Sad and Happy with the low prices at the auctions

Discussion in 'General Clock Discussions' started by timepast, Jun 15, 2017.

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  1. timepast

    timepast Registered User

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    Other members have commented before about the drop in prices for vintage and antique clocks. Yes the very high end clocks still fetch a good price but I see alot of average and above average clocks go for so little at my local auctions. Everything from tubular clocks tall case clocks to very nice mantel clocks have fallen off by about 25-30% from just a couple years ago. In some ways this is great for buyer and collectors... but also sad that maybe people will start junking old clocks because of the low selling point. Just wish I had more room to collect...[REMARK][/REMARK]
     
  2. timepast

    timepast Registered User

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    The impetus for this post was a federal reproduction of a 19th century american tall case clock with amazing inlays and a beautifully proportioned cased which went for $130 and a Quezal leaded stained glass lamp shade which sold for $20 with a similar was appraised for thousands on the Antique road show..
     
  3. novicetimekeeper

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    auction prices for all sorts are really low these days. People flock to places like IKEA when beautiful furniture made by craftsmen can be bought for so little at auction.

    I would not be a collector of longcase were it not for the low prices, and even my first purchase has fallen in value since I bought it but I knew less then than I know now and have been a bit sharper since then.

    I still see clocks at dealers priced so high I can't believe they will ever sell, some people are finding it hard to adjust.
     
  4. shimmystep

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    I agree Timepast, the current market is likely to lead to good clocks being dumped. We have a fairly healthy car boot culture over here so I like to think many will be sold there, but increasingly the cost of service or restoration makes less sense to clock buyers/owners as their market value drops.

    As Nick has mentioned, antique dealers still try and get high retail prices, and I also wonder how they'll sell them like that, but at the same time I feel that in some ways that might try and maintain some market value on clocks in general.
     
  5. Jim DuBois

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    #5 Jim DuBois, Jun 16, 2017
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2017
    After collecting clocks since 1970 it is pretty amazing to see prices today being similar to what they were back then, on many clocks. My restoration customers (dealers) have just about all given up on paying for any major restoration work. I am still doing some repair and restoration for some serious collectors but even that has dropped off. I have in the last year been given a number of clocks needing this or that, frequently very little needed, but the owner just says "keep it, not worth the cost of repairing." And often they are correct. We see many clocks being parted out on the big auction site (and others) as they will bring far more as parts than as a whole clock. Really sad and with the IKEA / disposable mentality society of today I don't see any near resurgence of the market for many antiques, clocks incuded. I am seeing good to better antique furniture bringing 10 cents on the dollar of what it brought 20-30 years ago.... really great stuff still will bring decent money on ocassion....

    Prices of clocks really didn't start their rise stateside until the mid to late '50's. And then prices went up pretty fast. I recall one of the founding members of the NAWCC telling me the most he ever paid for a clock was $3.50. He did most of his collecting in the '30's and '40's. He must have had 250 clocks and we were in the midst of them when he made that claim...and many of them by then (1975 +/-) were $500-$1000 clocks, or more.
     
  6. novicetimekeeper

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    The clock breakers break my heart. I know one and he originally justified what he does as they are marriages any way, but I and others have challenged him over original longcase that are absolutely correct that he has broken for parts. He just does it to make more money

    I even offered to save one by offering him a complete price but he turned it down. He actually got less for the component parts than I offered but he just shrugs and carries on.
     
  7. Snapper

    Snapper Registered User

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    I can't help but feel a tad despondent over the continued downturn in clock values. My modest collection, I'm sure, will have suffered as most others particularly as I have purchsed some from dealers already restored. As alluded to above this downturn is reflected in the values of brown furniture, much of which are unique, craftsmen produced articles which will, given tlc be around for another couple of centuries assuming our successors do not succumb to "old is worthless" point of view.

    Whilst fashions come and go in a natural rhythm, I personally do not expect prices to rise any time soon as modern generations have been conditioned into discarding old for new irrespective of merit and in contraflow to the ideology of recycling to "save the planet".

    I am not confident that my beloved clocks will be cherished after my leaving this mortal coil and it hurts a lot when I consider the love, appreciation and hours spent at the bench to bring them to a condition where they perform as well as they did when they left their makers. A visit to any antique or clock fair says all when observations show the average age of visitors and traders to be, shall we say of "senior" years. I accept that maybe I generalise and I will take criticism on the chin but I can only speak from my own point of view.

