Second hand revolves in 50 seconds, not 60, on brand new movement

AvatarBob

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I recently bought a brand new Urgos UW03-121F 5-tube movement to replace an Urgos UW03038B 9-tube movement. The new movement arrived with a useable minute hand, an incorrect (too loose) hour hand, and no second hand at all, but all three hands from the old movement fit it well. However, the second hand completes one revolution in 50 (yes, fifty) seconds on the new movement instead of 60 seconds.

The movement is rated for 3600 bph and is keeping pretty good time, with 60 pendulum swings per minute as expected. The second hand advances with every pendulum swing, as expected. But it only takes 50 pendulum swings for the second hand to make a full revolution. It looks like the second hand is jumping ahead more than 1 second on alternate pendulum swings (i.e., with every swing to the right.)

Is this a common occurrence? Maybe this movement isn't supposed to have a second hand on it, even though my old second hand seems to fit it well and the post for it is exactly aligned on my old dial? What am I missing?

Thanks in advance for any insights or advice.
 

Tim Orr

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Good afternoon, Bob!

Many old "Viennas" had what looked like a "seconds" hand that completed its revolution in less than 60 seconds. Yours isn't a Vienna, of course, but I'm betting the principle is the same.

It was completely normal. If the clock is keeping good time, I don't think it's anything to worry about. "C'est normal," as the French waiter said when delivering a glass of beer full of floating sediment.

Best regards!

Tim Orr
 
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Willie X

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Interesting ... Never seen that myself, maybe it's something new! Ha. The ill fitting hands, I've seen plenty of those.
Willie X
 

bruce linde

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wait... if this is a 3600 bph movement it should take 60 seconds for the second hand to go around... and require a (roughly) one-meter pendulum.

yes, vienna regulators can have seconds bits that take 45 seconds to go around... but the OP also said "It looks like the second hand is jumping ahead more than 1 second on alternate pendulum swings (i.e., with every swing to the right.)"... which means something is messed up.

please take video of the escapement in action so we can see the escape wheel teeth hitting the entry and exit pallets, post the video to youtube, and then copy and paste the url of the video here so we can see what you're seeing.

the locks and drops should be even on both sides... sounds to me like the verge adjustment needs to be tweaked.
 

Uhralt

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wait... if this is a 3600 bph movement it should take 60 seconds for the second hand to go around... and require a (roughly) one-meter pendulum.

yes, vienna regulators can have seconds bits that take 45 seconds to go around... but the OP also said "It looks like the second hand is jumping ahead more than 1 second on alternate pendulum swings (i.e., with every swing to the right.)"... which means something is messed up.

please take video of the escapement in action so we can see the escape wheel teeth hitting the entry and exit pallets, post the video to youtube, and then copy and paste the url of the video here so we can see what you're seeing.

the locks and drops should be even on both sides... sounds to me like the verge adjustment needs to be tweaked.
If the clock has a seconds pendulum with a length of about 1 meter AND keeps time, then the seconds hands problem should not be related to the escapement. My guess is that the seconds hand is somewhat loose on its arbor and slides a bit forward each time the escapement stops the escape wheel abruptly. Uptake of speed of the escape wheel is more gradual, with less slippage involved.

Uhralt
 

bruce linde

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the OP says the clock is keeping good time and that the second hand takes 50 clicks to complete one revolution... which means that the escape wheel / verge interaction is skipping approx. 10 ticks per minute. again, you (and then we) need to watch carefully to verify that skipping is happening, and readjust spacing between verge and escape wheel.
 

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If the second hand is on an extension of the escapewheel arbor and the escape wheel has 30 teeth, and it is beating 3600 BPH, ..... there's more to the story.

Ralph
 

Willie X

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A high dollar clock (like that one) should have whatever is necessary to give a true 60 second sweep. They made quite a few 100cm pendulum movements but I'm not sure they used those with the tube bell version. It was the same movement, except for the pendulum length.

I also though this bell movement was out of production. Where's Mark?

Willie X
 

AvatarBob

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Thanks for the help, everyone. I've made a video of the issue itself, but not the escapement, etc., yet because it will take a little time to get the movement back out of the case.

Here's the video's link:

Upon closer examination, I'm no longer sure that the second hand is advancing more on one side of the pendulum swing than the other, just that the hand seems to move 6 seconds for every 5 pendulum swings. The pendulum isn't visible in the video, but the ticking is clearly audible.

Please let me know if more videos or information might be helpful.

