Schatz Elexacta

Discussion in 'Electric Horology' started by petevig, Oct 28, 2014.

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  1. petevig

    petevig Registered User

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    #1 petevig, Oct 28, 2014
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2014
    I recently purchased one of these clocks and have been struggling to get it working. I was fortunate in that nearly everything was there, including the wall mount, the tips and the cups. The only thing out of order was a jury-rigged fishing weight with a slotted piece of brass soldered to the bottom to replace the original disc pendulum. I will make a replacement based on the information found on this site, probably fender washers since the measurements provided for the original do not match my movement (the length is too long).

    The little solenoid is working properly, and I can get it it to swing and stay in beat for maybe one or two cycles. There after, the escape wheel fails to advance, and it slowly comes to a halt.

    I have partially disassembled the movement, and can see where someone has done some sort of pivot repair to the gear that engages the escapement wheel. I believe that in and of itself is most likely causing a bind.

    Before I disassemble any further I am hoping for some guidance and things to look out for. I do not intend to mess with the hairspring, if at all possible, and i am concerned about the two spring loaded pawls that drive the winding wheel. It looks as though the upper assembly can be lifted off to get at the repaired gear without too much effort. I would then send to Mr. Labounty for a proper repair.

    Here is the clock and pictures of the movement areas in question. The last pic shows the repaired gear, which can be seen with a white wad of (:???:) wrapped around the arbor above the gear. Thanks in advance.

    Schatz Elexacto Swing_02.jpg Schatz Elexacto Swing_04.jpg IMG_3493.jpg IMG_3489.jpg IMG_3490.jpg IMG_3425.jpg
     

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  2. flynwill

    flynwill Registered User
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    There isn't any "hairspring"... The spiral spring you see is the mainspring.

    Your clock is quite a bit different from the one I worked on so can't say if you will run into any surprises. Yours is what is known as the "Queen Anne".

    I would start by removing the movement from the plastic case. That is the 3 screws with the rubber grommets under them, plus you may find it easier to remove the bracket that goes down the the battery, and the solenoid first. (The solenoid is held by two screws from the back side.)

    From there I'm less certain, but I would guess that you need to remove the two jack screws that hold the crutch bridge in place. Your clock is different in that the mainspring appears to be pinned to this bridge, so at the very least the mainspring and the wheel that the solenoid acts against will come away with the crutch bridge. If you want to further disassemble that bit for cleaning you will need to unpin the tapered pin holding the mainspring. Note that in putting it back together the mainspring needs to have a certain amount of pre-load, on the one I worked on I ended up adjusting that by turning the collet at the center of the mainspring.

    The actual going works should be pretty straightforward. On the one I worked on the center wheel was permanently fixed to the mainplate by pinions on both sides.

    Good luck and let us know what you find!
     
  3. petevig

    petevig Registered User

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    #3 petevig, Dec 19, 2014
    Last edited: Dec 19, 2014
    Well its been awhile now and so far the clock is working very well after a great repair from Mr. Labounty, who was able to re-pivot the wheel after the EW and install a new bushing. Here is what someone came up with as a "fix" or "repair", probably not a very good description. The first pic is with the "repair", the second pic is without.
    IMG_3511a.jpg IMG_3512a.jpg


    It was actually much easier to disassemble that I expected, although I did not touch the mainspring or the little pawls that do the work by providing power to the time train.

    Here is the top assembly with the mainspring and one of the winding pawls.
    IMG_3504a.jpg

    And the second plate that holds the EW, the anchor pallet, and three wheels that I do not know the correct clock nomenclature for, including the one repaired and the other winding pawl. The plate itself was removed and sent to Mr. Labounty for re-bush with the new pivot. The actual pivot hole is behind the pawl and is not visible.

    IMG_3505a.jpg
    Aside from the pivot repair, it was also necessary to fashion a new pendulum, which turned into a lot of trial and error and is the primary reason I am posting 1 1/2 months after the repair was complete and the clock re-assembled.
    I owe a lot of thanks to the forum here for ideas and experience on what the pendulum should look like, weight and other little tricks. In the end, I got the battery weight close to what is the original battery weight, but still found it necessary to add weight at the top, and additional weight below the pendulum weight and a small torpedo fishing weight in the lower left corner next to the movement.
    (All I know is it works with and doesn't without it.)
    The pendulum is made of fender washers (from a forum picture) clamped around a large re-bent paper clip with a hook at the top and an elongated loop beneath to go over the verge pin, and finished with a coat of black paint. The battery is a "C" cell and was stacked washer on either side to get the correct length and ensure it is centered correctly.

    DSC_0019a.jpg DSC_0020a.jpg
     
  4. dAz57

    dAz57 Registered User

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    Glad you got it working, however I would suggest you use the original D size battery, they used carbon batteries to start with, when alkaline batteries became more common Schatz supplied a thinner adjustment weight since the alkaline battery is heavier, be easy enough to turn up a new one in brass, set the pendulum adjustments to the middle, then just shave weight off it until the clock runs to time.
     
  5. petevig

    petevig Registered User

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    Thank you, I will give it try.
     
  6. Burkhard Rasch

    Burkhard Rasch Registered User
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    these can provide hard nuts to crack,but You got it!Congrats!
    Burkhard
     
  7. flynwill

    flynwill Registered User
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    Glad to hear you got it running!

    For the one I was working on I fabricated a C-cell to D-cell adapter out of a PVC pipe fitting and a cap & brass conductor I fabricated (see pictures). But swapping the adjustment weight for a thinner one as dAz57 suggests sounds like a good fix for that as well. A modern alkaline D-cell will last about twice as long.
     

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  8. petevig

    petevig Registered User

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    #8 petevig, Dec 20, 2014
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2014
    Thank flywill. I saw something very similar on Amazon, but held off until I got it working properly. During my trials and tribulations, I also took great pains to ensure all the weight added (including the battery) was as close to center as possible.

    I am currently waiting on delivery of another one, fortunately, there is no weight involved, but it is missing the base and pivot cups, and also uses (I think) a magnet (or slug of steel) embedded in the base that a coil in the electronics passes over to impart the swing. Perhaps Burkhard has one similar in his collection and can provide some guidance.
    Here is the clock and the electronics.
    Schatz Swing Wood_01.JPG Schatz Swing Wood_06.JPG

    While I am trying to get this one to work, I will likely experiment with adjusting and re-distributing the weights on the Queen Anne.
     
  9. Burkhard Rasch

    Burkhard Rasch Registered User
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    #9 Burkhard Rasch, Dec 20, 2014
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 31, 2017
    sorry I don't have that type,because the swinging of the clock has nothing to do with timekeeping,it's just"for show".It's an electromagnetic swinging circuit,comparable to ATO-swingers or the like,time keeping is provided by a quarzmvmt.,I´m not interested in quarz clocks-
    Burkhard
     
  10. Kevin W.

    Kevin W. Registered User
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    Glad to see yours is running now. I have one i may go back to one day and see what i can do to it , to make it run. Mine is a Queen Anne as well.
     

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