    On the positive side I rather hope that I have a few more years of clock reairing and restoration in me yet and whatever may happen outside my workshop will not affect my enjoyment of my preferred occupier of time. I expect that my comments will be challenged and others will doubtlessly point to examples of skilled younger lads and lasses keenly performing miracles with modern machinery and clear eyes and hand co-ordination and I sincerely hope that our trade/hobby is in their safe hands. The problem is finding such folk.
     
  8. shutterbug

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    I was in the antique business for many years, and observed that people wanted what they remember seeing in Grandma's house. It's a "cherished memories" thing that drives the sale. However, my generation did not typically have mechanical clocks in their homes (except Grandfather and cuckoo clocks), so the younger people now don't have those memories to inspire nostalgia. Therefore, the old clocks we love are not in their sights for purchasing.
     
  9. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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    #9 rmarkowitz1_cee4a1, Jun 16, 2017
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2017

    I have found that current prices are a very mixed bag with the overwhelming trend towards lower.

    In some instances, I would be thrilled to get 70-75% of what I paid some years ago at the top of the market. For some clocks and antiques, the drop off has been astoundingly precipitous. We're talking in some instances 5-10 cents on the dollar. And not because it was bad stuff in terms of authenticity or condition. No one wants it. Gingerbreads, school house clocks, ogees, calendars and a lot of much better quality clocks...can't give 'em away.

    A lot of furniture has taken an absolute beating. For example, I've attended auctions where real American Chippendale country side chairs-singles, pairs, sets-can't even get an opening bid. Slant front desks. Again, unless special, can't give them away. American Windsor chairs. Again, unless really special (not too long ago I saw a pair that the pezzonovante decided were for whatever reason were "ooooh gracious so special" bring $50K) no money. I can go on and on. That's true of many things that I remember not long ago were > $1000, now struggling to make an opening bid.

    I do think it is a bit too facile to blame an Ikea mentality. There has been a real change in tastes and thus what are now considered objects of desire. Look at the prices for good "mid-century (20th that is) modern" furniture and decorative arts. Some of that stuff is bringing prices that equal or eclipse what traditional "brown furniture" and antiques once brought. I have no trouble admitting to liking a lot of it myself.

    The millennials who would be the next in line are also facing a very different world than I and my contemporaries faced. A good job is now considered being a barista at Bigbucks Coffee and they're living in their old rooms at mom's and dad's house as they try to pay off mortgage size student loans. You're not going to consider buying a tall case clock under those circumstances.

    Some is functionality. Going back to slant fronts. Not conducive to using a desk top computer so they fell out of fashion. With smaller tablets, they might come back. I remember when armoires were sought as entertainment centers. Well, they're in the terlet now that people hang their 64 inch flat screens prominently in a room the way one might have once displayed an important painting.

    Finally, so many of us collectors are aging and downsizing. Few are in buy mode and many want to sell. It's creating a glut of stuff that was bought at high prices and often, I hate to say, wasn't very good.

    The world has changed and that stuff it NOT coming back.

    RM
     
  10. George Nelson

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    RM,

    As usual, your posts are both enjoyable and informative. You make some very good, intelligent points about today's prices, and they make good sense. Shutterbug, your points are very well taken aso. I am always so very amazed at how smart our contributors are.

    As for me, I never invest in items that have a history of unstable values for profit or security. I collect clocks and other antiques for the interest and history alone, which sort of makes me a bit different from other collectors. RM, I suspect that you are a bit like me in that you collect for the history and interest, rather than as an investment. Collecting in this way will often allow the person acquiring a piece a measure of comfort in that there is no worry about future rises in value. He/she acquires simply because they want it, and pay a price that is worth it to them. When collecting is over, I plan to pass my collection on to someone who will appreciate it like I do/did.

    Best to all,

    George
     
  11. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Thank you.

    I have collected for the reasons you state, no doubt.

    But it would be an added benefit if I could at least break even in the end as I do have a fair amount tied up the stuff at this point.

