Schwebeanker Clock

mattg85

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May 24, 2012
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Hi, I inherited this clock and know nothing about it. It says Schwebeanker, but I've never heard of the maker and I can't seem to find much info online. I'd like to know the time period when this clock was made, how rare or common it may be, and if I should try winding it up (it hasn't been wound in 20+ years). Thanks in advance for any information.
 

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harold bain

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Hi, Matt, welcome to the message board. The name on your clock is not one I'm familiar with. The clock may date from the 1930's or maybe the 1950's. If you could post a picture of the clock's movement through the back door, and tell us anything stamped on it, we may be able to narrow that down.
 

doug sinclair

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Betcha that's SCHMECKENBECKER! I associate that name mostly with weight driven wall clocks, but it could also apply to other types of clocks.
 

Willie X

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I think that the spelling will be more like Doug's rendition. Your clock is a very common style, often called a German chime clock. I would guess that yours was made in the late 50s or early 60s. S-------------------er was an export company like Welby (sp) and others, they wholesaled all types of clocks all over the world in large numbers.

It would be OK to wind up your clock and see what happens. It would not be OK to put it back into every day service without a good check over. What needs to be done would depend on what condition the movement is in. Could have been stored in a closet for 50 years (best case). Could have been used for 40 years with no service and given to a bunch of ADHD kids with screw-drivers (worst case).

For there size these clocks have a very good sound. If it has a pendulum, that is a plus. If it has a balance wheel escapement, many of them are not repairable or replaceable ...

Good luck, Willie X
 

Burkhard Rasch

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Schwebeanker is the german word for "floating ballance",it´s not maker´s name.Maybe it´s a Hettich mvmt. since they invented this device and-when new-were verry proud of it and marked it on the dial.HTH
Burkhard
 

Steven Thornberry

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I have a similar one with Hermle Schwebeanker on the dial. It has (take a guess) a Hermle movement (pre-dimpled). Perhaps this too is a Hermle?
 

doug sinclair

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Thanks to Burkhard for the definition of "floating balance". The extent of my German is Keininger und Obergfell, Hermle, Junghans, Schmeckenbecker, Lenzkirk, Uhrenfabrik, and a few other clockmaker's names. But I guess you could say my assumption might be considered a reasonable one? Oh yes! And wiener schnitzel, strudel, sauerbraten, liverwurst, bratwurst, and other German words I am indeed more familiar with!:excited:
 

Burkhard Rasch

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anyway,the second list is a good starting point to learn what realy matters over here :)
Burkhard
 

trotterclocks

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May 22, 2012
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Oh my, I forgot the main thing:
The tradename "Schwebeanker" was used by Blesch & Hettich, Ludwigshafen.
In business from 1949 to 1984.
The word schwebeanker means floating anchor and as quite correctly you say "Schwebeanker" was used by Blesch & Hettich, Ludwigshafen. The one I am working on has has a pre dimple FHS , Franz Hermle & Son bim bam strike movement fitted.
 

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