Newbie question: Does Hermle/Urgos manufacturer technical support exist? I haven't had much luck finding any contact information through Google, just support offered by the vendors. I did contact my vendor first and they hadn't heard of this issue before, and I thought I'd try here first to see if it's a problem or intended functioning before pressing the matter.
 
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MARK A. BUTTERWORTH

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Since it is a 3600 bph unit, the seconds hand should advance one revolution per minute if it attached directly to the escape wheel. This is still a production unit. I am trying to see from the picture if the seconds hand is attached to the escape wheel or some offset, but that is not clear to me. The other question is, how exact is the timing of the clock? How many minutes a day is it gaining?
 

AvatarBob

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I'd estimate it's gaining 5 to 10 minutes per day. It's only been running for a couple of days, and I've been lowering the pendulum a little each time I see it has gained a noticeable amount, usually a fraction of a minute after a few hours. That's how I noticed the problem, actually: I was trying to use the position of the second hand to see how much time had been gained, and I was getting crazy and inconsistent readings from that.

Here's a video that shows the second hand and what is behind it. The pin roller(?) is kind of in the way for positioning the camera, so please let me know if I need to focus in on something more, or get a different angle.


Thanks!
 

MuseChaser

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After watching the first video, it doesn't appear that the second hand is doing any skipping.. it just moves a tiny bit farther than one second marking on the dial for each tick.. looks like twelve ticks per 15 seconds worth of markings, which would work out to 48 ticks per 360 degree revolution around the seconds dial. Is it possible that whatever wheel is driving the second hand is the wrong one, and has too few teeth?
 

AvatarBob

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That was my thinking, too. I can't think of what else would convert 60 beats to 50 beats, if the hand is moving smoothly and consistently like it is. But I know almost nothing about the inner workings, so I ran to the experts here when the seller didn't have a quick answer.
 

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You never answered whether the second hand was on an extended arbor of the escape wheel, or if the escape wheel had 30 teeth. Regardless, searchoing Google, I saw an absratct in the search result that said there is not seconds bit feature on the Urgos UW03121 movement. The link itself was dead.

Ralph
 

AvatarBob

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You never answered whether the second hand was on an extended arbor of the escape wheel, or if the escape wheel had 30 teeth. Regardless, searchoing Google, I saw an absratct in the search result that said there is not seconds bit feature on the Urgos UW03121 movement. The link itself was dead.

Ralph
Sorry, Ralph. I didn't know the answer to the question about the extended arbor and the teeth count (I am mostly clueless), and I hoped that the videos might answer it. I have very little knowledge about movements and their parts, which is why I went with a factory fresh movement when my old and well-worn movement developed non-trivial problems.

But the information about the lack of a seconds bit is very enlightening; thank you. I didn't think that would be the case, since it almost seems that it would be extra work to change the 60 beats from the pendulum--especially when the Urgos 9-tube UW03038, which superficially seems very similar, did have a true second hand. But this is exactly the kind of information I had hoped to get here, so thank you very much. Your Googling skills are better than mine.
 

Willie X

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That clock has an auxiliary second hand shaft drive. I would guess your clock left the factory with the wrong gear set in the auxiliary drive. That's about all it could be. You have a second beater there, with probably the gear reduction needed for the 100cm pendulum.

The German clock company/s seem to have a hard time 'getting their act together' in the past 10 years or so. :(

Willie X
 
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Ralph

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FWIF, this is the abstract I saw... I wouldn't take it for the final word. Didn't you get a manual with the movement?
"
Urgos clock manual
http://sc2a-aviconseil.com › tango-card-xtuik › urgos-cl...

Results 1 - 30 of 30 — Technology has Acces PDF Urgos Clock Manual Urgos Clock Manual ... Movt Pdl Length 114cm - Westminster Chime - Drive type chain - Does not have Sec Hand Feat. ... E. Replaces Urgos movements marked UW03121. ... This is a video showing the ins and outs of a Howard Miller tubular grandfather ..."

Ralph
 

Willie X

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I've never seen a "manual" shiped with a clock movement. Just a cardboard box, that's about it.

I have seen a few note tags like: use new (enclosed) hands, don't overtighten the hold down screws, etc.

Willie X
 

AvatarBob

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That clock has an auxiliary second hand shaft drive. I would guess your clock left the factory with the wrong gear set in the auxiliary drive. That's about all it could be. You have a second beater there, with probably the gear reduction needed for the 100cm pendulum.