    RM
     
  12. harold bain

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    RM, I'm sure you will break even at the end, as no one leaves this world with more than they came with:whistle:
     
  13. isgus

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    I have collected based on what I like and what I currently have and, of course, price. I don't have two clocks that are alike. If I see something that I don't have and it is a reasonable price (to me) I will buy it. I have more than I should have, but not enough to satisfy me. I have three sons. Only one has 'claimed' a clock when I leave this world. It was my first clock, a grandfather that I put together from a case purchased at auction and a movement I picked up someplace years before that. I have many that are far better then that one but it is the one that was outside his room from when he was a baby and that's only one he wants. My middle son has a granddaughter clock that I bought at an online auction and turned out to be something I didn't really want but he liked it, so he has it. Again, I have many far better but he likes it for some reason. My oldest has no interest in any of them. I have been asked by my family to document them all, including estimated worth. I have documented maker and age as best I can and only included which ones were 'most valuable' (as compared to the rest), not estimated worth. Also included my favorites, just in case its means anything, ha!

    I have tried to impart some knowledge on my sons as to the history and intricacies of clocks but I get the standard response of 'winding them is a pain'. I have imagined my collection will either be sold for next to nothing or end up in the garbage some day if I'm gone. As the time gets closer I will just start letting them go for whatever I can get for them and hopefully to someone that will appreciate them (or at least give me that impression).

    EDIT: My oldest just came over for a visit with his friend and his girlfriend (all around 28 yrs old). He showed them my office where my clocks are and she said she loved them!! Just for fun I asked if she wanted one, would love for her to have one since she seemed to appreciate them. Take your pick, mantle, wall, grandfather.....'thanks but I have no place to put one'. Cant even give them away. Sigh.
     
  14. Chris Radano

    Chris Radano Registered User

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    A couple thoughts and observations:

    If clocks are being parted out, and the parts are selling, is this really so terrible? The parts are then in theory being used where needed. Personally I don't like good clocks being parted out, but perhaps it's not the worst thing that can happen.

    Sure not many people are interested in old clocks, for many and various reasons. But, there are more people now than ever. Now, as in the past, collecting clocks and maintaining them is not for everyone.

    There will always be people interested in antiques, and antique machinery will always have some interest. Interest will never spread to the masses.

    I am frankly uninterested and underwhelmed in most of what I see available. Could it be most of the good stuff is either in people's collections, or not being sold unless prices climb somewhat?
     
  15. Chris Radano

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    #15 Chris Radano, Jun 17, 2017
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2017
    A couple more observations: There have been recent auctions, in the USA as well as other countries, where very good examples of collectable clocks were sold. The prices have been somewhat healthy. Not top prices, but in general not bad. That applies to intermediate to advanced collector level clocks only.

    Since the internet has been available in the last 15-20 years, it has affected clock prices... in ways maybe we are beginning to understand, and seem to be now considered normal. More people are looking for bargains. Online auctions, at their inception, increased demand. But lately auction houses have raised their buyer's premiums to now 18-25%, many times 28%, is now considered average. This, coupled with shipping costs, has offset demand. all this is probably affecting prices.
     
  16. novicetimekeeper

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    #16 novicetimekeeper, Jun 17, 2017
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2017
    It certainly seems to work to pick your auctions, I would never have got my ebonised bracket for that price in a UK auction even allowing for carriage costs.

    I can't agree about the clock breakers though, fine if beyond economical repair or already a marriage but breaking a perfectly good clock because its parts are worth more than the whole is just wanton vandalism in my book and not done by anybody with a passion for clocks.
     
  17. Chris Radano

    Chris Radano Registered User

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    I don't agree with clock breakers, I don't buy parts I know are taken from a good clock. But if these parts are being sold, is this in theory not a bad thing? We've been complaining about clock breakers forever. But someone is buying parts. I realize I have no control over things I don't like. Personally, I don't have any clocks are less than 95% complete...that is my advice to stop clock breakers - only buy complete or nearly complete clocks.
     
  18. novicetimekeeper

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    I have bought parts, but where possible I prefer to fit new if available. When restoring houses I would fit new and I take the same approach to clocks. Not having a lathe means that sometimes I need smaller parts second hand, as some parts are just not made unless to special order.

    Going forward though I'm getting more annoyed about clock breaking and more likely to buy new or commission parts.
     
  19. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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    #19 rmarkowitz1_cee4a1, Jun 17, 2017
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2017
    Some very good observations have been shared here. I hope I don't drag down the level of the conversation for once.

    Specifically with regards to clocks, then.

    RE: the internet and prices.

