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Samuel Estell's "Programme Clock"

Jerome collector

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I am seeking images of Samuel Estell's "Programme Clock" for possible use in an article updating information found in a wonderful Bulletin article from December 1987 by Fred Linker. Drawings from Estell's patents are included below. In particular, I'm exploring a possible relationship between Estell and the US Clock & Brass Co. of Chicago (Austin), IL. For those who know their Chauncey Jerome history, Jerome was involved with the US Clock & Brass Co. shortly before his death in 1868. In his article, Linker includes examples with labels of Hadley Brothers & Estell and Jerome & Co. The latter label and shelf clock are typical of clocks associated with S.B. Jerome, one of Chauncey's sons. Linker also includes an image of a wall clock utilizing Estell's patent from what he believed was a circa 1883 New Haven Clock Co. catalog. Tran Duy Ly, in his New Haven book, attributes it to the 1881 catalog. Linker also includes a photo of a wall clock with a Waterbury dial that has Estell's patent feature.

The feature of the patent is that it allows the clock to strike at set intervals, as frequently as every five minutes. My reasons for suspecting a connection between Estell and the US Clock & Brass Co. are twofold: 1) the product line of the company reportedly included a schoolhouse clock "capable of being set to strike at any time, every five or ten minutes, or half hour as may be required…"; and 2) the movement depicted behind the programmable striking device in the drawing for patent No. 98,678 appears to be a 30-hr, spring-driven, US Clock & Brass Co. movement. Other connections between Estell and the US Clock & Brass Co. are geographic (Estell filed his patent applications from Richmond, IN and Chicago) and temporal (his first patent was issued in January 1870, a couple of years after the US Clock & Brass Co. ceased business). I believe that Estell may have been marketing an early, pre-patent version of his invention through the US Clock & Brass Co.

This post is a bit of a long shot, because these clocks appear to be quite scarce. I recently had the pleasure of seeing one up-close at the River Cities Regional in Kansas City last month. The programming wheel visible through the lower glass was visually stunning.

If any owners of one of these clocks care to share images, I'd greatly appreciate it.

Mike
Patent 98678-1.jpg Patent 143230.jpg

Patent 98678-1.jpg Patent 143230.jpg
 
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I have an Estell's Programme Clock. It is wooden, 21"x14". Very....
primitive. Patented Jan. 11, 1870.

I was going to sell it. Do you have any idea its value?

Thank you and ..... any info you have would be appreciated. You can look through the glass at the bottom to see the pendulum moving and it has directions on how to program it and make it ding at different times.


I IMG_9866.jpg
 

JTD

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We are not allowed to discuss values on this part of the forum. But you could send a pm to the enquirer (Jerome Collector ).

JTD
 

Jerome collector

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I admit to being a bit stumped about this one. A person registers on the message board, submits a post on an Estelle programme clock that they're trying to sell and wanting to find out value. The first reply to the post mentions the message board policy of not discussing value but suggests they contact me. I reply later that day and indicate I've sent an email. No reply to my email, no reply to any of the posts on the mb. Not only that, according to the tracking feature on the profile page of missamyh, they haven't logged on to the mb since approximately one-half hour after submitting the second post with additional photos, which was before JTD replied mentioning the policy on not discussing value. I suppose it's possible someone else contacted the person by pm or email, and they took care of business. And I also suppose they could have checked back without logging on. Any other reason (other than a truly tragic one) why someone would post and then not check back to see responses?

With respect to the clock, I believe either the movement has been replaced or the programmable feature has been removed. According to descriptions of this model, the programming wheel was accessed through the rear of the clock. In the case of this clock, a board is now blocking access. I'm frustrated, because these clocks do not show up often, and I was hoping to find out more about the movement.

Mike
 

rfh11

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If you will send me a pm , I believe I can tell you where the clock was for sale.
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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This response may be a dollar short and day late for the purposes of Mike's original request, but I thought it might still be of interest to some.

Thought I would post an example of an Estell Programme clock that I have recently stumbled upon.

There are 2 references to which I will be referring. The first is Fred Linker's excellent Bulletin article:

http://docs.nawcc.org/Bulletins/1980/articles/1987/251/251_446.pdf

Though about 30 years old, to my reckoning, it seems to have stood the test of time rather well. I will refer to this as his "first article".

Fred Linker wrote another article about the earliest form of Estell clocks produced by the US Clock and Brass Co.:

http://docs.nawcc.org/Bulletins/1990/articles/1990/267/267_356.pdf

I will refer to this as his "second article".

I have also found some advertising pertaining to these clocks from several periodicals intended for educators and school administrators from the 1870's. See below.

The clock is a rather unassuming looking small shelf clock:

estell 1.JPG

To me, a rather typical "Jerome & Co." product of the 1870's. It is pine with rosewood veneer in original finish. No, I will not even consider refinishing as I feel the old finish enhances the beauty of the rosewood. I like the original reverse decorated dial surround and tablet.

