Rockford F/S indicator woes

Discussion in 'Watch Repair' started by Lee Passarella, Nov 10, 2019.

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  1. Lee Passarella

    Lee Passarella Registered User
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    Jul 8, 2015
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    I don't even know what I'm dealing with, so I've included a picture. I just got an 1800s Rockford that has been running 10 minutes fast. A watch guy tried to get it to keep time yesterday, but he really didn't do much and maybe it's running 8 or 9 minutes fast now. He seemed to tinker with the little screw (I think that's what it is) in the graphic below. So I tried to do the same. I broke the head of the darn thing off. How serious a problem is that? Does it need to be replaced in order to change the speed at which the watch is running? And can it be replaced? Thanks for you answers.

    Rockford FS.png
     
  2. Skutt50

    Skutt50 Registered User

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    That little "darn thing" is used to regulate the movement. When you screw it in it will push on the regulating arm, making the watch run slower. The U shaped piece is simply a spring pushing the regulating arm on to the screw.

    The screw can be replaced. Just need to find one. (I don't know where though!)

    The watch can be regulated if the U-spring and the screw are removed but the regulating arm is quite loose so the regulation would not last long. Not something I would recommend. (On watches without the screw and spring the regulating arm is made with much more friction so it stays in position.)

    I think 10 minutes may be a bit too much to adjust with the regulator. Perhaps there is another problem e.g. magnetism or oil on the hairspring.
     
  3. Chris Radek

    Chris Radek Registered User
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    If you reported the watch running 10 minutes fast per day, the "watch guy" didn't know what he was doing at all if he tried messing with the (now busted) regulator. No regulator adjustment can fix 10 minutes a day. You're going to have to send it to a real watchmaker who knows enough to find and fix the problem. From your photo, it appears the movement is filthy and perhaps a routine service (cleaning and oiling) would have fixed the timekeeping.
     
  4. Lee Passarella

    Lee Passarella Registered User
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    Actually, Chris, that is not the movement of my watch but an image I commandeered off the internet, provenance not to be revealed. Anyway, my movement is quite clean, but I think you're right about the action needed on the watch. It will have to go somewhere for remediation. Thanks.

    I'm assuming a watchmaker will be able to replace the little doo-dad I broke, but please disenchant me if that's not so.
     
  5. gmorse

    gmorse Registered User
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    Hi Lee,

    I think you've highlighted one of the principle rules of watchmaking, (and incidentally, of all other mechanical concerns), namely that if you don't understand what something does and how it does it, then not only is it not necessary to mess with it, but it's necessary not to mess with it!

    Regards,

    Graham
     
    roughbarked likes this.
  6. darrahg

    darrahg Moderator
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    #6 darrahg, Nov 11, 2019
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2019
    Rockford regulator springs and associated screws are getting difficult to find just lying around. You might have more luck if you purchase another movement with the same type of spring for the part. As an aside, it is important to understand that most of these screws are broken due to excessive force usually caused by corrosion and lack of lubrication. I agree very much with the replies stated above and won't repeat them. Good luck.
     
  7. Lee Passarella

    Lee Passarella Registered User
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    Thanks to all. Luck is what I'll lead now. Knowledge is what I needed before I got into this pickle. As Alexander Pope said, "A little learning is dangerous thing." By extension, absolute cluelessness is deadly.
     
  8. Tom Huber

    Tom Huber Registered User
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    When I see a watch running 10 minutes fast, ffirst thing I do is demagnetize it. Then check for other things.

    Tom
     

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