Running a restored 1850's Movement

hydem

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Jun 4, 2022
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I've restored an 1850's 8 Day Calendar movement. It's now mounted on a rack in my workshop and is running quite well, see pic. It does stop on the fifth or sixth day and with a slight nudge of the pendulum, it starts ticking quite happily. This I need to look at in more detail as to why this happens so any advice gratefully received?

I've installed a new gut line onto each drum and neither has run to its full length more than once, do I continue to run the movement on its temporary rack for a while, or do I move it straight over to the case which I've restored?

IMG_2888.JPG Hood.JPG
 

svenedin

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Jan 28, 2010
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I don't want to appear impolite but what exactly did your "restoration" of this movement involve? I would not move it to the case if it is stopping. It clearly is not working properly. The common reason for a movement stopping on the same day is the descent of the weight being interfered with in some way or the line getting caught on something.
 

hydem

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Jun 4, 2022
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I don't want to appear impolite but what exactly did your "restoration" of this movement involve? I would not move it to the case if it is stopping. It clearly is not working properly. The common reason for a movement stopping on the same day is the descent of the weight being interfered with in some way or the line getting caught on something.
I dismantled the movement and cleaned it before putting it back together. Then installed installed a new gut line on the drums. Then a applied a tiny amount of clock oil to movement. I can't see anything interfering with the gut line but thanks for the reply, I'll take a closer look when it stops again.
 

svenedin

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A restoration is a lot more than just cleaning and some oil. Clocks are subject to wear like any machine. All the holes and pivots need to be checked for wear and bushings installed where there is excessive wear. Wear in the holes causes them to become oval which then means the various pinions and wheels don’t mesh properly robbing the movement of the power it needs to run. We all hope that we’ll find a clock that was forgotten about and all it needs is a clean but the vast majority of clocks are in their neglected state because they stopped working from lack of maintenance and repair. So it should be the rule rather than the exception to expect to have to do repair work.
 
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wow

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Jun 24, 2008
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Look up 'symphetic vibration'. These clocks are normally attached to the wall.
Willie X
Yep. That’s it. It usually happens when the weights get low in the case. The lower distribution of the weight in the case causes the case to sway ever so slightly, but enough to cause SV.
 

svenedin

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Looks like the movement is on a sturdy shelf. I shouldn’t think it’s moving like an unsecured case can.
 

Uhralt

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Might have nothing to do with the stopping but the way the right weight is hung looks odd. Is there another hole for the end of the gut line about an inch to the left of the one that's currently being used? The weight lines should run in parallel and not at an angle.

Uhralt
 
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Keith Doster

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Might have nothing to do with the stopping but the way the right weight is hung looks odd. Is there another hole for the end of the gut line about an inch to the left of the one that's currently being used? The weight lines should run in parallel and not at an angle.

Uhralt
I don't doubt that the weight lines should run parallel to each other. But why? I don't understand why it would make any difference unless maybe the lines were significantly separated from one another. Is it because the more they are separated, the shorter the travel, thus causing the clock to stop sooner?
 

svenedin

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The line coming off the drum should be straight down and not coming off at an angle. To do that the lines need to be parallel don’t they? Why? Because at the moment some of the force is trying to pull the movement sideways.
 
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Willie X

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Feb 9, 2008
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Many are offset up to about one inch. This decreases the arc made by the pulley (as it desends) and also adds a bit of stability. Cable angles up to about 10° from vertical make almost no difference in the applied force of the weight. So, I would say that a little spread at the top is desirable, as long as you keep it below 10° max. The max angle would always occur at the wound up position. Willie X
 

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