As a side bar, I will mention that quite a while back there was a thread that pictured the same case with a Beals label containing the type of Pomeroy 8 day time and strike movement often used in these cases and the S.B. Jerome patent "plastic" front cases (often mistakenly called "gutta percha"; they were in fact made from pressed saw dust mixed with glue and dye) which were patented in 1870. The subject clock of that thread was no doubt a Jerome & Co. product.

There were 2 Estell shelf models offered. One was a 20 inch shelf model which in my experience is the most commonly found and a fragment of which is posted above. In the 1871 ad I found, this was the only one and it was referred to as the "Estell's Programme Clock". In the 1872, 1873, and 1874 ad's that I found, there is mention of 2 shelf clocks. The 20 inch one now referred to as the "No. 1...Estell's Programme Regulator". Also mentioned was now a second less expensive option referred to as "No. 2...Polished Rosewood Favorite" described as "square top; plain" with a height of 13 inches and a 5 inch dial. That description matches this clock. There is another shelf model pictured in Fred Linker's first article with a S.B. Jerome patent plastic front that is 15 inches tall. No mention in any of the ad's of that particular model.

The original dial is white painted zinc/metal with black painted Roman numerals. Pretty clean. I also believe the Maltese Cross hands to be original.

My clock has 2 labels. This one behind the tablet:

estell 2.JPG estell 4.JPG

This is the same label as found in some of the S.B. Jerome patent plastic front clocks as well as other Jerome & Co. shelf clocks of the same period. See this reference for more about the labels found in the S.B. Jerome patent plastic front cases: http://docs.nawcc.org/Bulletins/1990/articles/1998/315/315_482.pdf . Scroll down to pages 485-487.

Also see Fred Linker's first article for the labels in his Estell clocks. The label found in his shelf clock is different from mine but was used in other S.B. Jerome patent plastic front shelf clocks.

Note this pencil inscription on the back of the upper door stile:

estell 3.JPG

I believe that it is actually a factory mark. This has not been previously reported.

Note the typical Jerome & Co. patterned paper on the back of the case:

estell 5.JPG

The movement is the Pomeroy 8 day movement found in Jerome and Co. patent plastic front and other Jerome and Co. clocks of this period. The movement is unmarked. They have previously been discussed in the context of the S.B. Jerome patent plastic front clocks on the MB.

Here's the back of the case:

estell 6.JPG estell 7.JPG estell 8.JPG

This is the wheel use to set the reminders. Note the hour marks die stamped into the wheel. I have not seen this feature previously reported. How this wheel actually deviates from the original patent and how the setting is done is described in Fred Linker's 1st article. The opening originally had a tin covering now missing. Anyone know what it looked like? The seller sent a piece of glass to cover it.

The wheel in the presumably earliest model shown in Fred Linker's 2nd article is different. It relies upon the use of removable pins.

Note the instructions label shown. This is as shown in Fred Linker's first article. Mine has some stains and losses. So what.

I found advertisements in periodicals intended for educators, school superintendents, etc. from 1871 to 1874. Except for the first ad which also mentions "colleges" and "hospitals", it would appear that these clocks were promoted for use in schools.

Here are links to those ads:

1871: The New York Teacher, and the American Educational Monthly

1872: The National Teacher

1872: The Michigan Teacher

1873: The Educational Year-book

1874: Wisconsin Journal of Education

I feel that these advertisements are helpful to provide some chronology for these clocks. In 1871, there is one shelf clock (20 inch mode). By 1872, there is a lower priced shelf clock option (tonight's clock), and by 1874, the "No. 0" or "Excelsior Programme Regulator" which is the wall clock and most expensive model makes its appearance. Of note, also mentioned in the 1874 advertisement is a "patented electrical annunciator". That type of thing would make these clocks rather obsolete?

I postulate that the shelf clocks were dropped shortly after the introduction of the wall model which was produced at least until 1881 (see Tran's New Haven book, page 161). For reasons outlined in Fred Linker's first article, the shelf models were probably a bit of pain compared to the wall clock which could be set from the front. Furthermore, I also postulate that these were rendered obsolete as a central master clocks driving "slaves" or annunciators made much more sense for a school building or other institution.

Also note the firms mentioned in the ads. In 1871, it was "Hadley Brothers and Estell" at 41 Madison Street in Chicago. Of note, the Great Chicago Fire occurred in later 1871. By 1872, it was just "Hadley Brothers" at 136 State Street in Chicago. Finally, by 1874, it was "Hadley Brothers and Kane" at the same address.

There are 2 people who posted previously saying they have nice examples of Estell clocks. For Pete's sake, just post them here for people to see.