The German clock company/s seem to have a hard time 'getting their act together' in the past 10 years or so. :(

Willie X
That seems to make sense. The relationship between the period for a 100cm pendulum and for a 116cm pendulum is close to 50/60, so gearing for a 100cm pendulum that was mixed into gearing for a 116cm pendulum seems like it could result in one rotation in 100/116 of a minute instead of exactly one minute. My count of 50 seconds for one revolution was just an estimate from counting ticks.

FWIF, this is the abstract I saw... I wouldn't take it for the final word. Didn't you get a manual with the movement?
"
Urgos clock manual
http://sc2a-aviconseil.com › tango-card-xtuik › urgos-cl...

Results 1 - 30 of 30 — Technology has Acces PDF Urgos Clock Manual Urgos Clock Manual ... Movt Pdl Length 114cm - Westminster Chime - Drive type chain - Does not have Sec Hand Feat. ... E. Replaces Urgos movements marked UW03121. ... This is a video showing the ins and outs of a Howard Miller tubular grandfather ..."

Ralph
Thanks, Ralph. No, I didn't receive a manual, which surprised and disappointed me. I'm glad to hear that such manuals might exist. If only I could find one!

Regarding the abstract, I see "Drive type chain" mentioned, and the 03121 is cable-driven. It looks like the movement from the abstract is listed as a replacement for Urgos UW03121, but maybe it's not the 03121 itself? Am I reading that right?
 

AvatarBob

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I've never seen a "manual" shiped with a clock movement. Just a cardboard box, that's about it.

I have seen a few note tags like: use new (enclosed) hands, don't overtighten the hold down screws, etc.

Willie X
Bah, that's what I feared. That seems crazy to me. Buy something relatively simple from Home Depot or Ikea or someplace and you get some kind of manual. Buy a complex piece of technology like these movements and get nothing? Maybe they figure (incorrectly in my case) that if you're confident enough to buy it, you must already know enough about it. :p
 

Willie X

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Continuation of post #19,

If your escape wheel is turning nicely at
1 RPM then the auxiliary drive gearing HAS to be 1 : 1. That is, the tiny gears should have the same number of teeth. It will take good magnification to actually count the teeth but the diameters should also be the same and easy to measure, if you have a verneer micrometer.

3857 is the BPH on the 100cm pendulum

Willie X
 

doc_fields

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Continuation of post #19,

If your escape wheel is turning nicely at
1 RPM then the auxiliary drive gearing HAS to be 1 : 1. That is, the tiny gears should have the same number of teeth. It will take good magnification to actually count the teeth but the diameters should also be the same and easy to measure, if you have a verneer micrometer.

3857 is the BPH on the 100cm pendulum

Willie X
Hermle used to put a thin wire spring that laid against the second hand shaft as it comes through the front plate. It's purpose was to keep slight pressure against the second hand shaft to keep it from walking forward between beats, IF I remember correctly. I could be wrong...............gary
 

AvatarBob

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Continuation of post #19,

If your escape wheel is turning nicely at
1 RPM then the auxiliary drive gearing HAS to be 1 : 1. That is, the tiny gears should have the same number of teeth. It will take good magnification to actually count the teeth but the diameters should also be the same and easy to measure, if you have a verneer micrometer.

3857 is the BPH on the 100cm pendulum

Willie X
IMG_2506.JPG

Hi, Willie. The escape wheel has 30 teeth and is turning at 1 RPM. And on the front plate, there is definitely a direct-drive gear that is on the shaft that passes through the escape wheel and then through the front plate. The gear for the second hand is above that gear and meshes with it, as you said. The lower (escape axle) gear has 36 teeth and is slightly larger than the second hand gear, which I think has 30 teeth. I can't see the whole upper, second-hand gear at once to count the teeth, but I think there are 15 teeth on one-half of the gear, although it's hard to determine whether I'm actually counting on exactly half of the gear. A picture of the two meshed gears is included here.

Unfortunately, all of this seems to be true on my old 03038 movement also, which also takes a 116cm pendulum, runs at 3600 bph, and whose second hand did reliably take 60 seconds for a revolution. I was hoping to spot some differences between the two movements' gears that would account for the difference in second-hand revolution times, but I don't see any. However, I don't have a vernier micrometer to measure the gear sizes accurately enough to find small differences, and the only teeth count in which I'm confident are the 36 teeth on the lower (escape axle) gear on each movement.

