Second identification question

Discussion in 'European & Other Pocket Watches' started by markk900, Oct 29, 2007.

  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  1. markk900

    markk900 Registered User

    Oct 29, 2007
    11
    0
    0
    Hi again....wanted your collective advice on a second watch in my possession: Marked Wm Stroud London, it shows serial number 7990, and watch papers in the case date it to at least 1852. Can you help date this watch more precisely?

    The hallmark on both inner and outer cases are lion, leopard head with crown, and capital R. There is also an "S C" stamped on the case in normal type, some kind of tiny crown, and a 7 stamped at the bottom of the case.

    Any information about this watch, maker and dates would be most appreciated!

    Mark
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Don Dahlberg

    Don Dahlberg Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Aug 31, 2000
    3,425
    12
    38
    The leopard's head mean London assay. The upper case R of that style is for 1812.

    There are several casemakers that used SC:

    Sarah Clerke of 23 Banner street. Watch cases around 1813-1815 were attributed to Clerke.

    Sarah Caprenter, 9 Islington Road dates about 1791-3.

    Samuel Cuendet, 20 Hyde Street, Bloomsbury and later Wimington Square dates from 1827-49.

    Samuel Crafts, 9 Artillery Street, Bishopsgate Street 1839.

    This information came from a great and inexpensive book "Watch Case Makers of England - A history and register of gold and silver watch case makers of England: 1720-1920" by Philip T. Priestley. You can obtain this from the NAWCC Museum Shop.

    Don
     
  3. markk900

    markk900 Registered User

    Oct 29, 2007
    11
    0
    0
    Excellent information - thank you. I will look into obtaining a copy of the book you mention.

    Anyone heard of the watchmaker, Wm Stroud?

    Mark
     
  4. lofty

    lofty Registered User

    Aug 22, 2005
    350
    0
    16
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    The leopard's head with a crown apeared until 1822. From 1822 onwards, the leopard's head was still used but minus its crown. So the style of the date letter R and the leopard's head with the crown, dates this, as Don has said, to 1812.


    Lofty
     
  5. Jerry Matthews

    Jerry Matthews Registered User

    Sep 20, 2005
    961
    0
    0
    Retired
    Sussex, England
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Mark, the best source for this kind of info is Watchmaklers and Clockmakers of the World by Brian Loomes. Unfortunately, he has no listing for Wm Stroud. I will check out one or two other possible sources and if I find anything I will let you know.

    As regards the other watch, the Thos Tompion. If it is really by him (and I am not qualified to say one way or the other) then you have an extremely valuable piece of horological history. But sadly, because the their rarity, a lot of counterfeits exist.
     
  6. markk900

    markk900 Registered User

    Oct 29, 2007
    11
    0
    0
    Thanks Jerry - I'm looking forward to whatever information you do or don't find. Seems from the case anyway that the Stroud is 1812.

    Also, thank you lofty for confirming the 1812 date.

    Re: the maybe-Tompion: even if its a counterfeit I'm still chuffed - just having a potentially 300+ year old working watch, even a fake celebrity watch - is cool.

    Mark
     
  7. Jerry Matthews

    Jerry Matthews Registered User

    Sep 20, 2005
    961
    0
    0
    Retired
    Sussex, England
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Mark,

    Sorry, I couldn't find anything more on William Stroud.

    About the maybe-Tompion: I know what you mean, it is cool to have something made 200-300 years ago that is still working today and doing the job for which it was made. Think of the gadgets we have around us today---computers, quartz clocks, TVs, DVD players---in less than 20 years they all will have gone for recycling, while an antique clock or watch, if cared for, will go on forever.

    Jerry
     

Share This Page