RM
 
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Jerome collector

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RM,
Wonderful clock! It appears that yours is either the Hadley Brothers & Estell or Hadley Brothers & Kane. Remnants of the label appear to have preserved parts of "Hadley Brothers &". I don't suppose there are scraps of label lying about that would shed light on whether it was Estell or Kane? Based on the advertisements it would seem both are possible. Thanks for posting.
Mike
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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RM,
Wonderful clock! It appears that yours is either the Hadley Brothers & Estell or Hadley Brothers & Kane. Remnants of the label appear to have preserved parts of "Hadley Brothers &". I don't suppose there are scraps of label lying about that would shed light on whether it was Estell or Kane? Based on the advertisements it would seem both are possible. Thanks for posting.
Mike
Thanks for your kind comments. Happy to share this clock.

No, no other bits of evidence as to what the name was after the "&" on the clock's back label. It would be interesting to know if this label was updated as partners in the firm changed or if they continued to use the "& Estell" one as that was what was on hand for what I postulate was a brief run for the shelf models as compared to the wall model?

RM
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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Just a quick update.

In my internet travels, stumbled across another example that sold @ auction about 9 years ago:

7656058_1_x.jpg

Look up Schmidt's Auctions, July 31, 2010, lot 117.

I didn't link to it as I am concerned about the security of my sign-in to the auction website of which they are part.

RM
 
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rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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In the process of looking something else up, I found this version:

estelle 3.jpg

From a 2003 auction. The only other one I know of was pictured in Fred Linkers "first article" I linked to above.

Hard to tell from such a small pic, but I wonder if it's the same clock??

By the way, it was passed!

RM
 

Jerome collector

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RM,
It may be the same clock, but hard to say from two low resolution photos. Although I may be seeing things, it looks as though the gilt-work on the upper border of the lower insert has loss or wear in similar places.
Mike
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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RM,
It may be the same clock, but hard to say from two low resolution photos. Although I may be seeing things, it looks as though the gilt-work on the upper border of the lower insert has loss or wear in similar places.
Mike
I agree.

I also thought, grossly, the scene in the oval looked the same?

RM
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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Thought I would share a recent find.

Above I have posted and discussed an example of the Estell Programme Shelf clock # 2, the lower priced version. See above for pictures and discussion as well as links to two very informative articles about these clocks.

Basically, the first clocks were shelf models. One major disadvantage of these shelf models was that to program the clock to ring once at the desired time(s), the back had to be accessed which might require that it be moved or turned around and thus disrupting the the operation.

Eventually, a wall regulator model would be introduced. The times that it rang could be set from the front without disturbing the clock as much though IMHO, the pendulum gets in the way and would have to be stopped to "program" the clock, i.e., the times when it struck. With the introduction of the wall model, the production of the shelf models seems to have been phased out. See above for more.

In my experience, the wall models are not particularly common clocks. So I thought it would be of interest if I shared an example of one I recently acquired. Not the best pix because it is hanging in a tight spot:

Estell 2.JPG

The figure 8 case is walnut with ebonized highlights and applied leaf carvings with a glazed spun brass bezel and a lower glazed wooden door. Unfortunately, the paper applied to a zinc pan dial is one of those lousy overpaste Schweigert (or whatever the name is) things. Has some age at this point. I tried to scrape off the logo but gave up. It is what it is. I think if a more common clock, it would have discouraged me from making the purchase. But I felt this to be enough of an uncommon one I would accept it.

Here is a close-up of the applied carvings:

Estell 1.JPG

Here is a picture of the label on the back of the clock:

Estell 6.jpg

Dummy here neglected to take more and better pictures of the label and the back of the clock before screwing it to the wall. There are all sorts of repair dates in graphite into the early 20th century, so this clock provided years of service. This label makes no mention of the Chicago merchants mentioned in the labels of the shelf clocks.

On the viewer's left, is the 8 day spring drive brass movement in the wall regulator, on the right, the movement of shelf clock I posted above. In both, the the strike train is modified to strike once on the times set using the, as referred to in the above label, the "sun wheel":

Estell 5.jpg estelle 9.JPG

It would appear based upon these two examples, the makers of the movement of the wall and shelf models are not the same? Note that based upon the escape bridge, the wall regulator appears to have a New Haven movement. The shelf model has what I believe to be a Pomeroy movement.

I did failed to take pix of the pendulum (am I really slipping or what). It has a short wooden stick which hooks to the wire rod. I believe it to be absolutely original. The couple I have found on line have had a variety of different pendulums.

Here is what they referred to as the "sun wheel" in the clock's instruction label. On the viewer's left is the one in the wall clock, the right the previously posted shelf clock:

Estell 3.JPG estelle 10.JPG

Note in the wall clock, it has a hub plate and is mounted below the movement with a tripping and linkage mechanism. In the shelf clock, there is no hub plate and is mounted directly behind the movement.

See the label in posting # 3. Here's the relevant bit:

Estell label.PNG

Makes sense. Otherwise hard to manipulate those "springs" or wires. I wonder if it came with the clock?