Hermle used to put a thin wire spring that laid against the second hand shaft as it comes through the front plate. It's purpose was to keep slight pressure against the second hand shaft to keep it from walking forward between beats, IF I remember correctly. I could be wrong...............gary
Thanks, Gary. I don't see a spring like that, but I keep seeing new things. If I see something later that looks like that, I'll post about it.

The vendor from whom I bought the movement is contacting the manufacturer to see what they recommend, for which I'm grateful. I'll share here any information I get from that. If anyone has any more thoughts to post here, I'd still like to hear them, but I'm no longer desperate. Thanks, everyone!
 

MuseChaser

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Just thinking out loud here, and I could be wrong, but.....

A 36-toothed gear on the escape arbor turning one full revolution/36 teeth per minute...60 seconds....

...is turning a 30-toothed gear on the second hand arbor...

...which would complete its full 360 degree revolution after only 30 of the 36 teeth on the escape pinion have advanced...so six teeth early...

If we scale that up from 30 teeth to 60 seconds, that six teeth early becomes 12 seconds early, or 48 seconds/ticks showing in one revolution of the second hand.....which is exactly what we're seeing, no?

Sure seems like that 36-toothed gear needs to be a 30.
 

R. Croswell

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My H. Endler is the same way. It drove me crazy after I rebuilt it when I was using the "seconds" hand to get a rough initial setup. It was showing one revolution of the seconds hand each minute but the minute hand was way off after an hour. The pendulum is not a full length seconds beating pendulum so the seconds bit is mostly a decoration that serves no useful purpose except to show that the escapement is working. There is a lot of information here and elsewhere online attempting to explain why so many clocks were made this way. Some of the stories are interesting even if ridiculous, but the bottom line is that this is the way they were made and the seconds hands never did, and never were expected to "keep time". Don't try to fix it, it ain't broke.

RC
 

Uhralt

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Just thinking out loud here, and I could be wrong, but.....

A 36-toothed gear on the escape arbor turning one full revolution/36 teeth per minute...60 seconds....

...is turning a 30-toothed gear on the second hand arbor...

...which would complete its full 360 degree revolution after only 30 of the 36 teeth on the escape pinion have advanced...so six teeth early...

If we scale that up from 30 teeth to 60 seconds, that six teeth early becomes 12 seconds early, or 48 seconds/ticks showing in one revolution of the second hand.....which is exactly what we're seeing, no?

Sure seems like that 36-toothed gear needs to be a 30.
Or the 30 teeth wheel needs to be a 36. From the picture it looks like the meshing is very shallow, with the larger 36 teeth wheel meshing would be deeper.

Uhralt
 

Willie X

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The depthing on those two little gears is way way shallow. I would bet your clock simply needs the correct auxiliary drive bracket (one with 36 teeth) a 1 : 1 ratio as already mentioned. Willie X
 
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MuseChaser

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My H. Endler is the same way. It drove me crazy after I rebuilt it when I was using the "seconds" hand to get a rough initial setup. It was showing one revolution of the seconds hand each minute but the minute hand was way off after an hour. The pendulum is not a full length seconds beating pendulum so the seconds bit is mostly a decoration that serves no useful purpose except to show that the escapement is working. There is a lot of information here and elsewhere online attempting to explain why so many clocks were made this way. Some of the stories are interesting even if ridiculous, but the bottom line is that this is the way they were made and the seconds hands never did, and never were expected to "keep time". Don't try to fix it, it ain't broke.

RC
Fascinating! Now you've got me curious. The only (mechanical) clock I have with an auxiliary second hand is 1990s era Howard Miller triple chime grandfather with Kieninger MSU 02-116 movement. I always assumed the second hand was an actual second hand... going to go check...

... back again. It is an actual second hand on this clock.

Or the 30 teeth wheel needs to be a 36. From the picture it looks like the meshing is very shallow, with the larger 36 teeth wheel meshing would be deeper.

Uhralt
I suggested the 30 tooth gear without taking the depthing into account.. I didn't notice it, but I'm the resident bull-in-the-clockshop newbie. Also, and in hindsight probably erroneously, I thought although either solution (replace the 30 with a 36, or the 36 with a 30) would achieve the goal of one 360 degree rotation of the second hand in 60 seconds, the pair of 30-teeth gears would align the second hand stop motions with the seconds markings on the dial better. I guess, though, those stops would be driven by the escape regardless of how many teeth are involved. Still learning...
 