    I will state straight off that my presence at a number of live auctions these days is on-line. Sometimes I have gone to look at lots. Other times, the auctions are 100's of miles away or the time inconvenient for me to be physically present. I have found auction houses are generally rather accommodating about providing condition reports and/or forwarding additional pictures. Internet bidding is a great tool when used wisely. I accept the higher premium as the price for the convenience though I do figure it in when bidding.

    I do believe that it has caused an overall downward pull on prices. This is multifactorial.

    I believe one major factor is the very changed perception of what is "rare". I remember when certain American clocks were designated as "rare" by even knowledgeable auctioneers and accepted as such. Well, with the emergence of eBay and such where there seem to examples of previously labelled "rare" clocks popping up with a certain frequency now, it's really changed those perceptions and consequently the prices achieved. Furthermore, those readily accessible prices are now accepted as the benchmark.

    There is the flip side. Besides the laughable overuse on eBay of terms like "rare" and "mint". Namely, that a seller has a ridiculous price on an item because "that's what I see them selling for on-line, go look". Sorry son, but that's what they're listing them for, sometimes over and over again, as a 29 day auction.

    My personal experience is that I get clobbered by the internet competition at live auctions. I think on some lots they buoy up the price. I've seen internet bidders pay a real premium for stuff, sometimes things that are really a total mess and you wonder if they really knew what they were bidding on...or if they cared? I also feel that internet bidding slows down a live auction in a number of ways.

    I believe internet bidding at live auctions has emptied the auction room. Some of the local auctions I go to are well attended as it is also a way people can interact and "network", make those parking lot deals, deliver merchandise previously sold, etc. However, many times the room is sparsely populated with a majority of the lots "going to the internet" or "to the book". Almost all auction rooms now have employees manning banks of computer screens. Many even prominent auction houses now have "on-line only" auctions regularly. Come look, but bid on-line.

    RE: cannibalism.

    This has been debated rather frequently on the MB.

    I guess I cannot get too bent out of shape if someone buys junkers for parts and pieces. I have a pile of totally trashed empty ogee and ww cases stacked in my garage that donate glass, mirrors, pieces of nice old veneer, hardware like cut nails, off-center slot screws, and so on. I use them to appropriately restore not just clocks, but other old things.

    I have no tolerance of someone who buys an intact clock or one that is eminently restorable and cannibalizes it. There's one guy around here who attends all the local auctions who does that with the usual rationalizations. He's parted off some rather nice stuff.

    And that is my sermon for today.

    RM
     
  20. Jim DuBois

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    As a recent exercise in foolishness, I did a scan of every antique clock listed on a certain large online site. 7973 items to be precise. I sorted them by highest to lowest starting bid/or current price. More than 80% of the clocks offered in my opinion will not sell at the starting bid price, or buy it now prices, and many are completely foolish starting bid prices. Only about 6% of the clocks had a bid at the time of my review. I just looked at the 800 highest priced clocks at the so-called auction, not a single bid on the top priced 800 clocks? A couple of them are most likely fairly priced. But advertising clocks for $88,000 and cast iron black mantel clocks for $999.99? Really now? I have to assume some of these so called sellers subscribe to the greater fool theory...but it is getting increasingly difficult to come up with greater fools with large bank accounts..what assumptions can we draw from all this? It seems as though the site is being used more and more as an advertising medium rather than an online auction site. There is no realization of today's clock market values by so very many of these listers..can't call them sellers in most cases. Since listing is not free and some of these clocks have been for sale for 12 months or more at these crazy prices, it does give cause to ponder a bit...what the heck is going on? I go to live auctions and see decent clocks being passed with no bid, or being sold for $.10 on the dollar or less, then see the same clock or one very similar on the big auction site for 40x or even more. I remain confused and am getting more so....:confused:
     
  21. novicetimekeeper

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    I quite often see clocks I've seen at auctions then offered on ebay either in parts or complete at inflated prices. I have tackled a few with misleading descriptions but Ebay won't deal with them

    One was a bracket clock sold at auction, condition report said it was a marriage, hammer price £850. Sold on ebay for £6000 described as the most original clock the dealer had ever seen, and part of a private collection fresh to market.
     
  22. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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    #22 rmarkowitz1_cee4a1, Jun 17, 2017
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    I've seen the same many times.

    Now, to play the devil's advocate. It is possible that the object passed through several pairs of hands before reaching the eBay seller who wasn't aware of the problems. How about, I have also seen items that were incorrectly catalogued by the auctioneer and it was better than they thought.