Here is a scan from Tran's New Haven book of the 1881 image of the clock:

Estell.jpg

A better image of this is in the first article by Fred Linker that I link to above.

Note the Maltese cross hands in the catalog image. The shelf clock I posted above and the example of the wall clock in Mr. Linker's article also have Maltese cross hands. However, the few examples of other wall clocks I have found on line have hands like the ones on mine.

Also, the lower glass of one of the other examples I found on-line is reverse decorated with a transfer saying "Programme Clock". The catalog cut above does not show this.

As mentioned, the case of my clock has ebonized high lights I have no doubt are original to the clock based upon crazing of the paint, consistency of surface and so on. The catalog cut does not show this. However, this clock shared the same case with other contemporaneous New Haven. See these scans from Tran's New Haven book:

New Haven Calendar clocks Estell.jpg

Note the same case with what appears to be the same ebonized high lights??

Just for chuckles, compare these cases to this Welch clock. The pic is scanned from Tran's Welch book:

Welch alexis Estell.jpg

Not identical, but similar?

A VERY QUICK superfluous thing. Here's a late humorous Currier and Ives lithograph that just cracks me up:

hug me closer 1.JPG

Almost contemporaneous with the clock.

RM
 
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Jerome collector

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RM,
I'm a bit conflicted by your latest Estell posting. On the one hand, it gives me hope that one day I may find one (for a price I'm willing to pay, naturally). On the other hand, the fact that you found another means that there's one less out there for me to find. In all seriousness, it was great to see another example. You've covered all of the bases in your thorough description, so I have nothing to add.
Mike
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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RM,
I'm a bit conflicted by your latest Estell posting. On the one hand, it gives me hope that one day I may find one (for a price I'm willing to pay, naturally). On the other hand, the fact that you found another means that there's one less out there for me to find. In all seriousness, it was great to see another example. You've covered all of the bases in your thorough description, so I have nothing to add.
Mike
Thanks!

It's not perfect as indicated. But this is the first wall model that has crossed my path. Decided to go for it.

Now watch this. 10 at 1/2 the price will now show up.

RM
 

Jerome collector

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I first learned about the Estell Programme clock at a Regional in Kansas City five years or so ago, when I saw one for sale, and was immediately intrigued. As I noted in a posting on the message board at the time, there were tantalizing connections between the Estell programmable feature and both Chauncey Jerome and his son, Samuel Bryan Jerome. In Fred Linker's article on the US Clock & Brass Co. (NAWCC Bull. No. 267, p. 356-358), he documents a similar programmable clock with a US C & B Co. label. He considers the mechanism, which uses removable pins rather than adjustable spokes, to be an early version of the one that was ultimately patented. Although I'm no further along in substantiating this, I agree with Fred that Estell was likely marketing an early, pre-patent version of his invention through the US Clock & Brass Co. Shortly before his death in 1868, Chauncey Jerome's last involvement with the clock-making business was with the US Clock & Brass Co.

The subject of this post is a clock I was able to acquire earlier this spring. The clock bears the label of Hadley Brothers & Estell of 41 Madison St. in Chicago, who are identified as the "Sole Manufacturers". The Estell patent (#98,678), dated Jan. 11, 1870, is prominently mentioned on the label and the dial. From an advertisement in the 1871 New York Teacher, the Estell patent allows the clock to be "…easily set to strike any desired programme of exercises in which the intervals consist of five minutes or multiples of five…" The clock was marketed for use in schools, colleges, and hospitals. The tablet also features the wire-spoked wheel that is at the root of Estell's patent. The label contains the following instructions for setting the strike interval:
"…You will see a wheel containing 144 springs—one for each five minutes during the twelve hours. The springs are movable—can be left down or lifted up, and their ends placed in the small indentation beside them. When all are down the clock will strike once every five minutes. When all are up it will not strike at all."

In addition to holding the label, the backboard has a "wallpaper" covering; a feature that is typical of shelf clocks with the labels of Jerome & Co. and often having features patented by Samuel Bryan Jerome. The particular wallpaper used in this clock is also found in Jerome & Co. clocks.
210508-1-1.JPG 210508-1-2.JPG

The 8-day movement, though unmarked, is the product of Noah Pomeroy. Both unmarked and stamped ("N. POMEROY/BRISTOL CT") Pomeroy movements are associated with Jerome & Co. clocks. The rear view shows the programmable wheel attached to the movement.
210508-1-3.JPG 210508-1-4.JPG

Were it not for the large, round door frame that protects the dial, the case would bear a striking resemblance to a common Jerome & Co. case style that was used for both 30-hr and 8-day movements. However, when casing 8-day movements, the Estell Programme version is larger at 20 3/8" tall (20 1/4" to the peak behind the door frame) by 12 5/16" wide compared to 16 3/8" by 11 3/8". From the back, the wheel is accessible to allow programming the strike intervals. These clocks originally had a removable zinc plate covering the access hole.
210508-1-5.JPG