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wow

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Ok. Another query, as New would say, what about the valleys? If there are 30 teeth, wouldn’t there have to be 30 valleys on the second gear to make them travel the same distance? A gear with 30 teeth has 29 valleys right? So would two 30 tooth wheels make the same revolutions? I need to get to work and quit thinking about this. :???:??
 

MARK A. BUTTERWORTH

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The gear that attaches to the escape wheel and the auxiliary gear that measures with that need to have the same and number of teeth. If they do not it would account for that problem. My guess is that those two gears were for 100 cm movements, and will put on by accident.Or maybe that’s all they had available at the factory.
 

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shutterbug

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I ignore the seconds bit and adjust the pendulum to the proper number of beats the movement was designed for. It's easier that way.
 

AvatarBob

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Thanks to everyone who has chimed in here (no pun intended.) Here's the response from Hermle that was forwarded to me by the vendor: "There is nothing wrong with your customers movement, they do not get 60 seconds per rotation, the only Hermle mvt that does that is an 1161/114cm. We checked a few here and are counting 53 to 54 , but the mvt is not geared wrong, the second hand is correct ."

That really surprises me, since the assembly for the would-be second hand seems to be identical to that on my old 03038 movement, which does have a 60-second sweep, but it's tough to argue with the manufacturer. If I ever get to the point where I'm comfortable disassembling and reassembling movements, maybe I'll try swapping some gears to see if I can get it to make a 60-second sweep. But I'm not going to mess with my factory-fresh movement now, so I guess that's the end of it.
 

Willie X

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I wouldn't let them off the hook. This type of snow job, you're getting, is very common these days. All they understand is money. If they see the lawyers coming, only then will they make good on their mistakes.

The law varies some but anyone in commerce usually has but three choices, replace the product, repair the product to the customers satisfaction, or refund the money paid. Simple as that ...

If that purchase was on a charge card, that will place you in a much better position.

With the depthing in that last photo your "factory fresh" clock could stop at any time.

You will need to tell your dealer 'flat out' that this clock is a "new defective" (wording is important) and you want it replaced, or repaired, or a full refund (including shipping) ... your choice.

I'm out on this one, good luck and please don't cave.

Willie X
 
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MARK A. BUTTERWORTH

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The issue in my opinion is not at the movement itself is misgeared, which it is not. The issue is that one of the two small gears on the front are not correct for that movement . If you transfer them over from the other momentThat should correct the problem.
 
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AvatarBob

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With the depthing in that last photo your "factory fresh" clock could stop at any time.
Willie, I know you said you're out of this, and I appreciate the input. But I'm going to ask, do you see a danger that the timekeeping itself could stop, or just the "second" (bitter laugh) hand, from the incorrect depthing?

There's no way I'm going to put something that looks like a second hand on an arbor that rotates every 50 seconds (no offense to the fans of clocks where something like that is an intended feature). So if I'm stuck with this movement in my clock, it won't have a second hand on it, and I'll live with that. Nothing in the description for the 03121 movement promised a second hand, and I can't find any documentation which says it has one, which weakens my argument for a return, I expect--although I was expecting a second hand, based on the structural similarity to my 03038 and the presence of a second- hand arbor in the appropriate spot in the pictures of the 03121. But if the movement is likely to stop running altogether because of the incorrect depthing you see in my photo, that's a whole different story.

Is it likely to jam, which seems would stop the escapement, or is it just likely to become disengaged, which seems would just stop the would-be second hand?

The issue is that one of the two small gears on the front are not correct for that movement . If you transfer them over from the other momentThat should correct the problem.
Mark, thanks for this. That seems to make the most sense to me, after digging more into what drives the second hand and comparing it to the true-second 03038 movement, prompted by the comments and questions in this thread. I doubt I'll try changing the gears, but it's good to have a pretty good idea of the problem.
 