    By the way, what you describe is not new nor more characteristic of one selling venue than another.

    I'm not sure which site to which you refer, but if it's "1stdibs" (can I say that on the MB?) then I'm not surprised. I've also found a similar phenomenon on the auction sites like "bidsquare", "invaluable" and so on.

    First, many of the dealers on 1stdibs, a few of whom I know, charge and surprisingly get more than premium prices because of whom they are and the well heeled clientele that they typically deal with. Often it's people who are decorators and spending someone else's money and rather freely at that. It's about a certain look.

    RM
     
  23. novicetimekeeper

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    No, the ebay seller bought it at the auction. He said the description was a mistake and it was too late to correct it. (I suggested deleting and starting again but he was not prepared to pay the listing fee.)

    I had the condition report and all the additional photographs, it wasn't right.

    I agree, I buy things all the time at auction that have been misdescribed. Just bought a waywiser this morning described as a nautical clock.

    However there are usually enough of us involved in an auction to see past the woeful auctioneers' descriptions, this went for ten times their estimate.
     
  24. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    As I say, just playing the devil's advocate.

    RM
     
  25. novicetimekeeper

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    Oh I think you are right, it certainly happens. Don't we all hope to get a bargain.

    In this case though it was just a dodgy seller.

    Sometimes I see things on ebay and wonder why they bother, a buy it now price that isn't much above what they paid at auction including fees and on top of that they had to collect it.
     
  26. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    What perplexes me even more are that there are some sellers on eBay who have listed and relisted the same item at an absurd "buy it now" price or opening bid for months to even years!

    I guess that gets back to a belief in what Jim refers to as the "greater fool" hypothesis... in this instance, keep listing it and hope some day one will come along?

    RM
     
  27. novicetimekeeper

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    i assume you can relist for free unsold items? I watched a clock for a couple of years before buying one by the same maker at auction, i think the other is still for sale.

    There is, I think, an element of advertising involved as suggested.
     
  28. SteveC1964

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    Another factor is the Economy. Collectibles have always been driven by disposable income. Since about 2000, the Economy has been in a slump. It seems to be roaring back. We can hope this will drive clock prices up.
     
  29. Jim DuBois

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    I am quite successful at driving up clock prices. All I have to do is bid on something of interest and up it goes. Usually WAY up. Lucky that way I guess?
     
  30. DeanT

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    Glass half full or glass half empty?

    The glass half full collector would think low prices are great to allow the accumulation of a collection without breaking the bank.

    The glass half empty is that the value of clocks have declined with a lot of cheaper clocks no longer worth restoring. This probably results in less work for clock restorers and therefore the gradual loss of restoring skills.

    Now more than ever collectors should be sticking to quality clocks which are more worth than the cost of restoration. For those who have the inclination and capability of restoring themselves.... happy days indeed!!!!
     
  31. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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    No doubt and probably the most important factor.

    In the U.S., paralleling the decline of prices for antiques of all types, has been the declining economy especially the at times spectacular declines in real estate values, increasing unemployment and so on. Even if an individual wasn't as severely effected as others (in my experience, NO ONE was immune), there was a great sense of caution and a lack of confidence in the future. People weren't spending; many times they had nothing to spend. Other reasons were also being cited, for example people weren't buying houses, so no need to furnish amongst many other related issues.

    However, die hard collectors always seem to find a way to buy even if times aren't great. I do reiterate that there has been a fundamental shift in tastes and what is seen as desirable.

    I do think we're both "star crossed" in that regard. I can sit at auctions and watch lot after lot sell for, relatively speaking, "no money" and when it finally gets to the things I've been waiting patiently for, the place the goes wild and it is not unusual for 1 of 2 things to happen. Most often, I leave empty handed. Too often, pay too much because "dammit, I've sat here all day waiting for that [explicative deleted] thing and I'm not leaving without it".

    Always pays to buy the best.

    There are many opportunities out there to own things that may have until not too long ago been out of reach. So, if you're really a collector, now's not such a bad time to collect with the understanding that you will own it for a very long time and there may never be that pot at the end of the rainbow.

    RM
     
  32. Jim DuBois

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    RM,

    you and I tend to like a lot of the same sorts of clocks...a bit unusual, off the beaten path, unusual makers, unusual movements and the like. But, I have not yet seen you move to brass dial wood works tall clocks......so, you have yet to be exploited ways of spending too much money....I will send you a presentation soon to be given on something from your part of the world...
     