There is a second patent associated with this clock. Stamped on the outer rim of the dial is "PAT JULY 5 1870". The patent referred to is #105,077, which was invented by George Hills of Plainville, CT. The "invention" was the use of a separate piece of metal for the dial that was secured to the molded brass rim with solder and/or metal clips. This patent feature has also been seen on Jerome & Co. clocks.
210508-1-6.JPG 210508-1-7.JPG Patent 105077-1.jpg Patent 105077-2.jpg

Recapping the Hadley Brothers chronology established by RM in post #9 above, with additional information I came across, yields the following advertisements for the Estell programme clock:
1870 Hadley Brothers, 41 Madison St. (Illinois Schoolteacher)
1871 Hadley Brothers & Estell, 41 Madison St. (New York Teacher)
1872 Hadley Brothers & Estell, 41 Madison St. (Michigan Teacher)
1872 Hadley Brothers, 136 State St. (Michigan Teacher; National Teacher)
1873 Hadley Brothers, 136 State St. (Educational Yearbook)
1873 Hadley Brothers & Kane, 136 State St. (Pennsylvania School Journal)
1874 Hadley Brothers & Kane, 136 State St. (Wisconsin Journal of Education)

Chicago city directories from 1870, 1871, and 1875 contain the following listings:
1870 Hadley Bros., booksellers and stationers, 41 Madison
1871 Hadley Bros., booksellers and stationers, 41 Madison
1871 Hadley Bros. & Estell, mnfrs. Of Estell's programme clock, 41 Madison
1875 Hadley Bros., booksellers and stationers, 63 and 65 Washington
1875 Hadley Bros. & Kane, schl. furnishers, 65 Washington
1875 Hadley Bros., school furniture, 63 and 65 Washington

Unfortunately, I wasn't able to locate Chicago directories from 1872-74. It appears that the Hadley brothers established two separate businesses, one for selling books and stationery and the other (with Estell first and then Kane) to sell Estell programme clocks. Interestingly, though, in 1870 and 1872 (at State St), it appears that there was only the one partnership (Hadley Bros.) involved in both businesses.

While the majority of clocks with the Estell Programme feature have labels of Hadley Brothers (with or without Estell or Kane), some also have Jerome & Co. labels. RM has posted examples of two, one a shelf clock with an 8-day Pomeroy movement and the other a wall clock with a New Haven movement. The latter is pictured in Tran's book on the New Haven Clock Co. (from the 1881 catalog). As noted above, the label contains the claim that Hadley Brothers & Estell were the sole manufacturers of the clock. Multiple advertisements identify Hadley Brothers as being booksellers and stationers; clearly, not clock makers. A directory listing from 1875 has them as being in the school furnishing trade. Aside from the earliest version of the programme clock made by the US Clock & Brass Co., it seems that these clocks were actually made by a company using the name Jerome & Co (connected to either S.B. Jerome or New Haven). Is it possible that, when Chauncey Jerome returned to New Haven from Austin, IL in 1867, he mentioned this unique clock to his son, who then entered into a manufacturing arrangement with Hadley Brothers? Or is it possible that, after a fire in January 1868 destroyed the US Clock & Brass Co. factory in Austin, Estell and/or the Hadley brothers reached out to Chauncey Jerome prior to his death in April or even to Samuel or New Haven directly?

Mike
 

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Very nice write-up, Mike. A preview of your next Bulletin article or a chapter in that book? ;)

When I saw the lower door glass, I was struck by the similarity in style to the glasses in some Jerome and Co. timepieces I picked up a few years ago. There are other clocks in this thread that carry similar characteristics.

Jerome & Co. Time Piece | NAWCC Forums
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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I first learned about the Estell Programme clock at a Regional in Kansas City five years or so ago, when I saw one for sale, and was immediately intrigued. As I noted in a posting on the message board at the time, there were tantalizing connections between the Estell programmable feature and both Chauncey Jerome and his son, Samuel Bryan Jerome. In Fred Linker's article on the US Clock & Brass Co. (NAWCC Bull. No. 267, p. 356-358), he documents a similar programmable clock with a US C & B Co. label. He considers the mechanism, which uses removable pins rather than adjustable spokes, to be an early version of the one that was ultimately patented. Although I'm no further along in substantiating this, I agree with Fred that Estell was likely marketing an early, pre-patent version of his invention through the US Clock & Brass Co. Shortly before his death in 1868, Chauncey Jerome's last involvement with the clock-making business was with the US Clock & Brass Co.

