American Sangamo Electric Clock movement ID

Discussion in 'Electric Horology' started by garyg, Nov 1, 2019.

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  1. garyg

    garyg Registered User

    Feb 2, 2007
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    Cannot find anything on this Old movement. Appears some type of time, or timing clock.
    Any help or info on ID appreciated.
    Thanks in advance

    36366D2B-667C-4081-B774-54B077A03C24.jpeg 9C5195CF-AAD1-484B-8239-F03ED8ED48B5.jpeg 634CFD4F-7B86-4272-89CA-7C41730BA8A4.jpeg B8046035-B14E-4E6B-A6FF-2B666B7207E4.jpeg
     
  2. Les McAlister

    Les McAlister Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Dec 16, 2005
    5
    1
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    What you have are the remains of a Sangamo Type "T" timer which was their top of the line model. This movement was originally housed in a cast iron case which had a glass window for viewing the time wheel. The main feature of this timer was that it incorporated a Sangamo electrically wound movement so that when the power to the timer failed, the movement would continue to run for up to 24 hours. These were installed in areas that were difficult to access making it unnecessary to reset the clock movement after a power failure...unless the failure lasted longer than 24 hours. The other unique feature was that there we no contact points, but (one or more) mercury tube that would be tilted by the movement when the trip pins mounted in the time wheel would pass by the levers at the lower left hand corner of the movement. The little thumb screw in the middle of the time wheel can be removed and then the dial lifted early off the mounting shaft. Under the dial you will find an oval aluminum cover over the balance platform. If you remove this cover you will then be able to see a precision Hamilton 11-jewel balance platform which was the heart of this timer.

    What someone tried to do to this timer is unclear by the picture, but it looks rather crude.
     
    Kevin W. likes this.
  3. Les McAlister

    Les McAlister Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Dec 16, 2005
    5
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    Here is a picture of what the timer originally looked like.

    Timer 1.JPG
     
  4. garyg

    garyg Registered User

    Feb 2, 2007
    141
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    Hello Les
    Thanks you so much for your detailed reply. I actually took a chance and bought 3 of these. The other 2 are in very nice mahoghany boxes with plug ins on the back.
    When plugged in you can hear them run. I suppose done for display. But they are pretty neat. Door with glass and hinges. They have running clock movements in them. As I am sure you know. I will read your message a couple of times and try to figure them out. I also am excited to see the Hamilton balance wheel,

    Thanks again Gary G
     
  5. garyg

    garyg Registered User

    Feb 2, 2007
    141
    2
    18
     
  6. garyg

    garyg Registered User

    Feb 2, 2007
    141
    2
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    Hello les.
    See post below. Is he describing the same item I have??

    You have described Ralph, the main parts of an AC electric mains powered clock of ca 1930. These were made by Hamilton after the 1928 purchase of the Illinois Watch Company and its Sangamo clock business.

    As a pocket-watch kind of guy as you describe yourself, you're gonna' cry and wish it was an earlier Illinois Sangamo clock instead of the Hamilton.

    The earlier Illinois Sangamo clocks didn't have a synchronus AC motor because their market was for use where utility electrical power was unreliable. Instead the Illinois Sangamo clock used a small induction motor to maintain a small watch type mainspring through a unique gear train. A platform escapement made from 16 size Illinois watch parts provided the timekeeping element. The balance wheel was/is visible through the dial. The clock will usually run about eight or ten hours without electrical power. They were nicely constructed with polished nickel plated parts and some effort to damascene the rear plate.

    Unlike the early Illinois Sangamo clock, the Hamilton Sangamo, while interesting is not so appealing to collectors. Both the Illinois and the later Hamilton clocks were put up in a wide variety of wood mantel and wall cases and including bakelite.
     

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