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I have several clocks with seconds hands, and frankly never notice them unless they aren't moving. They are clock bling in MHO :)
 

Steveo7

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My new Hermle built 03083 does the same thing.
Sorry I didn't pick up on this post a few days earlier. My clock had the same original movement (Urgos W38038B) as the OPs original movement. A few weeks ago, I replaced my movement with a new Hermle built Urgos 03083 (due to a badly worn escape wheel). It uses a 116 CM pendulum. My clock exhibits the very same behavior on the second hand. It takes (as near as I measure) 50 seconds to complete one revolution. Still fine tuning the pendulum length but I am only gaining 1 minute in 4 days. Since the clock is keeping good time, I had not attempted to diagnose the reason for the second hand discrepancy. But it does seem that Hermle may be using an incorrect ratio between the escape wheel shaft and the auxiliary second hand shaft.
Steve
 
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MuseChaser

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I have several clocks with seconds hands, and frankly never notice them unless they aren't moving. They are clock bling in MHO :)
I understand the sentiment, and yes, we don't typically use our older mechanical clocks for stop-watch, to-the-second precision timing... but they ARE called second hands, not "motion indicator hands.".... ;)
 

AvatarBob

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My new Hermle built 03083 does the same thing.
Sorry I didn't pick up on this post a few days earlier. My clock had the same original movement (Urgos W38038B) as the OPs original movement. A few weeks ago, I replaced my movement with a new Hermle built Urgos 03083 (due to a badly worn escape wheel). It uses a 116 CM pendulum. My clock exhibits the very same behavior on the second hand. It takes (as near as I measure) 50 seconds to complete one revolution. Still fine tuning the pendulum length but I am only gaining 1 minute in 4 days. Since the clock is keeping good time, I had not attempted to diagnose the reason for the second hand discrepancy. But it does seem that Hermle may be using an incorrect ratio between the escape wheel shaft and the auxiliary second hand shaft.
Steve
Steve, thanks for sharing this. Sorry that you're having the problem, too, but I'm glad for the confirmation that it's not something I did. It's too bad that it seems to be hit-or-miss about whether a replacement movement would be any better, however. :(

I did remove and then re-install (to test on the old movement whether I messed up anything in the process) what seems to be the offending gear, which is shown here. It's held in place on my 03038 movement by an assembly on the front that is attached by just two screws. The end nearer to the gear fits into a small whole in the front plate, and the second hand slips onto the long end with a friction fit. The gear has 30 teeth and I measure it as 6.5mm in diameter. I measure the whole piece as 25mm long, with the long piece after the gear as 20mm. I'd like to buy a brand new version of it to install in the new movement instead of installing the well-worn one that was in the old movement. Does anyone know what this piece is called, when I'm searching for part names? Thanks.

IMG_2545.JPG IMG_2546.JPG
 

bikerclockguy

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Good afternoon, Bob!

Many old "Viennas" had what looked like a "seconds" hand that completed its revolution in less than 60 seconds. Yours isn't a Vienna, of course, but I'm betting the principle is the same.

It was completely normal. If the clock is keeping good time, I don't think it's anything to worry about. "C'est normal," as the French waiter said when delivering a glass of beer full of floating sediment.

Best regards!

Tim Orr
Was that a Schlitz beer, by any chance?:D
 

Tim Orr

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Good evening, Biker!

It was close to half a century ago, but I am betting it was either a local brew, or perhaps a Kronenbourg (The beer of Alsace).

Best regards!

Tim
 

bikerclockguy

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Good evening, Biker!

It was close to half a century ago, but I am betting it was either a local brew, or perhaps a Kronenbourg (The beer of Alsace).

Best regards!

Tim
Not to get too much off topic so as to get red-flagged, but since you mentioned Alsace, I had to add this last comment. If you are ever within 50 miles of Great Falls, VA, there’s an outstanding Alsatian restaurant there called L’Auberge Chez Francois. Bon appetit, and enjoy the rest of your weekend!
 

RJSoftware

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Using an additional nut below the rating nut helps to fine tune the pendulum. So, you set the rating nut below bob a few turns higher/faster and then regulate finer time keeping running extra nu up/down spare thread below. The more idealistic is to thread a lead sinker which is easily done with split lead and compress with pliers with rod tucked in lead crack. Twist it and the lead is compliant enough to make threads. Or regular lead weight with large enough hole force thread excess bob rod/thread into. You can also melt solder into ball or disc and drill that. Paint black etc...

A regular nut would work but one more substantial is better. Less tweaking.

Why this works well is because the closer more demanding you regulate the harder it gets into fractions of a turn. The extra weight being separate and smaller has less effect with more turns. Plus lowering the rating nut can be disastrous as many pendulum bobs dont always slide down especially with fractional turn of rating nut. The tendency is to force/pull bob portion down and sometimes break delicate suspension.
 
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shutterbug

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You will need the same number of teeth on the driving gear from the escape wheel and the mating gear on the seconds bit. If they are different, you'll never have a seconds count that is correct. I'm guessing you have a larger gear driving a smaller one.
 

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