The subject of this post is a clock I was able to acquire earlier this spring. The clock bears the label of Hadley Brothers & Estell of 41 Madison St. in Chicago, who are identified as the "Sole Manufacturers". The Estell patent (#98,678), dated Jan. 11, 1870, is prominently mentioned on the label and the dial. From an advertisement in the 1871 New York Teacher, the Estell patent allows the clock to be "…easily set to strike any desired programme of exercises in which the intervals consist of five minutes or multiples of five…" The clock was marketed for use in schools, colleges, and hospitals. The tablet also features the wire-spoked wheel that is at the root of Estell's patent. The label contains the following instructions for setting the strike interval:
"…You will see a wheel containing 144 springs—one for each five minutes during the twelve hours. The springs are movable—can be left down or lifted up, and their ends placed in the small indentation beside them. When all are down the clock will strike once every five minutes. When all are up it will not strike at all."

In addition to holding the label, the backboard has a "wallpaper" covering; a feature that is typical of shelf clocks with the labels of Jerome & Co. and often having features patented by Samuel Bryan Jerome. The particular wallpaper used in this clock is also found in Jerome & Co. clocks.
View attachment 687245 View attachment 687246

The 8-day movement, though unmarked, is the product of Noah Pomeroy. Both unmarked and stamped ("N. POMEROY/BRISTOL CT") Pomeroy movements are associated with Jerome & Co. clocks. The rear view shows the programmable wheel attached to the movement.
View attachment 687248 View attachment 687249

Were it not for the large, round door frame that protects the dial, the case would bear a striking resemblance to a common Jerome & Co. case style that was used for both 30-hr and 8-day movements. However, when casing 8-day movements, the Estell Programme version is larger at 20 3/8" tall (20 1/4" to the peak behind the door frame) by 12 5/16" wide compared to 16 3/8" by 11 3/8". From the back, the wheel is accessible to allow programming the strike intervals. These clocks originally had a removable zinc plate covering the access hole.
View attachment 687250

There is a second patent associated with this clock. Stamped on the outer rim of the dial is "PAT JULY 5 1870". The patent referred to is #105,077, which was invented by George Hills of Plainville, CT. The "invention" was the use of a separate piece of metal for the dial that was secured to the molded brass rim with solder and/or metal clips. This patent feature has also been seen on Jerome & Co. clocks.
View attachment 687251 View attachment 687252 View attachment 687253 View attachment 687254

Recapping the Hadley Brothers chronology established by RM in post #9 above, with additional information I came across, yields the following advertisements for the Estell programme clock:
1870 Hadley Brothers, 41 Madison St. (Illinois Schoolteacher)
1871 Hadley Brothers & Estell, 41 Madison St. (New York Teacher)
1872 Hadley Brothers & Estell, 41 Madison St. (Michigan Teacher)
1872 Hadley Brothers, 136 State St. (Michigan Teacher; National Teacher)
1873 Hadley Brothers, 136 State St. (Educational Yearbook)
1873 Hadley Brothers & Kane, 136 State St. (Pennsylvania School Journal)
1874 Hadley Brothers & Kane, 136 State St. (Wisconsin Journal of Education)

Chicago city directories from 1870, 1871, and 1875 contain the following listings:
1870 Hadley Bros., booksellers and stationers, 41 Madison
1871 Hadley Bros., booksellers and stationers, 41 Madison
1871 Hadley Bros. & Estell, mnfrs. Of Estell's programme clock, 41 Madison
1875 Hadley Bros., booksellers and stationers, 63 and 65 Washington
1875 Hadley Bros. & Kane, schl. furnishers, 65 Washington
1875 Hadley Bros., school furniture, 63 and 65 Washington

Unfortunately, I wasn't able to locate Chicago directories from 1872-74. It appears that the Hadley brothers established two separate businesses, one for selling books and stationery and the other (with Estell first and then Kane) to sell Estell programme clocks. Interestingly, though, in 1870 and 1872 (at State St), it appears that there was only the one partnership (Hadley Bros.) involved in both businesses.

While the majority of clocks with the Estell Programme feature have labels of Hadley Brothers (with or without Estell or Kane), some also have Jerome & Co. labels. RM has posted examples of two, one a shelf clock with an 8-day Pomeroy movement and the other a wall clock with a New Haven movement. The latter is pictured in Tran's book on the New Haven Clock Co. (from the 1881 catalog). As noted above, the label contains the claim that Hadley Brothers & Estell were the sole manufacturers of the clock. Multiple advertisements identify Hadley Brothers as being booksellers and stationers; clearly, not clock makers. A directory listing from 1875 has them as being in the school furnishing trade. Aside from the earliest version of the programme clock made by the US Clock & Brass Co., it seems that these clocks were actually made by a company using the name Jerome & Co (connected to either S.B. Jerome or New Haven). Is it possible that, when Chauncey Jerome returned to New Haven from Austin, IL in 1867, he mentioned this unique clock to his son, who then entered into a manufacturing arrangement with Hadley Brothers? Or is it possible that, after a fire in January 1868 destroyed the US Clock & Brass Co. factory in Austin, Estell and/or the Hadley brothers reached out to Chauncey Jerome prior to his death in April or even to Samuel or New Haven directly?

Mike
Excellent clock. Excellent write up.

Good things come to those who wait!