  33. Chris Radano

    Chris Radano Registered User

    Feb 18, 2004
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    I believe clock prices have recovered to a certain extent. Don't look now.... but as we're so busy exclaiming how low clock prices have become, the prices have climbed right under our noses.
     
  34. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Nov 26, 2009
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    Thanks. Nice presentation.

    Maybe someday?

    RM
     
  35. richiec

    richiec Registered User
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    Feb 24, 2007
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    Chris, I really don't see the rise in clock prices, I know at marts you can't give them away recently. People have stopped coming to marts altogether because they can't sell and even break even. I deal in pocket watches, the only buyers are the gold scrappers these days, trying to bundle a lot of watches and offering about 50 cents on the dollar. There aren't enough serious or not so serious collectors any more and the ones there already have the rare and collectible pieces, very few entry level collectors any more. I can't give away a beautiful 17 jewel, 12 size gf watch for $40, average 16 sizes are selling for the cases only these days. Can't get new members to join the local. We are about to advertise in the local paper to invite the public and take a chance on them but not holding out much hope here.
     
  36. Chris Radano

    Chris Radano Registered User

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    #36 Chris Radano, Jun 19, 2017
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2017
    Hi richiec, I can't speak for watches, because I don't buy them. The clocks I collect, have climbed in their selling prices. Some have even increased. Some types of clocks are not at the level they were 15 years ago, but have climbed from the bottom of the last 1-2 years. The last 6 month short term, I see clocks I'm interested in selling for more than I'm willing to pay.

    You do mention something that I suspect as well. Entry level collectors seem to be less and less lately. I suspect, perhaps coinciding with the internet, that people are more educated about aspects of collecting. They are immediately starting with intermediate or more advanced stuff. I do think there are some new people who are becoming interested in clocks and watches (as we see on the message board), but there is a glut of cheap stuff that less people want. It's a hard sell, there are more inexpensive (even more expensive) clocks and watches for sale than buyers.

    Just my personal observations, I could be wrong.
     
  37. ImPondering

    ImPondering Registered User

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    Any reports on the National Convention regarding attendance and pricing?
     
  38. bruce linde

    bruce linde Technical Admin
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    exactly what i was thinking... looking forward to the answer(s).
     
  39. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    Jun 14, 2008
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    I attended the National, arriving on Monday to help set up the very large Ives display and left last night at about 8 pm after we took down the Ives display, boxed it all, loaded the trucks, and then made for adult liquid refreshments. A very special thanks to the NAWCC Museum, the American Watch and Clock Museum, Phillip Morris, George Goolsby, John Delaney, Phil Gregory, Ben Gravolet, Don Bugh, Rick Merrit, Ralph Pokluda, Jon Lester, Peter Nunes, and a raft of others who provided display clocks. Don and Howdy's wives saved the day with their packing of many clocks in preparation for our departure. We might still be there if not for their help.

    A very special thanks to those people who erected the panels and assisted in every way in set up, teardown, packing, and moral support as well as refreshements and other assistance in many matters too numberous to list. Out of fear of leaving someone out I will close it just thanking everyone who provided so much for so long.

    But to the questions above. Firstly there were a lot of tables with many clocks and watches. I saw a number of very nice items, clocks, tools, supplies, and watches, spread though out the MART. Attendence was decent, but not what I had hoped for. Since I am drawn to 18th and early 19th century mostly American clocks I did not find much to ogle and even less to spend money on. I saw a lot of what I consider to be optimistic prices that are not reflective of the prices brough on similar clocks at auction these days. There were some very nice clocks but either not my cup of tea or were just too much money in today's market.

    I did buy 5 clocks, 2 of which are decent examples of what they are, 1 is a marginal example of it's breed, and the other two? Bought primarily for their weights and the opportunity to take photos of some special details on both. There were two other clocks I would like to have bought but neither was special enough to justify their somewhat optimistic price tags.

    There were several really nice tall clocks, a number of fine Austrian clocks, and so forth, none of which caused me to reach for my wallet, but there were some fine things. I have heard attendance was 1200-1500 but that is not counting the general public, and I have no idea how many of the public did show up.
     
  40. George Nelson

    George Nelson Registered User
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    Many thanks for the informative update on National. I sorely wish I could have been there to see the wonderful Ives exhibit and talk with everybody.

    It seems like you had a good time!

    George
     
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