Help Rolling Eye Clock by OSWALD

BCR

Registered User
May 3, 2020
65
11
8
Country
I just took in an OSWALD Rolling Eye clock (in the form of a Scottie dog) for repair. This is my first time seeing one in person. It was missing the winding key which is threaded to turn counter-clockwise. Fortunately, I located a suitable key in my parts bin. The movement is very dirty, but with just the slightest winding in order to coil the mainspring to get it away from the clock case (it was uncoiled and jammed firmly against the case), the old movement started trying to run, so I'm hopeful. Anyway, I've looked things over and not sure how to proceed. I am a bit baffled as in how to extract the movement from the case.
IMG_3256.JPG
IMG_3255.JPG
I THINK removing the 3 nuts from the long threaded posts might be where to start but would really appreciate some advice from someone with experience with these. Thank you very much.
 

Simon Holt

NAWCC Member
Mar 21, 2017
1,048
226
63
Shaftesbury, UK
Country
Region
This is probably a stupid question: How do you tell the time with this clock?
The eyes point to the dots, which are effectively the markings on a clock face. Left-hand eye (as you look at it, i.e. the dog's right eye) is the hour (1 o'clock in your picture); the other eye in your picture is pointing to midway between 55 minutes and the top of the hour.

Simon
 
  • Like
Reactions: PatH and Dave Diel

BCR

Registered User
May 3, 2020
65
11
8
Country
At least the clock wont blow up if you do remove them. :) That's a good start.
Yes. I'd say that's the way to do it.
Of course. Thank you. I just prefer to be very cautious when I am unsure. I assume the 3 long threaded posts are somehow attached to the actual clock case. I also assume these 3 nuts, once removed, should allow the movement to be easily removed. But so far this is not the case. I removed the 3 nuts but the movement won't budge. The remaining 3 nuts have to be the ones that secure the back plate to the movement. It wouldn't even be possible to turn the lower right hand nut because it is jammed flat against the inside of the case, so that had to be tightened when the movement was outside the case. Am I missing something? If anyone has had the experience of successfully removing one of these movements from this same type of case, any pointers would help.
 

BCR

Registered User
May 3, 2020
65
11
8
Country
OK, I replaced the 3 nuts on the long threaded shafts. Then I loosened 2 of the nuts that I could turn on the short threaded shafts and now the movement is coming loose. So YES INDEED the movement could "blow up" as ROUGHBARKED so humorously stated. Glad I was more cautious.
 

BCR

Registered User
May 3, 2020
65
11
8
Country
SUCCESS!! I was able to turn the lower right screw with my smallest needle nose pliers. Then the movement easily came out. It actually started running a little, but it's easy to see that it is in need of a full disassembly, cleaning, etc,. Thanks again for your help. Now I know.
IMG_3260.JPG
IMG_3258.JPG
 
  • Like
Reactions: Simon Holt

Mike Mall

NAWCC Member
Oct 27, 2021
438
147
43
Country
OK, I replaced the 3 nuts on the long threaded shafts. Then I loosened 2 of the nuts that I could turn on the short threaded shafts and now the movement is coming loose. So YES INDEED the movement could "blow up" as ROUGHBARKED so humorously stated. Glad I was more cautious.
The neatly sized studs hold the movement to the case, and the oversized studs hold the movement together.
It's as if the maker was setting up a future serviceman for failure.
Another GTB
 
  • Like
Reactions: roughbarked

Forum statistics

Threads
177,648
Messages
1,557,027
Members
53,638
Latest member
Az425
Encyclopedia Pages
909
Total wiki contributions
3,058
Last edit
Watch Inspectors by Kent