RM
 

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Very nice write-up, Mike. A preview of your next Bulletin article or a chapter in that book? ;)

When I saw the lower door glass, I was struck by the similarity in style to the glasses in some Jerome and Co. timepieces I picked up a few years ago. There are other clocks in this thread that carry similar characteristics.

Jerome & Co. Time Piece | NAWCC Forums
Steven,

Thanks for pointing out the lower glasses in your Jerome & Co. timepieces. There is a similarity, though it may be no more than a common approach to filling a narrow rectangular piece of glass with a pleasing geometric design.

Not sure about an article and even less sure about a book. I think most of the information regarding the Estell Programme clock has already been mined and published. As for the mysterious Jerome & Co. (maybe it's only a mystery in my mind), I have an article title in mind that goes "Will the real Jerome & Co. please stand up". I've been peddling the idea that two Jerome & Cos were in business in New Haven at the same time: New Haven (using "Jerome & Co." as a trade name) and S.B. Jerome (who definitely was in business as S.B. Jerome & Co.). Regarding the latter, there are a few labels out there that indicate the clocks were made by "S.B. Jerome & Co.", but did he shorten that to "Jerome & Co." at times? As many times as I've read Snowden Taylor's attempts to nail down the various Jerome & Cos, I am always left as confused as when I started. The New Haven city directory has listings from 1879-1882 indicating S.B. Jerome was associated with Jerome & Co. Prior to that, he was continuously listed in directories as a clock maker (or manufacturer) under his name alone (no company name listed). The New Haven Clock Co. did incorporate a subsidiary business under the name "Jerome & Co.", but that didn't occur until 1882.

Yesterday, after reading through your J & Co. timepiece thread, I started focusing on the external alarms associated with Jerome & Co. clocks (ones that I connect to S.B. Jerome). The one in your first timepiece is the same as the one in a Jerome & Co. with an 8-day Pomeroy movement that I have. I'm pretty sure I've seen that alarm in other Jerome & Co. clocks with Pomeroy movements. Jerome & Co. clocks with New Haven movements, on the other hand, have what appears to be a style of alarm that was used by New Haven for many decades. Confounding all of this is a post on the message board that has what I consider an S.B. Jerome-style clock (with wallpaper backboard) with a New Haven alarm. I have also seen other (non-Jerome) clocks with Pomeroy movements with an entirely different style of alarm. Given that some of the alarms could have been after-market, it's frustrating trying to see meaning in the patterns. However, accepting the argument for the moment that all of the Jerome & Co. clocks are the product of New Haven, I do have to ask why they would purchase movements from Pomeroy (their own movements were perfectly suitable) and why wouldn't they use their own external alarms? Using another maker's products would seem to lessen the profit New Haven would expect from sales of the clocks. [I think I've successfully hijacked my own thread.]

Mike
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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Yes, but...now I have to find the other case styles (shelf and wall), as well as the version with the US C&B Co. label. My mission is not complete.
Mike
Give it time.

It never ceases to amaze me what turns up when least expected, and that's not just clocks.

After all, ain't that part of the fun and excitement of collecting?

RM
 
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rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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I first learned about the Estell Programme clock at a Regional in Kansas City five years or so ago, when I saw one for sale, and was immediately intrigued. As I noted in a posting on the message board at the time, there were tantalizing connections between the Estell programmable feature and both Chauncey Jerome and his son, Samuel Bryan Jerome. In Fred Linker's article on the US Clock & Brass Co. (NAWCC Bull. No. 267, p. 356-358), he documents a similar programmable clock with a US C & B Co. label. He considers the mechanism, which uses removable pins rather than adjustable spokes, to be an early version of the one that was ultimately patented. Although I'm no further along in substantiating this, I agree with Fred that Estell was likely marketing an early, pre-patent version of his invention through the US Clock & Brass Co. Shortly before his death in 1868, Chauncey Jerome's last involvement with the clock-making business was with the US Clock & Brass Co.

The subject of this post is a clock I was able to acquire earlier this spring. The clock bears the label of Hadley Brothers & Estell of 41 Madison St. in Chicago, who are identified as the "Sole Manufacturers". The Estell patent (#98,678), dated Jan. 11, 1870, is prominently mentioned on the label and the dial. From an advertisement in the 1871 New York Teacher, the Estell patent allows the clock to be "…easily set to strike any desired programme of exercises in which the intervals consist of five minutes or multiples of five…" The clock was marketed for use in schools, colleges, and hospitals. The tablet also features the wire-spoked wheel that is at the root of Estell's patent. The label contains the following instructions for setting the strike interval:
"…You will see a wheel containing 144 springs—one for each five minutes during the twelve hours. The springs are movable—can be left down or lifted up, and their ends placed in the small indentation beside them. When all are down the clock will strike once every five minutes. When all are up it will not strike at all."

