Riveting

Paul Statham

Registered User
Oct 22, 2020
30
6
8
67
Country
Region
Hi i need to replace this rivet on the click i have never done anything like this before, so can anyone advise me how to go about it what tools what type of rivets steel or brass.Thanks in advance Paul

IMG_20210120_095041041.jpg
 

wow

NAWCC Member
Jun 24, 2008
4,825
455
83
75
Pineville, La. (central La.)
Country
Region
Paul, you, of course, must remove the wheel from the movement, grind or file the back side of the old rivet down where it can be punched out. Then insert a new one, lay it on an anvil and pein it with a hammer until it is snug. Do not tighten enough that the click will not move. A shouldered rivet like the first one on this Timesavers page works well on this type click.

F7730A02-99DF-471E-8D08-D9035DB24897.png
Here’s a better photo:
 

Paul Statham

Registered User
Oct 22, 2020
30
6
8
67
Country
Region
Paul, you, of course, must remove the wheel from the movement, grind or file the back side of the old rivet down where it can be punched out. Then insert a new one, lay it on an anvil and pein it with a hammer until it is snug. Do not tighten enough that the click will not move. A shouldered rivet like the first one on this Timesavers page works well on this type click.

View attachment 633705
Here’s a better photo:
Hi wow I live in the UK don't know if they have shoulder rivets here will have a search thanks
 

glenhead

NAWCC Member
Nov 15, 2009
1,181
208
63
63
Williamson County, Texas
Country
Region
One easy way to keep from locking the click tight when you peen the rivet is to just put a piece of paper between the click and the wheel while you peen it. Post-It notes work well - decent thickness, tough paper, etc.

Glen
 

Paul Statham

Registered User
Oct 22, 2020
30
6
8
67
Country
Region
thanks Glen do you use round or flat rivets or will the round type get in the way also steel or brass?

Paul
 

shutterbug

Moderator
Staff member
NAWCC Member
Oct 19, 2005
45,627
1,658
113
North Carolina
Country
Region
When possible, steel shouldered rivets are your best bet. A quick look at Cousins in the UK shows rivets, but not shouldered ones.
 

Kevin W.

NAWCC Member
Apr 11, 2002
22,983
500
113
63
Nepean, Ontario, Canada
Country
Region
I make my own on my lathe, as the ones i bought usually are not shouldered or right sizes.
 

howtorepairpendulumclocks

Registered User
Dec 18, 2020
269
77
28
53
Country
if you don't have a lathe, I'm sure someone on this forum will turn one for you if you send dimensions. Yes a shouldered rivet is where you need to be at, about 0.25mm higher than the thickness of the click so when you rivet, it doesnt bind.
 

Paul Statham

Registered User
Oct 22, 2020
30
6
8
67
Country
Region
Thanks for your feedback will have a look at counsins again waiting on a spring winder from there must have missed them rivets does it matter about the shape of the head shutterbug
 

Dietofnothing

Registered User
Nov 7, 2020
77
7
8
48
Gilbertsville PA
Country
I just did this one the other night (before image). It was the first time I did it too. I used a drill with a grinding stone to grind off the rivet from the top (click side). I bought a Sessions click kit from Timesavers. You get brass clicks, rivets, and springs new. The rivets were not shouldered - but that’s what I had; so it was going to work. Was not worried about grinding the click cuz was using new one. You could use a file or even drill it out if it’s brass.

Once it was ground thorough, you can pull the click off pretty easily. Then I gently tapped and pulled the old rivet out with a jeweler’s brass hammer & tiny lineman’s style jewelers pliers.

The new click’s rivet was a hair too big for the hole - so I filed the hole with a tiny round file a bit. Then you put the new click in with rivet / spring. I mushroomed the new rivet off with jewelers hammer (steel) hitting a round punch (steel) with a flat face on the rivet.

I didn’t want to use a big hammer cuz everyone says it’s so easy to make them too tight. Took about 10 hits until it was tight not too tight. Then fastened the spring and tested & it worked well.



9C0A95BC-3769-4679-A4A4-21188FF69A56.jpeg
 

MuensterMann

Registered User
Mar 23, 2008
1,429
18
38
and have undoubtedly let some rivets go that should have been replaced. I figured I would probably end up mangling the new rivet and screwing up the whole operation
However, better than mangling your fingers when the click fails when winding!!
 

Paul Statham

Registered User
Oct 22, 2020
30
6
8
67
Country
Region
I just did this one the other night (before image). It was the first time I did it too. I used a drill with a grinding stone to grind off the rivet from the top (click side). I bought a Sessions click kit from Timesavers. You get brass clicks, rivets, and springs new. The rivets were not shouldered - but that’s what I had; so it was going to work. Was not worried about grinding the click cuz was using new one. You could use a file or even drill it out if it’s brass.

Once it was ground thorough, you can pull the click off pretty easily. Then I gently tapped and pulled the old rivet out with a jeweler’s brass hammer & tiny lineman’s style jewelers pliers.

The new click’s rivet was a hair too big for the hole - so I filed the hole with a tiny round file a bit. Then you put the new click in with rivet / spring. I mushroomed the new rivet off with jewelers hammer (steel) hitting a round punch (steel) with a flat face on the rivet.

I didn’t want to use a big hammer cuz everyone says it’s so easy to make them too tight. Took about 10 hits until it was tight not too tight. Then fastened the spring and tested & it worked well.



View attachment 633850
Thanks dietofnothing having a look around to see where i can buy them from cousins in the uk where i live have a set of 50 but can't get them until March 3rd
 

Forum statistics

Threads
163,772
Messages
1,423,318
Members
85,106
Latest member
Marcgo
Encyclopedia Pages
1,101
Total wiki contributions
2,861
Last edit
Bread Upon the Waters by Tom McIntyre