446.JPG IMG_7447.JPG IMG_7448.JPG IMG_7449.JPG IMG_7450.JPG IMG_7451.JPG IMG_7452.JPG IMG_7453.JPG
 

Chris Radek

NAWCC Member
Apr 13, 2014
820
337
63
Lincoln, NE, USA
timeguy.com
Country
Les, for my own curiosity would you share some pictures of the circuit board and let us know what frequency the quartz crystal is on yours?

The chronometer model I repaired was dated 1967 on the rating certificate, and had a large quartz in a glass tube and temperature compensation (passive compensation, not an oven, it runs on two D cells!) The correct rate of the quartz is 6269.38888... Hz which gets divided by 3, then 4, 4, & 2 (all discrete circuitry) giving 65.306 Hz. I would assume but did not verify that the motor has the effect of dividing this further by 6 and spins at 10.844 rps. I did not count the train to see why this weird number works out!

I always regret not studying in more detail the cool stuff that passes through my shop, but I have so much to do...
 

Les McAlister

NAWCC Member
Dec 16, 2005
23
7
3
A common problem with 'lectric clocks. They go so well that nobody bothers to get them serviced until they are worn out.
Agreed! The Secticon/Portescap clocks have the same problem with the upper motor pivot. These motors run constantly and once the oil dries out on the jewels..... the wear begins. Swiss ATO balance wheel movements wear the upper balance staff pivot completely off and the clocks will still run.... but not keep good time. Also....you can hear a squeaking noise at times from the movement as the balance rubs on the plastic field coil housing. Neglect is never a good thing for these clocks, but I love bringing them back to life.
 

Les McAlister

NAWCC Member
Dec 16, 2005
23
7
3
Les, for my own curiosity would you share some pictures of the circuit board and let us know what frequency the quartz crystal is on yours?

The chronometer model I repaired was dated 1967 on the rating certificate, and had a large quartz in a glass tube and temperature compensation (passive compensation, not an oven, it runs on two D cells!) The correct rate of the quartz is 6269.38888... Hz which gets divided by 3, then 4, 4, & 2 (all discrete circuitry) giving 65.306 Hz. I would assume but did not verify that the motor has the effect of dividing this further by 6 and spins at 10.844 rps. I did not count the train to see why this weird number works out!

I always regret not studying in more detail the cool stuff that passes through my shop, but I have so much to do...
Chris, I will get additional pictures tomorrow. I successfully replaced all 4 pivots today and just need to adjust the endplay on the rotor pivots before I reinstall the movement. This motor has """"10"""" jewels. The rotor pivots and torque wheel pivots have end caps. I did not notice an enclosed quartz crystal on the circuit board but will take a closer look tomorrow. By looking at the motor wiring I am guessing how they operate. The outer 2 wires going to the motor feed 5 of the 6 field coils in series which impulse the rotor. The 6th coil has 2 separate wires running to it and I think that this coil is used to monitor the RPM of the motor and adjust as necessary to keep precise time. I did not see any rating certificate on this clock, so it may have become detached over the years. More tomorrow......

IMG_7499.JPG
 

Les McAlister

NAWCC Member
Dec 16, 2005
23
7
3
Wow, well done! Do you use a loctite product for those pivots?

I'm surprised your pivots are 19, mine were definitely 24 (on the flywheel).
A friend introduced me to Green Loctite 680. It is made for cylindrical bonding is chemical resistant and can withstand heat up to 180C.

You may be correct about the flywheel pivots. I measured the original pivots close to the arbor where they were not worn, thinking that was an accurate measurement without checking the jewels. Mistake..... I have a soft growling noise in the movement and I am sure it is coming from the flywheel. After your comment.... I am afraid there is excess clearance. I was going to let it run for a few weeks before I went back in and checked/corrected the problem. Moral to this story.... never ASSUME.

The best news..... the customer sold the clock to me :)
 

Forum statistics

Threads
165,005
Messages
1,435,859
Members
85,920
Latest member
Remco
Encyclopedia Pages
1,101
Total wiki contributions
2,873
Last edit
Weekly News 7/7/19 by Tom McIntyre