• Important Executive Director Announcement from the NAWCC

    The NAWCC Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Mr. Rory McEvoy has been named Executive Director of the NAWCC. Rory is an internationally renowned horological scholar and comes to the NAWCC with strong credentials that solidly align with our education, fundraising, and membership growth objectives. He has a postgraduate degree in the conservation and restoration of antique clocks from West Dean College, and throughout his career, he has had the opportunity to handle some of the world’s most important horological artifacts, including longitude timekeepers by Harrison, Kendall, and Mudge.

    Rory formerly worked as Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, where his role included day-to-day management of research and digitization projects, writing, public speaking, conservation, convening conferences, exhibition work, and development of acquisition/disposal and collection care policies. In addition, he has worked as a horological specialist at Bonhams in London, where he cataloged and handled many rare timepieces and built important relationships with collectors, buyers, and sellers. Most recently, Rory has used his talents to share his love of horology at the university level by teaching horological theory, history, and the practical repair and making of clocks and watches at Birmingham City University.

    Rory is a British citizen and currently resides in the UK. Pre-COVID-19, Rory and his wife, Kaai, visited HQ in Columbia, Pennsylvania, where they met with staff, spent time in the Museum and Library & Research Center, and toured the area. Rory and Kaai will be relocating to the area as soon as the immigration challenges and travel restrictions due to COVID-19 permit.

    Some of you may already be familiar with Rory as he is also a well-known author and lecturer. His recent publications include the book Harrison Decoded: Towards a Perfect Pendulum Clock, which he edited with Jonathan Betts, and the article “George Graham and the Orrery” in the journal Nuncius.

    Until Rory’s relocation to the United States is complete, he will be working closely with an on-boarding team assembled by the NAWCC Board of Directors to introduce him to the opportunities and challenges before us and to ensure a smooth transition. Rory will be participating in strategic and financial planning immediately, which will allow him to hit the ground running when he arrives in Columbia

    You can read more about Rory McEvoy and this exciting announcement in the upcoming March/April issue of the Watch & Clock Bulletin.

    Please join the entire Board and staff in welcoming Rory to the NAWCC community.

Run to the warning too long?

Elliott Wolin

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Nov 18, 2019
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I had to repair some broken trundles on the strike side of my Kienzle T&S pendulum movement. After getting the top plate back on, and after I finished my happy dance, I noticed the run to the warning was sort of long. Usually I aim for a half revolution of the warning wheel from locked to warning, but this time I wasn't paying much attention (i.e. I forgot about it) and the run is more like 3/4 of a revolution. It seems to work fine.

Is there a problem here? Should I open the movement up and rotate the warning wheel 1/4 turn? (and then find some pivots slipped out and end up going through the whole process again...sigh...at least I'll get another chance at a happy dance when I eventually get the plate back on)
 

disciple_dan

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Hello, Elliott. Others may have more info but I believe as long as it doesn't lift a hammer early or interfere with the chime in any way it may be ok. If you're like me though you're probably fixing it right now while waiting on an answer. Good luck with it, Danny
 

Elliott Wolin

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Danny: Unlike you and most others, I'm so inept at lining all the pivots up and getting the top plate back on that I only open it up if I absolutely have to. :)

So if everyone agrees with you that all is well I'll just leave it.
 

disciple_dan

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What assembly method are you using? I find that by elevating the movement so that you're looking up from underneath and using a small backlight, one that doesn't shine in your eyes, each hole lights up and is easily seen. I even use a small pen flashlight for the ones that are harder to see. A hands-free light is much easier though.
 

Elliott Wolin

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The movement is on support legs, and I've been looking from above, as that's the height of my workbench. I'll try to figure out how to elevate the movement so I can look from below, as you suggest.
 

disciple_dan

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Right now I'm just using a bucket with the movement on posts. It needs to be something with a large base so it doesn't fall easily. I'm going to invent something when I get my shop all set up at a new location.
I hope it will help you with your assembly. It has helped me many times. You still have to gingerly feel out which one is next in line without putting too much pressure. Be safe, be blessed. Danny
 

Jaap

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A piece of extandable sewertube works for me. And an in heigth adjustable chair.

20201110_202846.jpg 20201110_202837.jpg
 

disciple_dan

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Jaap, I was just trying to be funny I'm just not too good at it. That's a great idea. I've never seen one like that in America. I'll look for one and see if it will work for me.
Thanks, Danny
 

Jaap

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No harm done Dan. It was to good to let pass. In holland we say "het was een open deur in trappen. It was an kicking in an open door. I loved your reaction.
 

R. Croswell

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I agree with Dan, as long as the strike hammer isn't starting to rise during the warning run, and everything is working, and it keeps working for at least a full week, the long warning run shouldn't be a problem. However, even if the hammer isn't partly raised during the warning run, if the star wheel is up against the hammer lift it may still be a problem as the spring runs down and delivers less power near the end of the week. The strike train needs to get some speed before the star wheel starts to lift the hammer or it may stall.

One assembly trick is to use a small flashlight of position a light close above the plate that's on top. Light shinning through pivot holes makes them a lot easier to see on the underside. Nothing says that you have to keep the movement flat during assembly. I frequently pick it up and tilt it this way or that to better see what goes where. Rubber bands around the plates can be helpful. I've seen a few cases where the last two arbors to get placed just would not get into place - one goes in and the other falls out. The solution was to place the movement on its edge and partly insert on pivot in each plate to keep that one in place while I placed the other one. Whatever works. Sometimes simply putting the opposite plate on top can make a difference. I really hate to assemble a movement that has a lot of sloppy pivot holes, its is much easier when the arbors tilt less.

RC
 
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shutterbug

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The length of the warning can be altered fairly easily by moving the gathering pallet position. But if its working, I don't anticipate an issue.
 

Elliott Wolin

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The length of the warning can be altered fairly easily by moving the gathering pallet position. But if its working, I don't anticipate an issue.
Good suggestion, but mine has a count wheel.

Also, I'm just now getting it back in beat (I must have inadvertently rotated the anchor w/r/to the crutch as it was perfectly in beat before I worked on the strike train). When it's working I'll watch it for a week, check that the strike hammer isn't rising at the end of the run, and have a look at the star wheel.
 

SuffolkM

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On the plate reassembly, I find that if some arbors are a bit longer than others, that's the most time consuming problem (not so much side shake). Pivots of different lengths make getting the plates down a lot slower because you have so much to check before you apply any force. It's so easy to bend pivots. I prefer to keep the piece stable in stands rather than turn it in my hands. At least that way, things don't move to new positions all the time. On the wheel position, if there is not enough running when the strike goes into warning, you might find at the end of the spring's power band there isn't quite enough momentum to get the strike train going.
 

shutterbug

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If you feel the warning run is too long (It should be about 1/2 turn), check to see if the warning stop lever is raising enough to hit the pin when it is released. If not, you can bend it upward a little. It might be catching it the second time around, causing a very long warning run.
 
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