In addition to holding the label, the backboard has a "wallpaper" covering; a feature that is typical of shelf clocks with the labels of Jerome & Co. and often having features patented by Samuel Bryan Jerome. The particular wallpaper used in this clock is also found in Jerome & Co. clocks.
View attachment 687245 View attachment 687246

The 8-day movement, though unmarked, is the product of Noah Pomeroy. Both unmarked and stamped ("N. POMEROY/BRISTOL CT") Pomeroy movements are associated with Jerome & Co. clocks. The rear view shows the programmable wheel attached to the movement.
View attachment 687248 View attachment 687249

Were it not for the large, round door frame that protects the dial, the case would bear a striking resemblance to a common Jerome & Co. case style that was used for both 30-hr and 8-day movements. However, when casing 8-day movements, the Estell Programme version is larger at 20 3/8" tall (20 1/4" to the peak behind the door frame) by 12 5/16" wide compared to 16 3/8" by 11 3/8". From the back, the wheel is accessible to allow programming the strike intervals. These clocks originally had a removable zinc plate covering the access hole.
View attachment 687250

There is a second patent associated with this clock. Stamped on the outer rim of the dial is "PAT JULY 5 1870". The patent referred to is #105,077, which was invented by George Hills of Plainville, CT. The "invention" was the use of a separate piece of metal for the dial that was secured to the molded brass rim with solder and/or metal clips. This patent feature has also been seen on Jerome & Co. clocks.
View attachment 687251 View attachment 687252 View attachment 687253 View attachment 687254

Recapping the Hadley Brothers chronology established by RM in post #9 above, with additional information I came across, yields the following advertisements for the Estell programme clock:
1870 Hadley Brothers, 41 Madison St. (Illinois Schoolteacher)
1871 Hadley Brothers & Estell, 41 Madison St. (New York Teacher)
1872 Hadley Brothers & Estell, 41 Madison St. (Michigan Teacher)
1872 Hadley Brothers, 136 State St. (Michigan Teacher; National Teacher)
1873 Hadley Brothers, 136 State St. (Educational Yearbook)
1873 Hadley Brothers & Kane, 136 State St. (Pennsylvania School Journal)
1874 Hadley Brothers & Kane, 136 State St. (Wisconsin Journal of Education)

Chicago city directories from 1870, 1871, and 1875 contain the following listings:
1870 Hadley Bros., booksellers and stationers, 41 Madison
1871 Hadley Bros., booksellers and stationers, 41 Madison
1871 Hadley Bros. & Estell, mnfrs. Of Estell's programme clock, 41 Madison
1875 Hadley Bros., booksellers and stationers, 63 and 65 Washington
1875 Hadley Bros. & Kane, schl. furnishers, 65 Washington
1875 Hadley Bros., school furniture, 63 and 65 Washington

Unfortunately, I wasn't able to locate Chicago directories from 1872-74. It appears that the Hadley brothers established two separate businesses, one for selling books and stationery and the other (with Estell first and then Kane) to sell Estell programme clocks. Interestingly, though, in 1870 and 1872 (at State St), it appears that there was only the one partnership (Hadley Bros.) involved in both businesses.

While the majority of clocks with the Estell Programme feature have labels of Hadley Brothers (with or without Estell or Kane), some also have Jerome & Co. labels. RM has posted examples of two, one a shelf clock with an 8-day Pomeroy movement and the other a wall clock with a New Haven movement. The latter is pictured in Tran's book on the New Haven Clock Co. (from the 1881 catalog). As noted above, the label contains the claim that Hadley Brothers & Estell were the sole manufacturers of the clock. Multiple advertisements identify Hadley Brothers as being booksellers and stationers; clearly, not clock makers. A directory listing from 1875 has them as being in the school furnishing trade. Aside from the earliest version of the programme clock made by the US Clock & Brass Co., it seems that these clocks were actually made by a company using the name Jerome & Co (connected to either S.B. Jerome or New Haven). Is it possible that, when Chauncey Jerome returned to New Haven from Austin, IL in 1867, he mentioned this unique clock to his son, who then entered into a manufacturing arrangement with Hadley Brothers? Or is it possible that, after a fire in January 1868 destroyed the US Clock & Brass Co. factory in Austin, Estell and/or the Hadley brothers reached out to Chauncey Jerome prior to his death in April or even to Samuel or New Haven directly?

Mike
I just happened to be re-reading this posting and something struck me about the tablet in the clock which may have been commented upon previously as well as blatantly obvious to others.

The transfer decorating the tablet depicts the very thing that makes these clocks so unique, i.e., the "programme" wheel. Not sure, then, why it wasn't used on the other 2 shelf models for the same reason?

The wall model has the wheel below the movement where it was more readily accessible from the front of the clock through the lower door and also visible through the tablet. Didn't need to be depicted on the tablet. Furthermore, this also represented a vast improvement, as on the shelf models the wheel was accessed through the back behind a tin cover. This would probably require turning the clock around and thus disturbing its function.

RM
 

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