Reversing front-back on Atmos base

Friendofclocks

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Dec 1, 2018
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Well my title says it: can an Atmos clock front/back be switched?

I imagine folks here will figure out why one would ask this. But I’ll spell out what is the most obvious question in the history of clock production: Atmos clocks have a notch on the base front for the pendulum locking lever, and for “whatever” reason the same on the back, despite no lever. It’s “coincidentally” also true that about half of the Atmos clocks ever produce are marred by having “Joe Smith, thanks for 75 years of unwavering thoroughly docile and completely mercenary corporate servitude” (or something like that) engraved on the front.

Is having the notch on the back as well some provision for the clock being restored to presentableness or marketability or otherwise salvagability on Joe Smith’s demise, or epiphany he didn’t want to be reminded of his servitude with each pendulum oscillation, or his wife’s realization of this on Joe’s becoming senile?
Ok, in a word: can the base be flipped around so the unsightly engraving, plaque, or adhesive residue can be hidden?
 
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KurtinSA

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Just looked at my late 1970s Atmos, and Ed certainly is right. The holes through the base to hold down the movement are not evenly spaced front to rear, so flipping it won't work.

Kurt
 

new_hampster

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I believe the holes for the leveling legs also go through the base. Most presentations were done with a plaque, which can be removed, but often leaves marking on the base. If so, or if the clock was actually engraved, it can be covered with a blank plaque or one with a new inscription.
 

shutterbug

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Not to mention that you couldn't find the pendulum lock ;)
 

Friendofclocks

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Just looked at my late 1970s Atmos, and Ed certainly is right. The holes through the base to hold down the movement are not evenly spaced front to rear, so flipping it won't work.

Kurt
Ed and Kurt, thanks for your replies a few weeks back! I wonder if you’re really sure about this? The reason I’m second-guessing is on eBay one can find Atmos bases for sale, and to my surprise the seller is just offering the panel all the components attach to (and legs on the bottom) but not the brass sides (see pic); as it is symmetrical back to front, doesn’t this imply the “plate” within the base both comes out and could be turned around? Thanks again for reconsidering the question!

3243A5D7-C506-4EAA-A3CC-2FC0DEE93B10.png
 

etmb61

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It seems to me like you've never seen the bottom of an Atmos clock so here's a look.
case1.jpg
This is a calibre 528-8. Disregard the arrows. They were for another discussion.

Sure you could drill some new mounting holes for the movement and make a cutout for the level, but you can't just install it backward as it is.

Now from a manufacturing perspective, having the cutouts on the front and back identical allows the person (or machine) punching the center to do so without the need to reorient the part front to back.

Eric
 
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Friendofclocks

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It seems to me like you've never seen the bottom of an Atmos clock so here's a look.
View attachment 645805
This is a calibre 528-8. Disregard the arrows. They were for another discussion.

Sure you could drill some new mounting holes for the movement and make a cutout for the level, but you can't just install it backward as it is.

Now from a manufacturing perspective, having the cutouts on the front and back identical allows the person (or machine) punching the center to do so without the need to reorient the part front to back.

Eric
Thanks Eric, I guess I see what you mean! I was noticing that the center section of the base seen from the bottom has a rectangular (with the corners cut) shape either cut or indented, corresponding to the shape of the plate pictured above. So I was thinking that whole section could be removed. Now I’m thinking it’s really one solid piece and the for-sale plate just goes atop the corresponding outline that matches it (resulting in 2 layers).
Sorry not saying it efficiently; but the leveling bubble part seems so confirm it’s nit symmetrical anyway, after all.

you could see why I might be hopeful it could be reversed: why else would the notches for the pendulum lock be on both front back? Is that lever sometime rested in the back?
 

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